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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, April 18, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, April 18, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Charges Filed in Texas District Attorney Murder In Texas, prosecutors have filed capital murder charges against the wife of a former justice of the peace in Kaufman County. Kim Williams is charged with the murder of the county District Attorney, his wife, and another prosecutor.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Culture Shock 1913 Many have called 1913 the true beginning of 20th century culture. From New York City, where the first large-scale show of modern art alarmed viewers, to Vienna and Paris, where music by Schoenberg and Stravinsky sparked audience riots, this special program dives into a year of artistic upset and audience apoplexy. WNYC's Sara Fishko and guests tell the story, 100 years later, of this mad modernist moment. How does it mirror our own uncertain age?
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Remembering a Slain Photojournalist Photojournalist Tim Hetherington died covering the revolution in Libya. He spent his career reporting from conflicts around the world. Now he is the subject of a documentary made by his friend, journalist Sebastian Junger.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Senate Blocks Gun Control Measures In a setback to gun control advocates, the U.S. Senate rejected several measures on Wednesday, including a bipartisan compromise to expand background checks for firearm purchases. At a news conference, surrounded by relatives of those killed in the Newtown, Connecticut massacre, an angry President Obama said lawmakers had caved to special interests, calling it "a pretty shameful day for Washington." We'll discuss the vote, and look at the prospects for future federal gun control legislation.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum The Forensics of Finding a Bomber Two days after twin bombs ripped through crowds at the Boston Marathon, media outlets were reporting that police had identified a possible suspect thanks to nearby cameras and facial recognition software. What goes into tracking down a bomber? With the remnants of a pressure cooker and hundreds of videos to go by, what will investigators be looking for?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Bill McDonough: 'Upcycling' and Sustainable Design A decade ago, William McDonough co-wrote "Cradle to Cradle," a manifesto advocating the design of products with many lifecycles, such as bottles made solely from biodegradable materials. His new book "The Upcycle" expands on these ideas by applying design solutions to global environmental challenges like food scarcity, clean water and climate change. McDonough urges us to think beyond simply minimizing our impact and to envision a world in which everything we do actually improves the environment.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Code Switch: Ethnicity and Identity Race, ethnicity and culture influence both the news and our lives every day. From the way we speak to different groups of people to the boxes we check on census forms, who we are and how we present ourselves goes far beyond issues of black and white. The show explores how your ethnicity affects your identity -- and how to go about changing them.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air A Photographer's Life and Death on the Battlefield Photojournalist Tim Hetherington was killed while covering the uprising in Libya in 2011. Terry Gross talks with his friend and colleague Sebastian Junger, who pays tribute to Hetherington in the new HBO documentary "Which Way Is the Front Line From Here." The two previously collaborated on the documentary "Restrepo," about an American military outpost in Afghanistan.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Obama Travels to Boston The program reports on President Obama's trip to Boston, where a legacy of freedom meets increasing demands for security. How will America continue to respond to terror in a post-9/11 world, and how much are we willing to change?
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Supercomputers Still on Top Demand for supercomputers is at an all-time high. The show looks into why companies have a big appetite for the blazing speed of bigger, better machines.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Supercomputers Still on Top Demand for supercomputers is at an all-time high. The show looks into why companies have a big appetite for the blazing speed of bigger, better machines.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air A Photographer's Life and Death on the Battlefield Photojournalist Tim Hetherington was killed while covering the uprising in Libya in 2011. Terry Gross talks with his friend and colleague Sebastian Junger, who pays tribute to Hetherington in the new HBO documentary "Which Way Is the Front Line From Here." The two previously collaborated on the documentary "Restrepo," about an American military outpost in Afghanistan.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Religious Minorities in the Middle East The Arab awakening has led to a rise in Islamist governments in the Middle East, raising concerns about the rights of religious minorities. The Middle East is largely Muslim -- but it's also the birthplace of Christianity, Judaism and many other religions. Many non-Muslims have left in recent decades, leaving relatively small populations of non-Muslims and Muslim minority sects. Now, the rise of Islamist political parties raises questions about the rights and protections such minorities can expect. How is Tunisia's Jewish population faring under a new Islamist government there? How are Christians in Egypt reacting to President Morsi? The show also provides a primer on Alawites, the minority Muslim sect to which Syria's president Bashar al-Assad belongs.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Weiner's Second Act Americans love a political comeback. And voters seem increasingly willing to overlook infidelity scandals -- at least that's what former Congressman Anthony Weiner and former South Carolina Governor Mark Sanford are hoping as they set their sights on returning to public office. But former Governors Eliot Spitzer and Jim McGreevey are staying out of politics, at least so far.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Texas Town Reels After Explosion Melissa Block talks with Mike Sulak, manager of West Drug in West, Texas. His house was seriously damaged by the West fertilizer plant explosion. Sulak says his front door and all the windows were blown out of his house, and all the ceilings collapsed. He was out to dinner at the time in nearby Waco.
Thursday, April 18, 2013

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