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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, April 11, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, April 11, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered First Lady Joins Efforts to Fight Violence in Chicago First lady Michelle Obama will follow in the footsteps of her husband when she returns to her hometown of Chicago to talk about ways to combat youth violence. The president did so after a 15-year-old who had performed in inauguration festivities was killed near his Chicago home earlier this year. Mrs. Obama attended the teenager's funeral, and now she will join city officials to throw her support behind an effort to raise $50 million for community-based programs considered successful in serving at-risk youth.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Climate One: Solar Flares Through all the growing pains and political attacks, the U.S. solar industry is still moving ahead. The founders of three prominent Bay Area startup companies that lease systems to homeowners share their insight on tapping the sun to get off fossil fuels, creating investment opportunities for small investors, and whether natural gas is a good bridge to cleaner power -- or dirty and unnecessary. They also talk about how monopoly utilities are grappling with their customers suddenly becoming competitors. Guests include: Ed Fenster, co-founder of Sunrun; Danny Kennedy, president and founder of Sungevity; Marco Krapels, executive vice president of Rabobank; and Lyndon Rive, co-founder and CEO of SolarCity.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition The Surprising Outcome of Hugo Chavez's Economic Experiment Hugo Chavez drew his strongest support from Venezuela's poor. But after 14 years of presidency, their lives have not improved much - even though the country's banks are showing record profits. The program reports from Venezuela on the surprising outcome of Hugo Chavez's economic experiment.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum SF Housing Authority in Crisis On Tuesday, the San Francisco Housing Authority Commission voted unanimously to fire its embattled chief, Henry Alvarez. Alvarez faces three employee lawsuits and complaints of bullying, as well as a federal investigation into allegations of illegal contracting. We look at the financial emergency confronting the Housing Authority, and the future and state of public housing in California and across the nation.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum David Stockman's 'Doomsday' Scenario In his new book, "The Great Deformation," former Reagan budget director David Stockman says the federal budget has turned into a fiscal "doomsday machine." If the government doesn't stop "cooking the books" and get its debt under control, Stockman predicts a collapse of the U.S. economy. We'll talk to Stockman about his book and get his take on President Obama's proposed 2014 budget, introduced on Wednesday.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Parents, Children, and 'The Talk' Many parents dread it, agonize over where and when, but sooner or later, most sit their kids down for "the talk." For some, it's less about the birds and the bees -- and more about yes and no. The program discusses parents, children and talking about sex.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Laurie Edwards: 'In the Kingdom of the Sick' Host Terry Gross speaks with Laurie Edwards, author of "In the Kingdom of the Sick." She has a rare respiratory disease that wasn't accurately diagnosed until she was 23. Edwards talks about living with chronic illness, how gender biases can effect diagnosis and treatment of chronic disease, and research into gender differences in how people experience pain and metabolize medicines.
  • 2:00 pm
    World 'Sex and the Citadel' If you really want to understand people, ask them what they do in their bedrooms. Author Shereen El Feki asked Egyptians about their sex lives -- and wrote a book on it, called "Sex and the Citadel." He speaks to the program about understanding the sexual lives of men and women in the Middle East.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Egypt's Currency Black Market Like scalpers outside a sports stadium, black market currency traders have found a home on the streets of Egypt. They're after U.S. dollars, but as the program discusses, there's very little to be had.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Climate Change May Mean Bumpier Skies -- A new study predicts increasingly bumpy skies for future air travelers. It finds that over the next 50 years, planes will experience between 10 to 40 percent more turbulence. Melissa Block talks to researcher Paul Williams about the findings.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Egypt's Currency Black Market Like scalpers outside a sports stadium, black market currency traders have found a home on the streets of Egypt. They're after U.S. dollars, but as the program discusses, there's very little to be had.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Laurie Edwards: 'In the Kingdom of the Sick' Host Terry Gross speaks with Laurie Edwards, author of "In the Kingdom of the Sick." She has a rare respiratory disease that wasn't accurately diagnosed until she was 23. Edwards talks about living with chronic illness, how gender biases can effect diagnosis and treatment of chronic disease, and research into gender differences in how people experience pain and metabolize medicines.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials The Computer History Museum Presents The Age of Edison: Electric Light and the Invention of Modern America -- The late 19th century was a period of explosive technological creativity, but arguably the most important invention of all was Thomas Edison's incandescent light bulb. Unveiled in his Menlo Park, New Jersey laboratory in 1879, the light bulb overwhelmed the American public with the sense of the birth of a new age. More than any other invention, the electric light marked the arrival of modernity. However, as author and professor Ernest Freeberg shows, Edison's greatest invention was not any single technology -- but rather his reinvention of the process itself. Freeberg talks with John Hollar about the technological revolution behind Edison's light bulb.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum David Stockman's 'Doomsday' Scenario In his new book, "The Great Deformation," former Reagan budget director David Stockman says the federal budget has turned into a fiscal "doomsday machine." If the government doesn't stop "cooking the books" and get its debt under control, Stockman predicts a collapse of the U.S. economy. We'll talk to Stockman about his book and get his take on President Obama's proposed 2014 budget, introduced on Wednesday.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Meteor From Mercury? A mysterious green rock that fell from space in the desert of Morocco is stirring up controversy among planetary scientists. Based on circumstantial evidence, one researcher believes it is a piece of the planet Mercury -- the first to ever to be found on earth. But other scientists disagree. NPR takes a CSI-style look at the forensic evidence linking the rock to the solar system's innermost planet.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered North Korean Labor the South Depends On North Korea's decision to pull its workers form the Kaesong joint industrial zone this week was a surprise to many observers. The zone is a major source of foreign currency earnings for the North -- and many South Korean companies depend on the relatively cheap labor there. NPR's Frank Langfitt reports from Seoul.
Thursday, April 11, 2013

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