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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, April 9, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, April 9, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Immigration Lobbying in Silicon Valley Tech companies in Silicon Valley are preparing for an all-out fight over immigration reform. It's one of few the times that business leaders in the Valley -- a longtime epicenter for foreign workers -- are really involved with the public policy debate in any coordinated fashion. KQED's Aarti Shahani discusses how lawmakers are telling the Valley elite they've got to ally with Latinos -- but the alliance is proving hard.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) The Iranian Nuclear Crisis: A Roundtable Discussion The Islamic Republic of Iran continues to defy UN Security Council resolutions calling for an end to its uranium enrichment program. Is Iran trying to develop nuclear weapons or does it just want to produce nuclear energy? What would be the likely consequences if Iran does get the bomb? Panelists discussing the issue include: Malfrid Braut-Hegghammer, assistant professor, Norwegian Defense University College; Abbas Milani, Hamid and Christina Moghadam Director of Iranian Studies, Stanford University; and Abraham D. Sofaer, George P. Shultz Distinguished Scholar and senior fellow, Hoover Institution.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Assassinations and the CIA For decades, the CIA was forbidden to kill. Journalist Mark Mazzetti, however, tells the program how that changed after 9/11. His new book, "The Way of the Knife," describes the CIA's use of targeted killings in the war on terror.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Remembering Margaret Thatcher Leaders from around the globe are paying tribute to former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, who died of a stroke this week at age 87. Britain's "Iron Lady" was the country's first female prime minister and one of the 20th Century's most important political figures. But the conservative Thatcher also had many critics, who say her policies hurt workers and the country's economy. We'll discuss Thatcher's life and legacy, including her relationship with the U.S. and President Ronald Reagan.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum A History of Public Art in San Francisco Today, it is nearly impossible to imagine San Francisco's Telegraph Hill without its landmark Coit Tower. But when the San Francisco Arts Commission approved the tower project in the early 1930s, public opinion was sharply divided. For 80 years, the city's arts commission has been at the center of a lively and often stormy debate over taxpayer-funded art. This commission's pivotal role in shaping public art and design is the subject of a new book, "San Francisco: Arts for the City." We'll talk to the author and to the current director of the commission.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Inside the Aryan Brotherhood After the murder of two Kaufman County prosecutors just a couple of months apart, the Aryan Brotherhood of Texas is among the suspects. The notorious white supremacist gang started in prison, and now operates outside as well. The program explores inside the Aryan Brotherhood -- its structure, sources of income, and violent history,
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Sandy Hook's Effect on School Policy While Congress, states and local governments debate new measures on guns after the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary, many schools have considered changed policies. One county in Pennsylvania is looking for armed school guards, and Marietta, Georgia has installed panic buttons in classrooms. The program asks: What is happening at your school?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Musician Jherek Bischoff Composer, musician, and performer Jherek Bischoff joins the program to talk about his new album, "Composed," featuring guest performers David Byrne, Caetano Veloso and Nels Cline. Bischoff got his start playing bass in rock bands and recording albums for his friends. He grew up on a sailboat and his father was the drummer of an avant-garde rock band.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Secret History of Vladimir Nabokov Vladimir Nabokov, the author of "Lolita," lived an intense life -- spanning the last days of imperial Russia, the horrors of the holocaust, and the depths of the Cold War. The program examines the secret history of Vladimir Nabokov.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Government-Led Fight Against Obesity Dropping pounds is easier said than done, but are government-led challenges the right way to slow America's obesity epidemic? The program discusses that issue, and the rest of the day's business headlines.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    U.S. Secretary of Energy Hopeful Ernest Moniz -- A U.S. Senate committee holds a confirmation hearing for Ernest Moniz, who has been nominated to be the U.S. secretary of energy. Moniz says he will retire from MIT, where he's a professor of physics and energy systems. He would advocate for the Obama administration's "all of the above" energy strategy, which calls for continued fossil fuels development and supports nuclear, wind and solar energy. The program discusses the latest on Moniz's confirmation hearing,
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Government-Led Fight Against Obesity Dropping pounds is easier said than done, but are government-led challenges the right way to slow America's obesity epidemic? The program discusses that issue, and the rest of the day's business headlines.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Musician Jherek Bischoff Composer, musician, and performer Jherek Bischoff joins the program to talk about his new album, "Composed," featuring guest performers David Byrne, Caetano Veloso and Nels Cline. Bischoff got his start playing bass in rock bands and recording albums for his friends. He grew up on a sailboat and his father was the drummer of an avant-garde rock band.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg Sheryl Sandberg is chief operating officer at Facebook. She oversees the firm's business operations including sales, marketing, business development, legal, human resources, public policy and communications. Prior to Facebook, Sandberg was vice president of global online sales and operations at Google, where she built and managed online sales for advertising and publishing and operations for consumer products worldwide. She was also instrumental in launching Google.org, Google's philanthropic arm. Sheryl previously served as chief of staff for the U.S. Treasury Department under President Bill Clinton and began her career as an economist with the World Bank. She serves on the boards of Facebook, The Walt Disney Company, Women for Women International, V-Day, ONE and chairs the board of Lean In. Her new book is "Lean In: Woman, Work, and the Will to Lead." She appeared in conversation with Condoleezza Rice, former U.S. secretary of state and faculty member at Stanford University, on April 1, 2013.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum A History of Public Art in San Francisco Today, it is nearly impossible to imagine San Francisco's Telegraph Hill without its landmark Coit Tower. But when the San Francisco Arts Commission approved the tower project in the early 1930s, public opinion was sharply divided. For 80 years, the city's arts commission has been at the center of a lively and often stormy debate over taxpayer-funded art. This commission's pivotal role in shaping public art and design is the subject of a new book, "San Francisco: Arts for the City." We'll talk to the author and to the current director of the commission.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered North Korea Continues its Threats North Korea has urged tourists and foreign companies to leave South Korea for their own safety. It's the latest in a series of threats from Pyongyang, which has again threatened to turn the South Korean capital into a "sea of fire." However, as the program discusses, residents there are remarkably unperturbed.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered A Spotlight on Syria Rezan Chalabi Sham imagined her future as an English professor in Homs, Syria. The 26-year-old comes from one of the wealthiest families in Syria, but the revolution has dramatically changed her life. She has spoken to the National Security Council in Washington, and helps advise the U.S. State Department on worthy projects in Syria. The program shows how, in a revolt that often pits urban Syria against a rural mentality, an individual like Chalabi Sham can talk to both sides.
Tuesday, April 9, 2013

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