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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, March 25, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, March 25, 2013
  • 12:00 am
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA Shaping Immigration Policy How close is immigration reform legislation? How are national and grassroots immigrant advocacy groups mobilizing to shape new policy? The program looks at how security currently works along the US-Mexico border, and discusses the track record of President Obama's nominee for Secretary of Labor is Dominican-American Thomas Perez, one of only two Latino cabinet nominees.
  • 1:30 am
    Cambridge Forum Ending Slavery International human rights worker Kevin Bales continues his discussion of ways to end global slavery and rebuild the lives of 27 million held in slavery today. How have other efforts to bring an end to more than 5,000 years of human bondage fallen short? What would it take to build a successful program to end slavery?
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money Final Year Health Care Ten percent of all health care dollars -- $270 billion -- are spent in the last year of life. The program shares one man's story, Richard Dean, and his struggle to decide what is best for his dying wife Janet. Also, foreign lottery scams are costing some Americans their life savings.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Overcoming Anxiety in Children Some children are always afraid. Not just sometimes -- almost all the time. Their anxiety can trigger outbursts of anger and violence. Now doctors are trying an experimental drug that can calm them in seconds. The program looks at a new hope for children overcome by anxiety and rage.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Supreme Court Hears Same-Sex Marriage Cases On Tuesday, the U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear arguments on Proposition 8, California's voter-approved 2008 ban on same-sex marriage. The following day, the high court will take up the Defense of Marriage Act, which denies federal benefits to legally married same-sex couples. We'll preview the historic hearings.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Amnesty International Head Salil Shetty Salil Shetty grew up with activist parents in India in the 1970s, and he has followed in his family's footsteps. He now heads Amnesty International, the human rights organization that calls attention to the plight of war refugees, political prisoners and others at risk around the world. Salil Shetty joins us to talk about how the group is dealing with rape in India, massacres in Syria and other international issues, as well as its continued call to release prisoners from Guantanamo Bay.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Kids and Food Allergies If it seems like childhood food allergies are more common than they used to be, it is because they are: nearly one in 10 preschoolers have allergies to food, and the rate of such allergies has more than doubled in the past decade. For kids with severe allergies, the condition can restrict normal everyday activities like eating out, and often results in frequent trips to the emergency room. But public awareness is growing, and there are promising developments in research and treatment.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Marriage Laws Head to the Supreme Court Two big social issues will come before the U.S. Supreme Court in the week ahead: the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8, which effectively bans same-sex marriage. The program highlights key moments from the arguments.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Healing Refugees: Physically and Mentally All along Syria's borders, refugees cross to escape the brutality and reported torture. But life in camps carries its own risks and trauma. Psychiatrist James Gordon visited a camp in Jordan, and wondered, "In this moment, what can I possibly offer these people?"
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Evolution of Movie Stardom Host Terry Gross speaks with Ty Burr, film critic for the Boston Globe and author of the new book "Gods Like Us: On Movie Stardom and Modern Fame." The book traces the evolution of movie stardom -- from the silent era on -- and the manipulation by studios to create personas that fans would respond to. Burr also considers what it says about fans who are star-obsessed, and how it affects actors.
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Stepping in for Physicians The program discusses how the number of primary care physicians is not growing fast enough to meet demand, and how nurse practitioners are stepping in to fill the gap.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    New CDC Study on Baby Food -- A new study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that parents are introducing solid foods into their babies' diets -- sometimes far earlier than the recommended age of four to six months. The program speaks with study co-founder Dr. Kelly Scanlon, lead epidemiologist at the nutrition branch of the CDC.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Stepping in for Physicians The program discusses how the number of primary care physicians is not growing fast enough to meet demand, and how nurse practitioners are stepping in to fill the gap.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Evolution of Movie Stardom Host Terry Gross speaks with Ty Burr, film critic for the Boston Globe and author of the new book "Gods Like Us: On Movie Stardom and Modern Fame." The book traces the evolution of movie stardom -- from the silent era on -- and the manipulation by studios to create personas that fans would respond to. Burr also considers what it says about fans who are star-obsessed, and how it affects actors.
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Resilience and Transformation in Haiti From Haiti's revolutionary history, to its totalitarian dynasty that ruled for decades, to the 2010 earthquake, this island nation has become synonymous with poverty and dysfunction. Yet through it all shines a people's creative culture and resilience. During her three decades covering the country, journalist and Haitian expert Amy Wilentz has seen Haitians overcome all kinds of hardship. Still struggling to rebuild from the 2010 earthquake, Haiti now finds itself awash with well-meaning, and sometimes misguided, characters: movie stars turned aid workers, musicians running for president, and a former US president working as a house builder. Wilentz will explore the evolution of Haiti's vibrant culture and dysfunctional government.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Kids and Food Allergies If it seems like childhood food allergies are more common than they used to be, it is because they are: nearly one in 10 preschoolers have allergies to food, and the rate of such allergies has more than doubled in the past decade. For kids with severe allergies, the condition can restrict normal everyday activities like eating out, and often results in frequent trips to the emergency room. But public awareness is growing, and there are promising developments in research and treatment.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered The Pentagon's 'Practical' Need for Women in Ground Combat Pentagon officials say they're opening ground combat jobs to women to provide more equality in the workplace. But there's another reason -- they need them. Women are better recruits because they have fewer brushes with the law and fewer drug problems, and more women have high school degrees. The chairman of the Joint Chiefs, General Martin Dempsey, acknowledges the decision to lift the ban on women in combat is "a very practical matter."
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The Pope and the Economy The new Pope is both an anti-Marxist who opposed leftist political movements and a humble friend of the poor who has criticized global capitalism. In fact, his positions are in line with those of his predecessors on economic matters -- suspicious of any ideology that views humans as economic actors alone. However, many who follow the church say he will be better than Pope Benedict at getting the Church's message across on economic issues.
Monday, March 25, 2013

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