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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, March 1, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, March 1, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Shale Gas Study A new study of the Barnett Shale formation in Texas shows that the natural gas produced there will last for decades. And that means gas production will remain strong around the country, if prices don't get too low.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials American RadioWorks An Imperfect Revolution: Voices From the Desegregation Era -- The 1970s saw a tidal change in American race relations. For the first time, large numbers of white, black and other children of color began attending school together. It was an experience that shaped them for life. Using first-person accounts of the era of "forced busing," the program explores the ways school desegregation changed the nation.
  • 3:30 am
    Morning Edition Meeting Vermeer's 'Woman in Blue' When Vermeer painted "Woman in Blue Reading a Letter," he ground up semi-precious stones to create the shimmering blue. The newly restored painting is making one stop in the U.S. on loan from the Netherlands. NPR's Susan Stamberg meets the "Woman in Blue."
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 7:00 am
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List This week we're asking "why?" and visiting the Secret Garden.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Obama Administration Urges Court to Strike Down Prop. 8 The Obama Administration has filed a brief with the U.S. Supreme Court arguing that California's voter-approved ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional. We discuss the administration's legal stance on the issue and its potential impact on the court, as well as efforts nationwide to legalize same-sex marriage.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Study Reveals Genetic Ties to Mental Disorders A new study reveals previously unknown genetic links between five psychiatric illnesses, including schizophrenia and ADHD. Scientists say the discovery could lead to new treatments, and affect how the diseases are classified.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum A National Day of Unplugging On Friday evening, people across the country will turn off their cell phones and laptops to observe the fourth annual National Day of Unplugging. The event is part of the growing "slow tech" movement, which promotes mindful and balanced use of technology. We'll discuss why you might need a break from your electronics, and the best ways to unplug.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Who Will Pay for Asteroid Tracking? Host Ira Flatow talks with Congressman Lamar Smith, chair of the House Committee on Science, Space and Technology. He's been vocal about the need to study and track asteroids -- but where's the money? And how will science be affected as the sequester deadline passes?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday The Skinny on Whole Grains What's the difference between whole wheat, stone-ground and multi-grain? The show takes a look at what's really whole grain, and what isn't. And are whole grains any healthier than ground-up ones?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Filmmaker Robert Zemeckis Dave Davies talks with film director, producer and screenwriter Robert Zemeckis. His film "Flight" which stars Denzel Washington, who was nominated for an Academy Award for his performance as a heroic pilot who is also an alcoholic, is now out on DVD. Zemeckis also directed the "Back to the Future" films, the Academy Award-winning film "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," and he won an Academy Award for directing of the film "Forrest Gump."
  • 2:00 pm
    World Running on Sacred Ground An Egyptian-American has run marathons in all 50 states. Now he's running one in Israel: the Jerusalem Marathon. It's a 26.2-mile race through the streets of a city considered holy by three religions.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Weekly Wrap Host Kai Ryssdal and two business journalists break down the latest on sequester and the week's biggest business news.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine A UC Davis study out this week found a "disturbing" achievement gap between California's Latino and African-American community college students and their Asian and white peers. Now, a Cal State University program is working to reach African-American students and their families before they get to college -- by bringing its recruitment effort to church.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Sequester Day at the White House -- Congress failed to reach an agreement on the spending cuts known as the sequester -- and now they are out of time. On Friday morning, Congressional leaders from both parties met at the White House. Afterward, House Speaker John Boehner made it clear that Republicans won't budge on taxes.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine A UC Davis study out this week found a "disturbing" achievement gap between California's Latino and African-American community college students and their Asian and white peers. Now, a Cal State University program is working to reach African-American students and their families before they get to college -- by bringing its recruitment effort to church.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Filmmaker Robert Zemeckis Dave Davies talks with film director, producer and screenwriter Robert Zemeckis. His film "Flight" which stars Denzel Washington, who was nominated for an Academy Award for his performance as a heroic pilot who is also an alcoholic, is now out on DVD. Zemeckis also directed the "Back to the Future" films, the Academy Award-winning film "Who Framed Roger Rabbit," and he won an Academy Award for directing of the film "Forrest Gump."
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club President Jimmy Carter Jimmy Carter's tenure as president was marked by some of the greatest challenges facing the country in the late 20th century: an energy crisis and a troubled relationship with Iran, issues that are still relevant today. Significant foreign policy accomplishments of Carter's administration included the Panama Canal treaties, the Camp David Accords, the treaty of peace between Egypt and Israel, the SALT II treaty with the Soviet Union and the establishment of U.S. diplomatic relations with the People's Republic of China. He championed human rights throughout the world. In 1982, he became University Distinguished Professor at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, and founded The Carter Center. Actively guided by President Carter, the nonpartisan and nonprofit center addresses national and international issues of public policy.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum A National Day of Unplugging On Friday evening, people across the country will turn off their cell phones and laptops to observe the fourth annual National Day of Unplugging. The event is part of the growing "slow tech" movement, which promotes mindful and balanced use of technology. We'll discuss why you might need a break from your electronics, and the best ways to unplug.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine A UC Davis study out this week found a "disturbing" achievement gap between California's Latino and African-American community college students and their Asian and white peers. Now, a Cal State University program is working to reach African-American students and their families before they get to college -- by bringing its recruitment effort to church.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered On the Run: Food is Love An NPR survey found a significant role for food as a social and emotional component of daily life. About half of kids live in a household where family celebrations are a time to set aside worry about overeating. And more than a quarter of kids live in households where parents think food is an important way to show affection. We take a look at why these connections persist when scarcity -- which presumably made food precious and a matter for celebration in less affluent times -- is no longer driving our feelings about food. Some of the answers are in the brain.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered American Capitalist Offends French Workers There's a battle of stereotypes in France between American hardcore capitalist Morry Taylor and the socialist government's Minister of Industrial Renewal Arnaud Montebourg. Taylor, CEO of Illinois-based Titan Tires, was supposed to be in talks to buy an ailing tire plant in France. But in a leaked letter, Taylor said one would have to be crazy to buy a plant where workers toiled only three hours a day and spent the rest on coffee breaks. Montebourg called Taylor's comments extremist and insulting.
Friday, March 1, 2013

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