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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, February 11, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, February 11, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    Tech Nation Daniel Pink Hear a conversation with Daniel Pink, author of "To Sell is Human - The Surprising Truth about Moving Others."
  • 1:00 am
    Cambridge Forum What's the Economy for Anyway? Activist, author and film-maker John de Graaf looks beyond the current downturn to explore the assumptions underlying our economy. His book "What's the Economy For, Anyway?" offers a fresh perspective on quality of life, health, security, work-life balance, leisure, social justice, and perhaps most important, sustainability. How can we measure economic success? Nationally? Individually? What is the role of growth in a 21st-century economy? What role can governments play in creating economic success? What is the individual's role?
  • 1:30 am
    Latino USA When Border Patrol Crosses the Line A new report by the immigrant rights group Families for Freedom and the New York University School of Law Immigrant Rights Clinic found that Border Patrol agents were making unlawful arrests alongside the US-Canada border. We speak to co-author and New York University School of Law professor Nancy Morawetz about the report's findings.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Money Finding 'the One' This week on Marketplace Money, dating websites rake in millions of dollars with membership fees but is online dating worth the price tag? Marketplace Money explores the costs of finding "the one."
  • 3:00 am
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Obama's Second Term and the State of the Union On Thursday, President Obama told House Democrats that his top priority is job creation. But what else will he focus on in his second term? We'll preview Obama's State of the Union Address. What do you wish the president would say on issues such as national security, unemployment and education?
  • 10:00 am
    Forum First Person: Rhodessa Jones Performer, teacher and theater director Rhodessa Jones has spent her rich and varied career merging social activism and theater. In the late 1980s she founded the widely acclaimed Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women, which in recent years has been exploring the stories of women living with HIV. Jones was recently presented with the San Francisco Mayor's Art Award. We talk with Rhodessa Jones as part of our First Person series on the leaders, innovators and others who make the Bay Area unique.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Defense Budget As the sequester looms, former Pentagon official Michele Flournoy joins us to break down the defense budget.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday America's New Boomtowns Natural gas and oil are booming, and in some small towns like Williston, North Dakota, that means unemployment is low. Really low. Hear about he ups and downs of America's new boomtowns.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Charlie LeDuff Fresh Air talks with journalist Charlie LeDuff about his home town of Detroit. He writes about it in his new book, "Detroit: An American Autopsy."
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Public Safety in Chicago In the most violent neighborhoods of Chicago, public safety is a top priority. And that means economic development suffers.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Income Inequality and the State of the Union -- President Obama is expected focus on middle-class job growth and the economy in his State of the Union address Tuesday night. And while the president has fought to make the tax code more progressive, broader efforts to address income inequality could be an uphill battle at a time when the government seems bent on tightening its belt.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Public Safety in Chicago In the most violent neighborhoods of Chicago, public safety is a top priority. And that means economic development suffers.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Charlie LeDuff Fresh Air talks with journalist Charlie LeDuff about his home town of Detroit. He writes about it in his new book, "Detroit: An American Autopsy."
  • 8:00 pm
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Cuba: Paradox Island The last four years, in comparison to the previous fifty, have seen considerable change in Cuba. In 2008, Fidel Castro stepped aside to allow his brother Raul to lead. At the same time, after a period of tight travel restrictions, the United States has made it easier for Cuban Americans to visit family and for Americans to travel legally to Cuba on cultural exchanges. This fall, President Raul Castro announced an impending end to much reviled exit visas Cubans must obtain in order to leave their own country legally for travel or work. These changes, along with experimental encouragement of private enterprise within Cuba, have renewed interest in the country and its relationship with the United States.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum First Person: Rhodessa Jones Performer, teacher and theater director Rhodessa Jones has spent her rich and varied career merging social activism and theater. In the late 1980s she founded the widely acclaimed Medea Project: Theater for Incarcerated Women, which in recent years has been exploring the stories of women living with HIV. Jones was recently presented with the San Francisco Mayor's Art Award. We talk with Rhodessa Jones as part of our First Person series on the leaders, innovators and others who make the Bay Area unique.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Maker's Mark Watered Down The popular bourbon brand Maker's Mark says it plans to reduce the alcohol in its drink to help meet demand. The Kentucky-based distiller made the announcement over the weekend.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The History of Papal Resignations In light of the Pope Benedict XVI's resignation, Melissa Block speaks with Father Thomas Worcester from the College of the Holy Cross about the rarity of papal resignations and the "Western Schism" that last caused a Pope to step down in 1415.
Monday, February 11, 2013

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