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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, January 24, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, January 24, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Boeing 787s and the FAA The world's entire fleet of Boeing 787s remains grounded. Investigators in the U.S. and Japan remain perplexed as to why batteries on two planes suffered serious failures. As NPR's Wendy Kaufman reports -- Boeing, its flagship airplane, and the certification process are now under intense scrutiny.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials TED Radio Hour Africa: The Next Chapter -- There are many stereotypes about Africa: that it's a place of conflict, disease, war and famine. Or that it's a single place at all, rather than a continent of 54 distinct countries. The program engages with thinkers and doers who are constructing new realities for their respective countries, and for the African continent a whole.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Petraeus' Successes and Failures on the Battlefield As a young officer, David Petraeus explored new theories about fighting insurgencies. As a general, he put those strategies into effect in Iraq and Afghanistan. Journalist Fred Kaplan discusses his new book about how Petraeus succeeded, and how he failed.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    The California Report The California Report The State of the State -- The California Report presents live coverage of Governor Jerry Brown's State of the State Address before a joint session of the California Legislature. Guests joining host Rachael Myrow for commentary and analysis include Anthony York, political reporter in the Sacramento bureau of the Los Angeles Times; Joe Simitian, former state senator now serving on the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors; Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan, chairwoman of the Assembly Education Committee; Assemblyman Jeff Gorell, vice chair of the Assembly Budget Committee; Assemblywoman Connie Conway, Assembly Republican leader; Anthony Wright, executive director of Health Access, a consumer advocacy group; and Dean Vogel, president of the California Teachers' Association.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Rethinking Nuclear Weapons Former secretaries of state Henry Kissinger and George Shultz called for an end to nuclear weapons a few years ago, but the movement failed to gain a foothold. So why do countries continue to spend billions of dollars to modernize and expand their nuclear arsenals? What would make nuclear disarmament possible? Ward Wilson joins us to talk about his book, "Five Myths About Nuclear Weapons."
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday John Kerry and Diplomacy Decorated veteran, long-time senator from Massachusetts, former presidential candidate and occasional diplomatic troubleshooter John Kerry is now nominated to be secretary of state. As Kerry's confirmation hearings get underway, do different times call for different kinds of diplomacy?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Amnesia: The Self That Remains Who we are seems inextricably connected to the things we've done, the places we've been, the choices we've made and the people we've known. So what happens when a tumor, an accident or a disease steals your memories? Author Daniel Levitin joins Neal Conan to discuss his recent Atlantic article "Amnesia and the Self That Remains When Memory Is Lost."
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Scientology and the Prison of Belief Terry Gross discusses the founder of scientology, L Ron Hubbard, with Lawrence Wright, author of the new book "Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief." Wright won a Pulitzer Prize for his book "The Looming Tower" about the history of al-Qaida.
  • 2:00 pm
    World A Twitter Strike on Drones Nigerian-American author Teju Cole's seven short story tweets about drones have gone viral. They're quick hits, in the style of Herman Melville and Virginia Woolf, to humanize the victims of drone attacks in Pakistan, Yemen or Somalia.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace How Will History Judge the Bank Bailout? Host Kai Ryssdal talks to former Federal Reserve governor Alan Blinder about how history will remember the government bailout of the banks and the federal stimulus.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Sierra Club and Civil Disobedience -- Melissa Block speaks with Michael Brune, executive director of the Sierra Club, about the approved one-time use of peaceful civil disobedience for the first time in the group's history. They will be participating in a climate rally in February in Washington, D.C.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace How Will History Judge the Bank Bailout? Host Kai Ryssdal talks to former Federal Reserve governor Alan Blinder about how history will remember the government bailout of the banks and the federal stimulus.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Scientology and the Prison of Belief Terry Gross discusses the founder of scientology, L Ron Hubbard, with Lawrence Wright, author of the new book "Going Clear: Scientology, Hollywood, and the Prison of Belief." Wright won a Pulitzer Prize for his book "The Looming Tower" about the history of al-Qaida.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Computer History Museum Presents: An Evening With Elon Musk Elon Musk is living two ultimate boyhood fantasies: creating a sports car company and a rocket launch corporation. As a PayPal co-founder, Musk helped transform online payment systems and then, like a true revolutionary, set his sights on electric cars and space transport. Today, Musk is CEO of both Tesla Motors and SpaceX. He also serves as chairman of SolarCity, the solar power provider. In 2008, Musk was named as one of the 75 most influential people of the 21st century by Esquire magazine. One year later, the National Space Society awarded Musk their Von Braun Trophy, given for leadership of the most significant achievement in space. In 2010, Musk was the youngest recipient of the Auto Executive of the Year Innovator Award and was listed as one of Time Magazine's 100 of the World's Most Influential People. Alison van Diggelen of Fresh Dialogues talks with Musk about what inspired his entrepreneurial journey from South Africa to Silicon Valley. How does he manage to lead two ground-breaking companies simultaneously? Why does he believe that electric cars are a vital component in the move away from oil to a more sustainable energy economy? And what is behind his fascination with creating a multi-planetary future for mankind, including a self-sustaining base on Mars?
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Rethinking Nuclear Weapons Former secretaries of state Henry Kissinger and George Shultz called for an end to nuclear weapons a few years ago, but the movement failed to gain a foothold. So why do countries continue to spend billions of dollars to modernize and expand their nuclear arsenals? What would make nuclear disarmament possible? Ward Wilson joins us to talk about his book, "Five Myths About Nuclear Weapons."
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report The California Report Special Presentation with Rachael Myrow The State of the State -- The California Report presents coverage of Governor Jerry Brown's State of the State Address before a joint session of the California Legislature. Guests joining host Rachael Myrow for commentary and analysis include Anthony York, political reporter in the Sacramento bureau of the Los Angeles Times; Joe Simitian, former state senator now serving on the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors; Assemblywoman Joan Buchanan, chairwoman of the Assembly Education Committee; Assemblyman Jeff Gorell, vice chair of the Assembly Budget Committee; Assemblywoman Connie Conway, Assembly Republican leader; Anthony Wright, executive director of Health Access, a consumer advocacy group; and Dean Vogel, president of the California Teachers' Association.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Union Membership Decline The share of the American work force that belongs to a labor union has hit a 97-year low. Today only 11.3 percent of workers hold a union membership. Labor expert Tony Canavale of Georgetown University's Center on Education and the Workforce says the federal government has replaced the labor union for many American workers, in pushing for health and safety regulations, minimum wage legislation and equal pay.
Thursday, January 24, 2013

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