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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Saturday, January 12, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, January 12, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Coal's Decline Georgia Power has announced plans to close 15 coal and oil-fired power plants. It's just the latest in a string of announcements as the nation makes a major shift from coal to natural gas as a primary source of electricity. The trend is being pushed by low-prices for natural gas and by Environmental Protection Agency regulations aimed at cleaning up exhausts from old coal-fired power plants that harm people's health. Companies are deciding it's cheaper to shift to gas or even wind and solar than to install pollution controls on old coal plants. Energy experts expect this trend to continue. It's already helping to reduce the country's greenhouse gas emissions.
  • 1:00 am
    This Week in Northern California Assemblymember Nancy Skinner A new bill to regulate and track ammunition in California is one of several legislative proposals being pushed in the wake of the mass shooting in Newton, CT. On Monday, Assemblymember Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) unveiled a so-called "bullet bill" that would require the licensing of ammunition sellers and the creation of a state justice department registry to track sales.
  • 2:00 am
    Commonwealth Club Politicizing Science How did climate science become so politicized? Just a few years ago, Senators John McCain and Lindsay Graham were among conservatives who accepted the basic physics of heat trapping gases and the need to decouple carbon pollution from economic growth. Today, many candidates claim the science is unsettled and scientists are the targets of smear campaigns. The program's guests include Michael Mann, professor of geosciences at Penn State and author of "The Hockey Stick and the Climate Wars"; Katharine Hayhoe, professor of atmospheric sciences at Texas Tech University; and Terry Root, senior fellow at the Woods Institute for the Environment at Stanford University.
  • 3:00 am
    Inside Europe Asylum Seekers Protest in Vienna In the Austrian capital Vienna, a group of asylum seekers is occupying a large Gothic church near the centre of the city. Around 40 of the protesters are on hunger strike. Among their list of demands are better accommodation for refugees, an end to deportations and a faster and fairer asylum process. The protest is now entering its fourth week and there's no end in sight.
  • 4:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) U.S. Foreign Policy in 2013 and Beyond The election is finally over, so we can put all the posturing and heated campaign rhetoric behind us. What's ahead for foreign policy now that the presidency has been settled? What did we forget to talk about in the course of an election year that will now roar back onto the front pages, from China's new leadership to the advent of the cyber war era? The show's guest is Susan Glasser, editor-in-chief for Foreign Policy magazine. She will discuss what she expects will be on the foreign policy agenda in 2013.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Weekend Edition
    Perspectives7:36am & 8:36am

  • 9:00 am
  • 10:00 am
    Car Talk Click and Clack tackle the tougher questions of the automobile world.
  • 11:00 am
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    This American Life Self-Improvement Kick A perfectly normal guy gets rid of everything he owns, changes his name, says goodbye to his friends -- and begins walking in the name of peace. And Honduran government officials try to heal their corrupt country by starting a perfect city, from scratch. For the New Year, the show presents stories about how far some people go in hopes of a better life.
  • 1:00 pm
    Radio Specials American Radio Works Say It Loud -- Public speechmaking has played a powerful role in the long struggle by African-Americans for equal rights. This special program highlights speeches by an eclectic mix of black leaders. Their impassioned, eloquent words continue to affect the ideas of a nation and the direction of history. This anthology illuminates the ideas and debates pulsing through the black freedom struggle from the 1960s to the present. These arguments are suffused with basic questions about what it means to be black in America.
  • 2:00 pm
    Moyers & Company Paul Krugman on Jack Lew Our current obsession with slashing the deficit is getting in the way of real work that needs to be done to preserve both our economy and our democracy. It's all about jobs, says Paul Krugman, who joins Bill Moyers. The Nobel Prize-winning economist and New York Times columnist discusses President Obama's choice for treasury secretary, Jack Lew, as well as his reaction to public support for Krugman himself in that job.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Living On Earth Insurance Costs and Extreme Weather Last year was the hottest year ever recorded in the United States, as well as one of the most costly in terms of weather disasters like Hurricane Sandy. Ernst Rauch, head of the Corporate Climate Center for reinsurance company Munich Re tells host Steve Curwood that insurance companies are taking note of an increase in claims as a result of climate change.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    A Prairie Home Companion From San Francisco The show presents another broadcast from the War Memorial Opera House in San Francisco. Special guests include male vocal ensemble Chanticleer and singer-songwriter-fiddler Sara Watkins.
  • 8:00 pm
    Selected Shorts Compulsions John Lithgow reads "The Monkey's Paw" by W.W. Jacobs; and Lisa Fugard reads "Two Words" by Isabel Allende.
  • 9:00 pm
    This American Life Self-Improvement Kick A perfectly normal guy gets rid of everything he owns, changes his name, says goodbye to his friends -- and begins walking in the name of peace. And Honduran government officials try to heal their corrupt country by starting a perfect city, from scratch. For the New Year, the show presents stories about how far some people go in hopes of a better life.
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    Wait, Wait Don't Tell Me This quiz show takes a fresh, fast-paced and irreverent look at the week's events. NPR veteran newscaster Carl Kassell is the program's judge, scorekeeper, and quiz show impersonator extraordinaire.
  • 12:00 am
Saturday, January 12, 2013

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Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.