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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Thursday, January 3, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Thursday, January 3, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Business Community Reacts to Fiscal Deal Throughout the fiscal cliff drama, business leaders pressed Washington for a deal. But the limited nature of the bill that passed is unlikely to make many business leaders happy. NPR's Yuki Noguchi reports.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Intelligence Squared U.S. Should End-of-Life Care Be Rationed? -- Just because we can extend life, should we? If health care is a scarce resource, limited by its availability and our ability to pay for it, should government step in to ration care? In other words, how much is an extra month of life worth? The Oxford-style debate program takes on these questions. For: Dr. Art Kellermann, Chair in Policy Analysis, RAND Health; and Peter Singer, Ira W. DeCamp Professor of Bioethics, Princeton UniversityAgainst: Sally Pipes, President and Chief Executive Officer, Pacific Research Institute (based in San Francisco, CA); and Ken Connor, Chairman, Center for a Just Society
  • 3:00 am
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Rape and Sexual Harassment in India Thousands of people have been taking to the streets in India to protest the brutal gang rape and subsequent death of a 23-year-old woman. The attack has highlighted conditions for Indian women, many of whom complain that rampant sexual harassment and even rape often go unpunished. We talk with a panel of local Indian-American women about the incident.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Charles Phan on Home Cooking Charles Phan fled Vietnam with his family during the fall of Saigon when he was just a boy. But he didn't leave behind his love of Vietnamese cuisine. The award-winning chef and owner of The Slanted Door restaurant joins us to talk about his new book, "Vietnamese Home Cooking." He also shares secrets of creating high-end ethnic cuisine, and how he stays true to his roots in the kitchen.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Mike Shuster Exit Interview Over the years, NPR diplomatic correspondent Mike Shuster took listeners into the deliberations at the Security Council, to Berlin at the Fall of the Wall, inside Iraq during the worst of the war and to Israel during conflicts with the Palestinians and Hezbollah. As he prepares to leave, Mike Shuster joins host Neal Conan.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday On 'How to Be a Woman' Caitlin Moran ventured into uncharted territory when she wrote a laugh-out-loud book about feminism and the disconnect between image and reality. She says, "Women's existences are completely different to what they're projecting and what they're willing to talk about, and that's absolutely bizarre." Moran joins Neal Conan to discuss her book, "How To Be A Woman."
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Islamic Extremism in North Mali Terry Gross talks with journalist Adam Nossiter, West Africa bureau chief for The New York Times based in Dakar, Senegal. He's been covering the presence of al-Qaida and other Islamic extremist groups in North Mali. He says al-Qaida holds their largest territory there.
  • 2:00 pm
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace 'Promised Land' Review Two corporate salespeople visit a rural town in an attempt to buy drilling rights from the local residents. The show gets a review of the new movie "Promised Land."
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Boehner Reelected Speaker -- Ohio Congressman John Boehner held onto his gavel after winning re-election as speaker of the U.S. House. Many conservative Republicans had been unhappy with Boehner for going along with the recent fiscal cliff compromise, but in the end most voted for him.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace 'Promised Land' Review Two corporate salespeople visit a rural town in an attempt to buy drilling rights from the local residents. The show gets a review of the new movie "Promised Land."
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Islamic Extremism in North Mali Terry Gross talks with journalist Adam Nossiter, West Africa bureau chief for The New York Times based in Dakar, Senegal. He's been covering the presence of al-Qaida and other Islamic extremist groups in North Mali. He says al-Qaida holds their largest territory there.
  • 8:00 pm
    Radio Specials Climate One James Hansen 'Storms of My Grandchildren' -- NASA climatologist James Hansen has grown increasingly concerned about the risks of climatic tipping points which could bring catastrophic consequences. His recent research identifies human fingerprints on specific instances of extreme weather such as Superstorm Sandy, putting him out in front of many of his peers. In 1989, Dr. Hansen was the first person to testify before Congress about global warming. Currently the world's preeminent climate scientist, James Hansen is head of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, adjunct professor at Columbia University's Earth Institute and author of "Storms of My Grandchildren."
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Rape and Sexual Harassment in India Thousands of people have been taking to the streets in India to protest the brutal gang rape and subsequent death of a 23-year-old woman. The attack has highlighted conditions for Indian women, many of whom complain that rampant sexual harassment and even rape often go unpunished. We talk with a panel of local Indian-American women about the incident.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Are You Changing Quicker Than You Think? New research in the journal Science suggests that people aren't aware of how much they will change in the next decade of their lives. Teenagers, middle-aged people and older people all recognize that they have changed a lot in the past -- but all think they will change relatively little in the future. People at all ages think that "the pace of personal change has slowed to a crawl and they have recently become the people they will remain.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Student Hunger During the Holidays Taking a break for the holidays is something most students love. But for some, being home means being hungry. Millions of students in the U.S. get free or reduced price meals at school. So when school is out, they eat less.
Thursday, January 3, 2013

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