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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, November 13, 2012

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, November 13, 2012
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The World's Fastest Computer Titan, the new supercomputer at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in Tennessee, has been crowned the fastest in the world. It can clock 17.59 petaflops (quadrillions of calculations per second). Audie Cornish talks to Steve Henn for more.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Burma: A New Way Forward? Burma is back in the international spotlight with a string of important events and domestic reforms, most notably the release of pro-democracy opposition leader and Nobel Peace Prize-winner Aung San Suu Kyi. Many hope that Burma is finally on the cusp of true democratic change after recent reforms undertaken by the ruling military junta, despite being plagued by poverty, sectarian violence and accusations of human rights abuses. The program presents a panel discussion of the current state of affairs in Burma.
  • 3:00 am
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Morning Edition The Cost of Silence in Chicago The violent crime rate is rising in Chicago, but the arrest rate is going down. Police say one reason is people won't snitch. Some witnesses are afraid to talk, and some victims want to take matters into their own hands.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Calif. Carbon Market Set to Open California is taking a closely watched step to cut greenhouse gas emissions through a new cap-and-trade program. On Wednesday, the state will open a carbon market that forces its biggest polluters to buy and sell permits to emit carbon dioxide. Some say cap-and-trade here could become either a model or a cautionary tale for others.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum 'The American Nurse' "Touch has the power to heal." That's what photographer Carolyn Jones says she discovered when she interviewed nurses across the country for her new book, "The American Nurse." She met nurses who worked with prisoners and amputee veterans, who cared for some of the first AIDS patients, and who survived Hurricane Katrina. She spoke with over 70 nurses, including the nurse who changed Carolyn's own life when she battled breast cancer.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday What Went Wrong in Benghazi Since Ambassador Chris Stevens and three more Americans died in an attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi, Libya, questions have swirled about how it could have happened -- and about whose job it is to ensure state department employees' safety. The show discusses diplomatic security and what went wrong in Benghazi.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Who Hunts, and Why? When you think of a "hunter," what comes to mind? A burly guy in a blaze orange cap? Or a former New York City denizen in her mid-twenties who thanks her prey? What about a former vegan looking for more protein? The show explores who hunts now, and why.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Colo., Wash. Voters Legalize Pot On Election Day last Tuesday, Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Terry Gross talks with Tony Dokoupil, author of Newsweek's recent cover story about Colorado and the new pot barons. He's currently writing a book about marijuana. In the 2009 feature "My Father the Drug Dealer," Dokoupil described how his father smuggled and distributed millions of dollars in marijuana in the U.S. in the '70s and '80s.
  • 2:00 pm
    World America's War in Yemen Maybe you've heard of the kill list of al-Qaeda leaders in Yemen. It's said to contain just 10 to 15 names. But the U.S. carried out more than 35 drone strikes in Yemen this year alone. The show gets an update on America's war in Yemen.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace In North Carolina, Google to the Rescue? When manufacturers moved out of one North Carolina county, they were left with a 17 percent unemployment rate. And then Google built a data center there.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm & 6pm


    California's Climate Gamble -- On Wednesday, California will auction off the right to emit carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. It's the prelude to the country's first "cap-and-trade" program meant to limit global warming. Hundreds of big companies will get both free and auctioned permits, and may have to buy more if they can't cut their own pollution. It's a complicated new world for industry and many are struggling to figure out how it will affect their bottom line.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace In North Carolina, Google to the Rescue? When manufacturers moved out of one North Carolina county, they were left with a 17 percent unemployment rate. And then Google built a data center there.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Colo., Wash. Voters Legalize Pot On Election Day last Tuesday, Colorado and Washington became the first states to legalize marijuana for recreational use. Terry Gross talks with Tony Dokoupil, author of Newsweek's recent cover story about Colorado and the new pot barons. He's currently writing a book about marijuana. In the 2009 feature "My Father the Drug Dealer," Dokoupil described how his father smuggled and distributed millions of dollars in marijuana in the U.S. in the '70s and '80s.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Nick Hornby British writer Nick Hornby made his debut in 1992 with the autobiographical "Fever Pitch," which chronicled his adventures as an obsessed fan of the Arsenal Football Club. Since then, Hornby has written four other books of nonfiction, including numerous articles and critical pieces, and seven novels, including "High Fidelity" and "About a Boy" -- both made into major motion pictures. Hornby also wrote the screenplay for the widely acclaimed 2009 film, "An Education." His new book "More Baths, Less Talking" is a collection of his long-running column for The Believer magazine, "Stuff I've Been Reading." Nick Hornby appeared in conversation with Judson True on October 24, 2012.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Calif. Carbon Market Set to Open California is taking a closely watched step to cut greenhouse gas emissions through a new cap-and-trade program. On Wednesday, the state will open a carbon market that forces its biggest polluters to buy and sell permits to emit carbon dioxide. Some say cap-and-trade here could become either a model or a cautionary tale for others.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Petraeus, Allen Scandal The scandal that forced CIA Director David Petraeus to resign last week just got more complicated. The Pentagon revealed on Tuesday that the U.S. commander in Afghanistan, General John Allen, had email communications with a woman connected to the Petraeus case. The FBI referred the Allen e-mails to the Defense Department's inspector general.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Labor and the Fiscal Cliff Audie Cornish talks to Mary Kay Henry, president of Service Employees International Union (SEIU), about Tuesday's conference call between President Obama and union leaders about the "fiscal cliff." The SEIU and other groups maintain that tax cuts for the middle class must be extended and that richer Americans must pay more taxes. They say the president expressed his support and commitment in their meeting today.
Tuesday, November 13, 2012

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