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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, November 24, 2009

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, November 24, 2009
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered News Corp and Microsoft Rupert Murdoch's News Corp is working on a deal with Microsoft that might take News Corp content off of Google and put it exclusively on Bing, Microsoft's search engine. That means that if you do a Google search, content from a News Corp outlet, such as the Wall Street Journal or Fox News, would not show up.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    It's Your World (a broadcast of the World Affairs Council) Next Generation Philanthropy -- Strategy and Innovation The program presents a panel discussion from the Global Philanthropy Forum's 2009 annual conference. The Global Philanthropy Forum, a project of the World Affairs Council, aims to build a community of donors and social investors committed to international causes, and to inform, enable and enhance the strategic nature of their giving and social investing. Panelists include Mark R. Kramer, managing director of FSG Social Impact Advisors; Paul Brest, president of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; Sandy Herz, senior advancement officer at the Skoll Foundation; Akwasi Aidoo, founding executive director of TrustAfrica; and Sonal Shah of the White House Office of Social Innovation.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Old Holiday Recipes Chris Kimball of America's Test Kitchen discusses some very old holiday recipes. Some are surprisingly delicious, like nineteenth-century mince pie, made with real minced meat. But others probably look better than they taste, like mock plum pudding from the 1950s.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum California's Beleaguered Budget The four-month-old California state budget is already out of balance by at least $6.3 billion, according to the nonpartisan California Legislative Analyst. This hour, we take up California's fiscal outlook.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Books for the Holidays John McMurtrie, book editor for the San Francisco Chronicle, and host Michael Krasny elicit listener recommendations of the best books for that elusive quiet moment during the flurry of this year's holiday season.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Rationing Health Care How should we decide which treatments patients get and who should pay from them? The series on the pros and cons of health care rationing continues.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Deadly Driving Last year 37,000 people died doing something many people do every day -- riding in their cars. In a week when millions of Americans are on the road, host Neal Conan and his guests look at why the number is so high, and what we're willing to sacrifice in order to get where we're going.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Family Author Jeff Sharlet discusses his newest book, "The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power," about a secretive fellowship of conservative Christian politicians.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Honduran Election Ousted Honduran President Manuel Zelaya is still holed up in the Brazilian embassy, and he may not be able to return to power before his term ends. Meanwhile, those who overthrew him have a new project: a presidential election this Sunday, with no involvement from Zelaya. Critics are calling the election a sham.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 3:57 pm
    California Money Signs of Housing Recovery / New Tunnel Boon to Oakland Port Home prices in three major metropolitan areas in California are showing signs of sustained growth according to a monthly index released today. The Standard and Poor's Case-Schiller home price index is a composite of 20 U.S. cities. Also, Union Pacific Railroad has just opened a Donner Pass Tunnel designed to carry goods to and from the Port of Oakland faster and more efficiently than the old route.
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Scroogenomics If you think it's the thought that counts when giving a gift, then you haven't been talking to enough economists. Host Kai Ryssdal discusses Scroogenomics.
  • 4:30 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:04 pm
    California Money KQED Radio News daily business and economics newscast.
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Scroogenomics If you think it's the thought that counts when giving a gift, then you haven't been talking to enough economists. Host Kai Ryssdal discusses Scroogenomics.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air The Family Author Jeff Sharlet discusses his newest book, "The Family: The Secret Fundamentalism at the Heart of American Power," about a secretive fellowship of conservative Christian politicians.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Margaret Atwood Margaret Atwood's reputation as a poet, novelist, critic, essayist, short story writer and social historian has been established through more than 60 works, and translated into more than 20 languages. The Canadian author's books include Cat's Eye, The Handmaid's Tale, Alias Grace and The Blind Assassin. Themes of feminism, environmentalism and political activism are prominent in Atwoods work. Her new novel, The Year of the Flood, follows a group of characters that call themselves "God's Gardeners," which Atwood introduced in her earlier novel Oryx and Crake. The novel draws on science fiction, dystopian writings, homeopathic medicine and classical epic. To celebrate this wide-ranging project, Orville Stoeber composed music to accompany the hymns of Gods Gardeners, which appear throughout the book. On October 6, 2009, Margaret Atwood visited the Herbst Theatre in San Francisco, to read from "The Year of the Flood" and perform hymns with Orville Stoeber.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
  • 11:04 pm
    California Money KQED Radio News daily business and economics newscast.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Performance Royalties and Black Radio Currently, radio stations don't pay musicians royalties when their recordings are played on-air. Now, Congress has taken up the issue and resistance has come from an unexpected quarter: black radio. African-American broadcasters contend that performance royalties could put them out of business.
Tuesday, November 24, 2009

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