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Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.

Recently on Radio Specials:

Sat, Feb 6, 2016 -- 3:00 PM
Sat, Feb 6, 2016 -- 3:00 PM Mandela: An Audio History

"Mandela: An Audio History" is a groundbreaking project that weaves together an unprecedented collection of archival sound materials documenting and preserving the story of Nelson Mandela and the struggle against apartheid. Hear a rare recording of the 1964 trial that resulted in Mandela's life sentence; a visit between Mandela and his wife, Winnie, secretly recorded by a prison guard; marching songs of guerilla soldiers; government propaganda films; and pirate radio broadcasts from the African National Conference (ANC).

Fri, Feb 5, 2016 -- 2:00 AM
Fri, Feb 5, 2016 -- 2:00 AM Intelligence Squared U.S.

"Do U.S. Prosecutors Have Too Much Power?" -- Autonomy and immunity endow prosecutors with immense power within the criminal justice system. They control who will be charged, the specifics of the charge, and what goes to trial. What's more, defendants and defense attorneys are not permitted to be present during the grand jury process preceding and determining criminal indictments. Critics charge that there is an epidemic of prosecutorial misconduct, encouraged by an opacity and lack of accountability that threatens our legal system and democracy itself. But when the system works well, they are able to effectively prosecute crimes of great complexity. Is it time to rein in prosecutors?

Thu, Feb 4, 2016 -- 8:00 PM
Thu, Feb 4, 2016 -- 8:00 PM Intelligence Squared U.S.

"Do U.S. Prosecutors Have Too Much Power?" -- Autonomy and immunity endow prosecutors with immense power within the criminal justice system. They control who will be charged, the specifics of the charge, and what goes to trial. What's more, defendants and defense attorneys are not permitted to be present during the grand jury process preceding and determining criminal indictments. Critics charge that there is an epidemic of prosecutorial misconduct, encouraged by an opacity and lack of accountability that threatens our legal system and democracy itself. But when the system works well, they are able to effectively prosecute crimes of great complexity. Is it time to rein in prosecutors?

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