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Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.

Coming up on Radio Specials:

Thu, Feb 11, 2016 -- 8:00 PM
Thu, Feb 11, 2016 -- 8:00 PM Hearing Voices

Loves Labors -- Amy Dickinson of Chicago Tribunes Ask Amy talks about affairs of the heart, and the intricacies of intimacy.



Recently on Radio Specials:

Thu, Feb 11, 2016 -- 2:00 AM
Thu, Feb 11, 2016 -- 2:00 AM Climate One: From the Commonwealth Club

Remaking the Planet -- Increasing droughts, floods, and other severe climate-driven events are raising questions about building a planetary panic button. One possible solution is hacking the sky and oceans on a scale unprecedented in human history. Options for geoengineering include a stratospheric veil against the sun, the cultivation of photosynthetic plankton, and fleets of unmanned ships seeding the clouds. That sounds like science fiction, but a small group of scientists and technologists are advocating for funding and testing such far-fetched scenarios in case people cant kick their addiction to fossil fuels in time to stabilize the climate that supports our economy and lifestyles.Oliver Mortons new book, The Planet Remade, explores the promise and peril of tinkering in technologies with profound moral and political implications. Kim Stanley Robinson is a noted science fiction author who is actively engaged on climate issues. A conversation about the technological, moral and governance concerns rising from geoengineering and what it means for our relationship to nature.

Wed, Feb 10, 2016 -- 8:00 PM
Wed, Feb 10, 2016 -- 8:00 PM Climate One -- from the Commonwealth Club

Remaking the Planet -- Increasing droughts, floods, and other severe climate-driven events are raising questions about building a planetary panic button. One possible solution is hacking the sky and oceans on a scale unprecedented in human history. Options for geoengineering include a stratospheric veil against the sun, the cultivation of photosynthetic plankton, and fleets of unmanned ships seeding the clouds. That sounds like science fiction, but a small group of scientists and technologists are advocating for funding and testing such far-fetched scenarios in case people cant kick their addiction to fossil fuels in time to stabilize the climate that supports our economy and lifestyles.Oliver Mortons new book, The Planet Remade, explores the promise and peril of tinkering in technologies with profound moral and political implications. Kim Stanley Robinson is a noted science fiction author who is actively engaged on climate issues. A conversation about the technological, moral and governance concerns rising from geoengineering and what it means for our relationship to nature.

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