Donate

Next Broadcast:

Remembering Oliver Sacks
The show listens back to a program with the late Dr. Oliver Sacks, physician, professor of neurology and psychiatry and author of 10 books, including "The Mind's Eye," "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" and "Awakenings," which inspired the Oscar-nominated film. His recent book "Hallucinations" is a provocative investigation into auditory, visual, tactile and olfactory misperceptions, their physiological sources and their personal and cultural resonances. In addition to drug-inspired varieties, Sacks examines the many different types of non-psychotic hallucination caused by various illnesses or injuries, by intoxication -- even, for many people, by falling asleep. From the elementary geometrical shapes that we see when we rub our eyes to the complex images of a visual migraine, hallucination takes many forms, and Sacks investigates the fundamental differences and similarities between them, what they say about the organization and structure of our brains, how they have influenced every culture's folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all. Oliver Sacks passed away on August 30 at the age of 82. He appeared in conversation with Roy Eisenhardt on November 12, 2012.

Sun, Sep 6, 2015 -- 1:00pm


Remembering Oliver Sacks
The show listens back to a program with the late Dr. Oliver Sacks, physician, professor of neurology and psychiatry and author of 10 books, including "The Mind's Eye," "The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat" and "Awakenings," which inspired the Oscar-nominated film. His recent book "Hallucinations" is a provocative investigation into auditory, visual, tactile and olfactory misperceptions, their physiological sources and their personal and cultural resonances. In addition to drug-inspired varieties, Sacks examines the many different types of non-psychotic hallucination caused by various illnesses or injuries, by intoxication -- even, for many people, by falling asleep. From the elementary geometrical shapes that we see when we rub our eyes to the complex images of a visual migraine, hallucination takes many forms, and Sacks investigates the fundamental differences and similarities between them, what they say about the organization and structure of our brains, how they have influenced every culture's folklore and art, and why the potential for hallucination is present in us all. Oliver Sacks passed away on August 30 at the age of 82. He appeared in conversation with Roy Eisenhardt on November 12, 2012.

Tue, Sep 8, 2015 -- 8:00pm


Hear celebrated writers, artists and thinkers address contemporary ideas and values, often discussing the creative process. Please note: tapes or transcripts are not available.

Wed, Sep 9, 2015 -- 2:00am


Become a KQED sponsor