Donate

KQED Newsletters

Newsletters

Get regular updates on great programs and events

More from KQED

KQED Radio Staff

Tyche Hendricks

Tyche Hendricks
Project Editor, The California Report

Tyche Hendricks is the editor of Governing California, a project of The California Report, where she’s responsible for on air and on-line coverage of state governance.

Hendricks spent more than a dozen years at newspapers, most of them at the San Francisco Chronicle, where she covered immigration, demographics and immigrant communities. She has also reported on local government, transportation, urban planning, cops and courts and schools. She has worked at the Hearst-owned San Francisco Examiner, the San Jose Mercury News and the Seattle Times.

Hendricks reported extensively on the U.S.-Mexico border and her book, "The Wind Doesn't Need a Passport: Stories from the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands," was published by the University of California Press in June 2010. She teaches at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism.

Hendricks started her journalism career in radio, filing stories for Marketplace, Pacifica Network News and The California Report. Her work has won awards from the Society for Professional Journalists, the Best of the West and the National Federation of Community Broadcasters. She was a Knight Digital Media Fellow in 2010.

She holds a BA from Wesleyan University, and an MA in Latin American Studies and an MJ in Journalism, both from UC Berkeley. She speaks fluent Spanish and passable French.

Stories (243 archives)


The California Report | Aug 27, 2014 8:50 AM
Lawmakers Approve Bill to Crack Down on Farmers Market Fraud

Farmers markets have never been more popular in California. But what regulation exists is spotty, and happens mostly at the local level. Those who've looked into it report plenty of fraud going on regarding whether produce marked "organic" actually is. A bill that would strengthen regulators' hands now sits on Gov. Jerry Brown's desk. We discuss the details with one of the state's foremost fruit experts, David Karp.

The California Report | Aug 25, 2014 8:50 AM
Napa Residents Assess Damage, Begin Cleanup After Quake

With no deaths reported, Sunday morning's 6.0 earthquake centered near Napa could have been worse. Still, around 200 people were taken to hospitals, and the destruction of homes and infrastructure led Gov. Jerry Brown to declare a state of emergency.

The California Report | Aug 21, 2014 8:50 AM
California-Trained Doctor Helps Keep Liberian Hospital Open During Ebola Crisis

While many run from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, some brave souls are running toward the region to help. Dr. James Appel is one of those. Trained in the Inland Empire at the Loma Linda University School of Medicine, he's been working for Adventist Health International at hospitals in Chad for the last decade. Last week, Dr. Appel flew to Liberia to keep the doors open at Cooper Adventist, a small hospital in the capitol, Monrovia.

The California Report | Aug 12, 2014 8:50 AM
Are Proposed Assisted Living Reforms Enough?

Over the last 25 years, the number of assisted living facilities in California has almost doubled. The homes are intended to care for relatively independent, healthy seniors -- but that doesn't describe a lot of the people living in them today. In Sacramento, where regulations haven't changed much in close to 30 years, lawmakers held hearings featuring reform advocates like Aaron Byzak, whose grandmother Hazel died in assisted living. "If somebody parked in my grandmother's disabled parking lot illegally, they'd be fined $450," he told reporters in the state Capitol. "But they kill her, and it's $150."

The California Report | Aug 11, 2014 8:50 AM
Lack of Enforcement Follows Crimes at Assisted Living Facilities

When families place a loved one in an assisted living facility, there's an expectation that if something goes wrong, there will be consequences. Mistakes will be addressed. Crimes will be prosecuted. But that's not always the case in practice. Recent reports in the media detailed stories of abuse so dramatic, they inspired a round of legislative reform in Sacramento not seen in 30 years. But the proposed reforms come too late for some, like Stacey Siriani of San Diego County.

Sponsored by