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Bay Area

Ocean Acidification Threatening Many Species

Oceans throughout the world are facing a new threat: acidification. KQED's Scott Shafer explains.

Is Oakland That Unfriendly? You Weigh In

Oakland is the second-least-friendly U.S. city, according to one survey. But we want your opinion.

Rough Fire Update: 72,300 Acres, 25 Percent Contained

Fire burning in rugged country at the edge of Kings Canyon National Park is now the state's biggest in 2015.

How Many Fish in the Sea? Genetic Testing Could Answer That

DNA testing, the same tech used in human health, could change the way biologists study the ocean.

Recently on KQED Public Radio

Forum With Michael Krasny

Mayor Ed Lee's Statement on Relocating Homeless Before Super Bowl Reignites Debate

San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee recently announced that homeless people camping along the city's Embarcadero were "going to have to leave" when the city hosts the Super Bowl in February. The statement has angered homeless advocates, who say the mayor's plan contains no commitment to house and treat those removed. But supporters of the mayor, citing health concerns and mounting public frustration over filthy sidewalks and public spaces, say it's time to for the city to crack down.

California, Bay Area School Districts Scramble to Hire Teachers

Nationwide, school districts can't find enough teachers to fill their classrooms. And the teacher shortage has hit California particularly hard. Between 2008 and 2012, the state lost 82,000 school jobs to budget cuts, according to the Labor Department. Now, with declining enrollment in teacher credential programs and increased state funding for new hires, local districts are struggling to fill open teaching positions. How is the teacher shortage affecting your classroom or school?

Report: Rising Sea Levels Threaten $21 Billion Development Plans

A new special report from the San Francisco Public Press says there are $21 billion worth of planned real estate developments along the Bay's waterfront that could be in jeopardy if sea levels rise. According to the report, waters would "most likely" rise three feet, with some models predicting as high as eight feet, along thousands of acres of shoreline. The Press also warns that policy changes, which might stem the development tide, are inching along and may not be fast enough to affect any projects currently in the pipeline.

UCSF Launches Decades-Long LGBT Health Study With New App

A groundbreaking longitudinal study focusing on LGBT health -- all powered by an iPhone app -- launched last month. UCSF's PRIDE Study, an acronym for "Population Research in Identity and Disparities for Equality," hopes to follow its participants across several decades and track the impact of heart disease, depression and other health issues. We discuss these new strategies to address health issues within the LGBT community with the study's co-directors.

The California Report

President Obama Grants Disaster Relief in Wake of Napa Quake

President Barack Obama has declared last month's South Napa Earthquake a major disaster. The declaration frees up emergency federal dollars for California. The White House didn't say how much, but Gov. Brown's office has identified an estimated $87 million worth of costs that could be reimbursed. Federal funds will go to reimburse state and local governments and non-profits for emergency work, and repairs and replacement of public facilities.

Recycled Wastewater Program Keeps East Bay Gardens Alive

As the drought wears on, Californians are looking for new ways to conserve water. In the hot suburbs east of San Francisco, one water district is giving away treated sewage water for landscaping. It's the first program of its kind in the nation.

Oakland School District to Hire Learning Specialist for Undocumented Minors

Many children who fled Central America due to violence are now attending schools across California. Some districts are taking steps to prepare for the specific needs of these new students. Oakland Unified is one such system. It's perhaps the first district in the state that plans to hire an unaccompanied minor specialist.

Reunited by Crisis: Two Sisters From El Salvador Deal With Trauma

Seventeen-year-old Jennifer Cruz fled El Salvador nine months ago to escape gang violence. Like hundreds of other Central American kids who came to California, Jennifer is trying to make her way through U.S. immigration court. Meanwhile, she's living with her sister, Yesenia, in San Mateo County -- they've been reunited after years apart.