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Gumby Dharma



Watch this entire Truly CA episode: Gumby Dharma by filmmaker Robina Marchesi. (Running Time: 56:42)

This is the story of Art Clokey, who in 1954 took a humble slab of clay and molded it into the cartoon legend Gumby. At once quirky and colorful, heartbreaking and redemptive, Gumby Dharma takes us on a journey through the life and career of a spiritual seeker whose famous characters, Gumby and Pokey, and Davy and Goliath, echoed the spiritual path of their creator. It's a journey that leads us from an orphanage to adored adopted father, from the Seminary to Hollywood, from nuclear family to hippie counterculture, and from the traditional Episcopalian church to Buddhism and Indian guru Sai Baba.

Gumby Dharma features candid and revealing interviews with an 85-year-old Clokey, vivid scenes from Gumby episodes, home movies shot by Art when he was a kid, and interviews with contemporary leaders in animation, including Director Henry Selick (Nightmare Before Christmas, James and the Giant Peach) and special effects legend Ray Harryhausen (Jason and the Argonauts, Adventures of Sinbad). Also included is new stop motion animation of Gumby and Pokey, who narrate this playful and touching homage to the grandfather of clay animation, Art Clokey.

[Original air date: Tue, Mar 27, 2007]

This program is not currently scheduled for broadcast.



Filmmaker Profiles:

Robina Marchesi

Read more about Robina Marchesi, director/producer of Gumby Dharma.

Gumby Dharma: Crew & Credits

Robina Marchesi (Director, Producer) 1965-2005
Gumby Dharma is Robina's first full-length documentary. She worked on a variety of Bay Area independent films, including as First Assistant Director on Trinh Minh Ha's Night Passage. She was the Manager for the 2002 and 2003 Sundance Film Festival's House of Docs, and Festival Coordinator for The Mill Valley Film Festival for the past six years. Robina passed away on May 22, 2005. She will live on in our hearts and through this film.

Klara Grunning-Harris (Producer, Director of Photography)
Klara has worked as an independent producer, director and cinematographer for the last 15 years. In addition to Gumby Dharma, her credits include What Do You Believe?, a feature documentary by Sarah Feinbloom; Nice Chinese Boy, a short by Alison Wong, Looking For Buddha, a narrative feature by Olin Hyde & Peter Nilsson, several commercials, industrials, web-interactives and music videos for bands like Fingertight and Machinehead.

Klara has been invited to judge several media funds, partake in film festival panels and to co-chair a local mentorship program for emerging filmmakers in the San Francisco Bay Area. She currently works as the Coordinating Producer for ITVS International (the Independent Television Service) and consults and mentors emerging filmmakers in the Bay Area.

Timothy Hittle (Director of Animation, Animator, Producer)
Tim Hittle is the creator of Jay Clay and Blue, the lead characters of his films Potato Hunter and Canhead. The third Jay Clay film, which will complete the trilogy, is a work in progress. Canhead was nominated for an Academy Award in 1996, for Best Animated Short. Tim's credits include Tim Burton's Nightmare Before Christmas and James and the Giant Peach; Pixar's A Bug's Life, Toy Story 2, and The Incredibles; and, with Henry Selick, Monkey Bone and The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. Currently Tim is an animator at Pixar Studios.

Liza Maine Seybold (Editor)
Liza Maine Seybold has worked in Bay Area post-production since 1997 and is the Supervising Internal Editor on the Final Cut Pro team at Apple Computer, Inc.

Her film credits include editing the feature Prospect and the documentary feature Tribal Style: Becoming a Belly Dancer. She was an additional editor on the feature Pomegranate and the broadcast documentary Store Wars, When Wal-Mart Comes to Town. Liza has also edited numerous narrative and documentary shorts including Twilight, which won the Golden Gate Award for Best Narrative Short at the 2005 San Francisco International Film Festival and screened at the 2005 Telluride and Toronto Film Festivals.

Liza has 2 feature projects slated for 2007, the documentary Atomic Mom and the Victorian thriller The Girl in the Ground. When Liza's not editing, she enjoys the great outdoors, shoots Super 8 home movies and serves on the Board of Directors of Bay Area Women in Film and Television.

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