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Tue, Jul 22, 2014 -- 9:00 AM

GI Bill Funds Wasted on Substandard Colleges, Investigation Finds


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Scott Olson/Getty Images
Military veterans attend a job fair at the University of Phoenix on June 21, 2012. Nationally, the university has received nearly $1 billion from the new GI Bill over the last five years.
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Military veterans attend a job fair at the University of Phoenix on June 21, 2012. Nationally, the university has received nearly $1 billion from the new GI Bill over the last five years.

In 2008, Congress passed a new GI Bill that, for the first time since World War II, promised to pay the full cost of a college education for veterans. But a report by the Center for Investigative Reporting finds that more than $600 million of that money has been spent on California schools that have graduation rates so low, or loan-default rates so high, that they don't meet state standards for aid. The report contends that the GI Bill is pouring money into for-profit colleges that often leave veterans with worthless degrees and few job prospects.

Host: Michael Krasny

Guests:

  • Aaron Glantz, veterans reporter at The Center for Investigative Reporting and author of "The War Comes Home: Washington's Battle Against America's Veterans"
  • Keith Boylan, deputy secretary of veteran services for the California Department of Veteran Affairs
  • Mark Brenner, chief of staff at the Apollo Education Group, the parent company of University of Phoenix

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