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Tue, Jun 24, 2014 -- 9:00 AM

U.S. Struggles to Cope With Surge of Children From Central America


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John Moore/Getty Images
A child on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border fence looks into Arizona.
John Moore/Getty Images
A child on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border fence looks into Arizona.

Two Congressional hearings this week will consider what to do about the surge of children crossing the United States-Mexico border. According to the Obama administration, 52,000 unaccompanied minors have entered the country since October. Most are seeking refuge from the drug violence in Central American countries. President Obama has declared the surge in arrivals -- up 90 percent from last year -- an "urgent humanitarian situation." Critics blame the crisis on the president, saying his lax deportation policies have encouraged people to come to the U.S. illegally. We discuss the conditions in detention facilities where children are being held, and what should be done about the crisis.

Host: Michael Krasny

Guests:

  • Ira Mehlman, media director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform (FAIR)
  • Marc Rosenblum, deputy director of the U.S. Immigration Policy Program at the Migration Policy Institute
  • Ruthie Epstein, ACLU policy analyst

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