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Thu, May 1, 2014 -- 9:30 AM

Study: One in 25 People Sentenced to Death Are Likely Innocent


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Scott Shafer/KQED
Phones inside the lethal injection chamber at San Quentin State Prison. If the governor were to call and halt an execution, one of these phones would ring.
Scott Shafer/KQED
Phones inside the lethal injection chamber at San Quentin State Prison. If the governor were to call and halt an execution, one of these phones would ring.

A new study published by the National Academy of Sciences attempts to answer a question at the heart of the capital punishment debate: How many innocent people are sentenced to death? Based on a statistical analysis, the study's authors estimate that 4.1 percent of those sentenced to death are innocent. We discuss the study and its implications.

Host: Michael Krasny

Guests:

  • Samuel Gross, professor of law at the University of Michigan, co-founder and editor of the National Registry of Exonerations and co-author of "The Rate of False Convictions Among Criminal Defendants Who are Sentenced to Death"

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