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Wed, Jul 31, 2013 -- 9:00 AM

Mixed Verdict in Bradley Manning Case


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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning is escorted by military police as he leaves after the first day of closing arguments in his military trial July 25, 2013 Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
U.S. Army Private First Class Bradley Manning is escorted by military police as he leaves after the first day of closing arguments in his military trial July 25, 2013 Fort George G. Meade, Maryland.

The trial of U.S. Army Private Bradley Manning came to a close Monday. Accused of leaking an enormous trove of documents to Wikileaks, Manning was found guilty of multiple counts of theft of government property and espionage -- but was acquitted of the most serious charge of aiding the enemy. The sentencing phase of trial starts Wednesday and could last weeks, as Manning faces up to 130 years in prison. We'll look at the legal rationale behind the verdict and debate the severity of his crimes. We'll also look at what the verdict means for leaker Edward Snowden, who is still holed up in a Moscow airport.

Host: Michael Krasny

Guests:

  • Elizabeth Hillman, professor of law, provost and academic dean at UC Hastings College of the Law
  • Norman Solomon, columnist, activist and author of "Made Love, Got War: Close Encounters with America's Warfare State"
  • Steven Bucci, director of the Allison Center for Foreign Policy Studies at the Heritage Foundation

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