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Tue, Aug 16, 2011 -- 9:00 AM

BART, Cell Phones, and Cybersecurity


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Justin Sullivan/Getty
A demonstrator with a mask reading "anonymity is dead" tries to use his cell phone during a protest inside the Civic Center BART station on August 15, 2011.
Justin Sullivan/Getty
A demonstrator with a mask reading "anonymity is dead" tries to use his cell phone during a protest inside the Civic Center BART station on August 15, 2011.

BART's decision to shut down cell service to thwart a protest has critics charging First Amendment violations. The hacker group known as Anonymous retaliated against BART by breaking into the transit agency's website and posting information about customers. Are BART's actions justified in order to protect passengers? Is hacking a reasonable way to protest? Are there parallels to the crackdowns in Egypt and Syria?

Host: Scott Shafer

Guests:

  • Dan Goodrich, research associate at the Norman Y. Mineta Transportation Institute at San Jose State University
  • Eugene Volokh, professor of law at UCLA
  • Joseph Menn, San Francisco-based reporter for the Financial Times and author of the new book "Fatal System Error: The Hunt for the New Crime Lords Who are Bringing Down the Internet"
  • Lynette Sweet, BART director, District 7
  • Michael T. Risher, staff attorney at the ACLU of Northern California

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