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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

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KQED World: Saturday, August 12, 2017

Channels 9.3 •  54.5 | XFINITY 190

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 12, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#12030] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#36160] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#4168] Tavis talks with comedian Paula Poundstone about her book The Totally Unscientific Study of the Search for Human Happiness and author Cheech Marin about his memoir Cheech is Not My Real Name...But Don't Call Me Chong! duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    The Crowd & The Cloud [#102] Citizens + Scientists Citizen scientists track air and water pollution at fracking sites in windswept Wyoming and five other states, using simple but science-based techniques developed by the "Bucket Brigade." On idyllic East Coast trout streams, volunteers from Trout Unlimited monitor water quality regularly, generating baseline data that will prove invaluable in the event of future pollution events. Community members connected with professional researchers to tackle Flint's drinking water crisis and now the same is happening in Philadelphia and other cities. In China, citizens use government data and a unique mobile app to report environmental crimes. When citizens and scientists partner, it's a win-win for all concerned. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Second Opinion [#607] Leukemia (CLL) Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is a type of leukemia that mainly affects people over the age of 50. The use of biologic markers has greatly increased the ability to diagnose, stage, choose treatments and give prognosis of this disease, making it a disease that many people can live with for many years. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1408] Etf Dominance? Guest: Matt Hougan, CEO, Inside ETFs. This week's Consuelo Mack WealthTrack features ETF expert Matt Hougan, who explains why "the gig is up" for mutual funds as passive, exchange-traded funds outperform and attract record amounts of money. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2618] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Washington Week [#5706] Tensions escalated between the United States and North Korea after U. S. intelligence agencies assessed North Korea has successfully miniaturized a nuclear warhead that could fit on a missile capable of reaching Chicago. President Trump warned Kim Jong-un of the "fire and fury" the United States would unleash if his government continues its nuclear posturing and said the U.S. military solutions are "locked and loaded." North Korean military leaders dismissed the warning as a "load of nonsense" and threatened to launch missiles at the American territory of Guam, home of the B-1 bombers the Pentagon would potentially use to attack North Korea's missile sites.
    *Secretary of State Rex Tillerson defended the president's message and said North Korea is not an imminent threat. But Defense Secretary James Mattis released a statement amplifying the president's warning telling Pyongyang to halt its arms program. While the administration insists it is "speaking with one voice," the mixed messages raise the question -- who's advising the president on foreign policy?
    * Robert Costa will discuss the options being considered to de-escalate the nuclear standoff between the United States and North Korea with:
    *Alexis Simendinger of Real Clear Politics
    *Yeganeh Torbati of Reuters
    *Nancy Youssef of BuzzFeed News
    *Michael Duffy of TIME Magazine
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson [#101H] Clean / Time Dirty water has killed more humans than all the wars of history combined, but in the last 150 years, a series of radical ideas, extraordinary innovations and unsung heroes have changed our world. Johnson plunges into a sewer to understand what made a maverick engineer decide to lift the city of Chicago with screw jacks in order to build America's first sewer system. He talks about John Leal, who deliberately "poisoned" the water supply of 200,000 people when, without authorization, he added chlorine, considered lethal in 1908, into Jersey City's water and made it safe to drink. This isn't only about the world becoming a cleaner place - the iPhone, the subway, flat screen TVs and even the bikini are the result of the valiant efforts of the unsung heroes of clean. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson [#102H] Time The world today is obsessed by time. Johnson boards a submarine to discover what a lack of natural light means for a sailor's working day and visits Heathrow, the world's busiest airport, to try to get timings right at air traffic control. The story of getting a grip on time is full of curious garage tinkerers. One of them, railway clerk William F. Allen, was so exasperated by the chaos caused by the 8,000 local times zones in the U.S. that he fought tirelessly to standardize time into four zones. Learn how advancements in navigation, the way we work, technology and travel would have been impossible without the unsung heroes of time. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 7:00 am
    The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements [#101] Out of Thin Air (1754-1806) One of science's great odd couples - British minister Joseph Priestley and French tax administrator Antoine Lavoisier - together discover a fantastic new gas called oxygen, overturning the reigning theory of chemistry and triggering a worldwide search for new elements. Soon caught up in the hunt is science's first great showman, a precocious British chemist named Humphry Davy, who dazzles London audiences with his lectures, introduces them to laughing gas, and turns the battery into a powerful tool in the search for new elements. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1408] Etf Dominance? Guest: Matt Hougan, CEO, Inside ETFs. This week's Consuelo Mack WealthTrack features ETF expert Matt Hougan, who explains why "the gig is up" for mutual funds as passive, exchange-traded funds outperform and attract record amounts of money. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Second Opinion [#607] Leukemia (CLL) Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) is a type of leukemia that mainly affects people over the age of 50. The use of biologic markers has greatly increased the ability to diagnose, stage, choose treatments and give prognosis of this disease, making it a disease that many people can live with for many years. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Bomb See how America developed the most destructive invention in human history - the nuclear bomb - how it changed the world and how it continues to loom large in our lives. Hear from historians and those who experienced the dawn of the atomic age. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG-V
  • 11:00 am
    How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson [#101H] Clean / Time Dirty water has killed more humans than all the wars of history combined, but in the last 150 years, a series of radical ideas, extraordinary innovations and unsung heroes have changed our world. Johnson plunges into a sewer to understand what made a maverick engineer decide to lift the city of Chicago with screw jacks in order to build America's first sewer system. He talks about John Leal, who deliberately "poisoned" the water supply of 200,000 people when, without authorization, he added chlorine, considered lethal in 1908, into Jersey City's water and made it safe to drink. This isn't only about the world becoming a cleaner place - the iPhone, the subway, flat screen TVs and even the bikini are the result of the valiant efforts of the unsung heroes of clean. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    How We Got to Now with Steven Johnson [#102H] Time The world today is obsessed by time. Johnson boards a submarine to discover what a lack of natural light means for a sailor's working day and visits Heathrow, the world's busiest airport, to try to get timings right at air traffic control. The story of getting a grip on time is full of curious garage tinkerers. One of them, railway clerk William F. Allen, was so exasperated by the chaos caused by the 8,000 local times zones in the U.S. that he fought tirelessly to standardize time into four zones. Learn how advancements in navigation, the way we work, technology and travel would have been impossible without the unsung heroes of time. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 1:00 pm
    The Mystery of Matter: Search for the Elements [#101] Out of Thin Air (1754-1806) One of science's great odd couples - British minister Joseph Priestley and French tax administrator Antoine Lavoisier - together discover a fantastic new gas called oxygen, overturning the reigning theory of chemistry and triggering a worldwide search for new elements. Soon caught up in the hunt is science's first great showman, a precocious British chemist named Humphry Davy, who dazzles London audiences with his lectures, introduces them to laughing gas, and turns the battery into a powerful tool in the search for new elements. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2618] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:30 pm
    Washington Week [#5706] Tensions escalated between the United States and North Korea after U. S. intelligence agencies assessed North Korea has successfully miniaturized a nuclear warhead that could fit on a missile capable of reaching Chicago. President Trump warned Kim Jong-un of the "fire and fury" the United States would unleash if his government continues its nuclear posturing and said the U.S. military solutions are "locked and loaded." North Korean military leaders dismissed the warning as a "load of nonsense" and threatened to launch missiles at the American territory of Guam, home of the B-1 bombers the Pentagon would potentially use to attack North Korea's missile sites.
    *Secretary of State Rex Tillerson defended the president's message and said North Korea is not an imminent threat. But Defense Secretary James Mattis released a statement amplifying the president's warning telling Pyongyang to halt its arms program. While the administration insists it is "speaking with one voice," the mixed messages raise the question -- who's advising the president on foreign policy?
    * Robert Costa will discuss the options being considered to de-escalate the nuclear standoff between the United States and North Korea with:
    *Alexis Simendinger of Real Clear Politics
    *Yeganeh Torbati of Reuters
    *Nancy Youssef of BuzzFeed News
    *Michael Duffy of TIME Magazine
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    American Forum [#236] The Perils of Presidential Ambition Historian John Farrell on his new evidence that President Richard Nixon sabotaged Vietnam peace talks in 1968. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#505] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Focus On Europe [#3532] Chinese Invasion In Greece More and more retirees in Germany are living below the poverty line. Unused housing in Spain has begun attracting squatters. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 pm
    Global 3000 [#932] Bicycle-Mounted Medical Team Accompany a bicycle-mounted medical team through civil war plagued South Sudan. Join giant manta rays and conservationists off the Peruvian coast, and explore the growing halal tourism market. duration 26:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Earth A New Wild [#103] Forests Journey deep into the great forests of Earth for a new way of looking at these wild places and the animals that live there. Sanjayan travels into an uncharted area of the Amazon that scientists believe is the most bio-diverse place on Earth. From there he follows unique animal behavior in Alaska's Great Bear Rainforest and then meets the farmers in Portugal's cork forests. Frightening elephant battles are exploding on the edge of the forest in Sumatra; in the Amazon, ancient remains are helping change our perception of how to value the world's great forests. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Earth A New Wild [#104] Oceans Starting on the most pristine reef on Earth, home to more predators than prey, Sanjayan draws on his own ocean experiences to reveal a vibrant community of scientists, engineers and fishermen who are providing solutions that can help restore the oceans in astonishing ways. He is aware of the vast scale of the threat to our oceans, but standing in the water playing midwife to a large lemon shark is just one of the moments that give him hope that we can turn around our influence on the most important habitat on Earth. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 pm
    America Reframed [#324] By The River of Babylon: An Elegy for South Louisiana This program looks at the disappearing culture and environment in Southwest Louisiana: its marshlands and man's calamitous engineering mistakes, and the unique habitat that gave rise to the Cajun and Creole, music, culture and people left in its wake. With compelling footage and expert commentary from Bob Marshall, a local Pulitzer prize-winning journalist, among others, the film documents the facades and interiors of a good number of famed but decaying dance halls.
    Riveting performances by leading Zydeco proponents such as Clifton Chenier and Beau Jocque are juxtaposed by thorough and thoughtful explanations such as the rapacious dredging of the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet through wetlands to give oil tankers direct access to the Gulf of Mexico. Louisiana, a major source of energy for the nation, is being destroyed bit by bit and the region's eco-system and marshland continues to be damaged by flooding due to both storms and river reconstruction. Like the famed music of the region, the documentary is both a love letter and a lament over the destruction of the region and by association, the decline of its culture and way of life.
    duration 58:31   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    My Louisiana Love This program journeys with filmmaker Monique Verdin on a quest to connect with her ancestral roots within the Houma Nation, a Native American community reeling from decades of environmental degradation and natural disasters.
    The Houma, one of the largest Native American tribes in North America, live in South Louisiana communities where decaying marshlands serve as the only buffer against storm-surge floodwaters. Verdin sees her people's traditional way of life - and the land they live on - threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. After witnessing the devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, and the BP oil spill in 2010, Verdin finds herself turning to environmental activism, and documenting her family's struggle to stay close to the land despite the cycle of disasters and the rapidly disappearing coastline.
    This film looks at the complex and uneven relationship between the oil and gas industry and the indigenous people of the Mississippi Delta. In this intimate portrait, Verdin must overcome the loss of her house, her father and her partner - and redefine the meaning of "home."
    duration 1:00:00   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 pm
    Earth A New Wild [#103] Forests Journey deep into the great forests of Earth for a new way of looking at these wild places and the animals that live there. Sanjayan travels into an uncharted area of the Amazon that scientists believe is the most bio-diverse place on Earth. From there he follows unique animal behavior in Alaska's Great Bear Rainforest and then meets the farmers in Portugal's cork forests. Frightening elephant battles are exploding on the edge of the forest in Sumatra; in the Amazon, ancient remains are helping change our perception of how to value the world's great forests. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Earth A New Wild [#104] Oceans Starting on the most pristine reef on Earth, home to more predators than prey, Sanjayan draws on his own ocean experiences to reveal a vibrant community of scientists, engineers and fishermen who are providing solutions that can help restore the oceans in astonishing ways. He is aware of the vast scale of the threat to our oceans, but standing in the water playing midwife to a large lemon shark is just one of the moments that give him hope that we can turn around our influence on the most important habitat on Earth. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-L (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    America Reframed [#324] By The River of Babylon: An Elegy for South Louisiana This program looks at the disappearing culture and environment in Southwest Louisiana: its marshlands and man's calamitous engineering mistakes, and the unique habitat that gave rise to the Cajun and Creole, music, culture and people left in its wake. With compelling footage and expert commentary from Bob Marshall, a local Pulitzer prize-winning journalist, among others, the film documents the facades and interiors of a good number of famed but decaying dance halls.
    Riveting performances by leading Zydeco proponents such as Clifton Chenier and Beau Jocque are juxtaposed by thorough and thoughtful explanations such as the rapacious dredging of the Mississippi River Gulf Outlet through wetlands to give oil tankers direct access to the Gulf of Mexico. Louisiana, a major source of energy for the nation, is being destroyed bit by bit and the region's eco-system and marshland continues to be damaged by flooding due to both storms and river reconstruction. Like the famed music of the region, the documentary is both a love letter and a lament over the destruction of the region and by association, the decline of its culture and way of life.
    duration 58:31   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    My Louisiana Love This program journeys with filmmaker Monique Verdin on a quest to connect with her ancestral roots within the Houma Nation, a Native American community reeling from decades of environmental degradation and natural disasters.
    The Houma, one of the largest Native American tribes in North America, live in South Louisiana communities where decaying marshlands serve as the only buffer against storm-surge floodwaters. Verdin sees her people's traditional way of life - and the land they live on - threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. After witnessing the devastation caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005, and the BP oil spill in 2010, Verdin finds herself turning to environmental activism, and documenting her family's struggle to stay close to the land despite the cycle of disasters and the rapidly disappearing coastline.
    This film looks at the complex and uneven relationship between the oil and gas industry and the indigenous people of the Mississippi Delta. In this intimate portrait, Verdin must overcome the loss of her house, her father and her partner - and redefine the meaning of "home."
    duration 1:00:00   STEREO TVG
Saturday, August 12, 2017

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TV Technical Issues

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    • Audio Issue KQED DT 9.1 /25.1

      UPDATE: Audio has been restored, please report any issues!  If you’re still experiencing audio issues, you may need to rescan your television. Visit kqed.org/54move to learn how. Thank you for your patience while we resolve the issue!

    • KQED will no longer broadcast the KQEH signal from Monument Peak Tower effective 1/5/2018

      KQED will be removing its over-the-air television signal from the Monument Peak Tower in the San Jose area on January 5, 2018 (Note: this maintenance was previously scheduled for December 15, 2017). KQED will now broadcast our full suite of channels (KQED 9, KQED Plus, KQED World and PBS Kids) on Channel 9 and 54 […]

    • KQED LIFE OFF AIR Friday, December 15

      KQED will no longer offer the KQED Life channel beginning Friday, December 15. Several of the most popular exercise, cooking and lifestyle programs exclusive to KQED Life will now be scheduled on KQED Plus and KQED 9, where they can be experienced by more viewers. View/Download Schedule

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code.
Outstanding PBS programming, KQED original productions, and more.

All HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus / KQEH

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH
KQED Plus, formerly KTEH.
Unique programs including the best British dramas, mysteries, and comedies.

PBS Kids

PBS Kids

Channel 54.4, 25.4, and 9.4
XFINITY 192 (Monterey/Salinas 372 and Sacramento/Fairfield 391)
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Quality children's programming. Live streaming 24/7 at pbskids.org.

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3, 54.3 and 25.3
XFINITY 190 Monterey/Salinas 371 and Sacramento/Fairfield 390)
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Thought-provoking television — public affairs, local and world events, nature, history, and science.