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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

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KQED World: Sunday, June 8, 2014

Channels 9.3 •  54.5 | XFINITY 190

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, June 8, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#106] Trust This film begins when Marlin, an 18-year-old Hondurena, shares a hidden history about her childhood with a neighborhood youth theater company. Marlin's story is about resilience: she endured rape as young girl, survived a harsh and difficult journey from Honduras to the US, suffered further abuse at the hands of her own brother, and overcame substance addiction. The film captures the amazing response from her fellow actors and the unexpected journey her story takes them on together: they transform Marlin's story into a daring, original play and Marlin re-claims power over the narrative of her life story. "Trust" is about creativity and the unexpected resources inside youth who may be discounted because of their youth, race or ethnicity or because they come from under-resourced neighborhoods without access to arts programs. duration 1:24:54   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Australian Story: on the Precipice Scott Johnson was a young man with everything going for him - a maths genius with a bright future. But on a trip to a Sydney beach one sunny day in 1988, everything changed. The search for the truth of what happened that day has brought together a wealthy internet pioneer, an international super sleuth, and the NSW Police Cold Case Unit. The story of their quest to solve a twenty-five-year-old-mystery. duration 29:30   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#301] Inside Common Core Classrooms We'll begin the new season of Teaching Channel Presents in classrooms where teachers are already integrating the Common Core. From adding and subtracting to fractions and functions, we'll follow students as they explore mathematical reasoning across grade levels. See how the standards change as students advance. And, we'll visit three lively English classes where the Common Core emphasis is on speaking and listening skills. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#322H] Stiglitz On Tax Reform to Save The Middle Class This week, Nobel Laureate economist Joseph E. Stiglitz says the economic situation in America is grave. Inequality is too great, unemployment too high, public investments too meager, corporations too greedy, and the tax code too biased toward the very rich.
    "We already have a system that isn't working," he tells Bill Moyers. "We already have a tax system that has contributed to making America the most unequal society of the advanced countries. We can have a tax system that can help create a fairer society. Only ask the people at the top to pay their fair share. It's not asking a lot. It's just saying the top 1% shouldn't be paying a lower tax rate than somebody much further down the scale - [they] shouldn't have the opportunity to move money offshore."
    Stiglitz believes that taxes can be used as incentives: "If your taxes say we want to encourage real investments in America, then you get real investment in America. But I also believe that you have to shape incentives and that markets on their own don't necessarily shape them the right way."
    The economist concludes that the barriers to solving our problems are political, not economic, and we can change what's wrong if enough of us insist.
    Now a professor at Columbia University, Joseph E. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Clinton White House, as chief economist of the World Bank and is currently president of the International Economic Association. He is a best-selling author with a worldwide following that includes presidents and prime ministers. Last week, he published a new call to action, a 27-page report for the Roosevelt Institute on how to reform our tax system and rebuild our country.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#408] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week [#5349%] * President Obama is standing firm on his decision to negotiate with the Taliban to secure the release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. During a news conference in Brussels, Belgium on Thursday, President Obama said, "I make absolutely no apologies for making sure we get back a young man to his parents." Republican, and even some Democratic, lawmakers have accused the president of working around Congress in making the deal to trade Bergdahl for 5 Taliban prisoners who were being held at Guantanamo Bay. David Sanger of The New York Times and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post examine the circumstances surrounding Bowe Bergdahl's capture and release and how the prisoner swap has ignited a political firestorm on Capitol Hill.
    * The GOP's intra-party struggle between the Republican establishment and tea party conservatives played out in Mississippi this week where 6-term incumbent Senator Thad Cochran now faces a runoff election with tea party challenger Chris McDaniel. While McDaniel finished with a razor-thin lead, neither candidate reached the 50% threshold to win the nomination. The race had already attracted national attention after some McDaniel supporters were accused of photographing Cochran's wife who has late-stage dementia at the nursing home where she has lived for the past 14 years. McDaniel insists his campaign was not involved in the scheme. Molly Ball of The Atlantic - who traveled to Mississippi this week - takes a closer look at the politics at play in the Magnolia State as well as another high-profile Senate race in Iowa where the GOP primary winner used some clever advertising and a late surge to win her race.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3224H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#147] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3223] The Russian Loyalists In Latvia ALBANIA: THE NEW WOMEN'S MOVEMENT - Time seems to have stood still in the mountain villages of northern Albania. Alongside the state law, the Kanun, a set of laws and norms dating back to the Middle Ages, is still in force here. The back-breaking work in the fields is considered women's work in Albania. That was also true under Communism. In the Catholic stronghold of the north, the Kanun also survived the dictatorship of Enver Hoxha. Under the Kanun, the wife is considered the husband's property. He is permitted to beat and even to kill her if she is disobedient or unfaithful. Fabiola Egro is trying to change that. She's a pivotal figure in the Albanian women's movement.
    TURKEY: A MAYOR FROM GERMANY - In southeastern Turkey, women in politics are not yet commonplace. The majority-Kurdish society is traditionally dominated by men. Despite that, 27-year-old Leyla Imret was elected as mayor of Cizre, a city with about 11,000 residents. And she's not just unusual because she's a woman - Leyla Imret comes from Bremen, Germany. A few years ago, she decided to visit eastern Turkey, where her Kurdish parents were born. In a spontaneous decision, she decided to stay in Cizre.
    LATVIA: THE RUSSIAN LOYALISTS - In the wake of the Crimea crisis, many people in the Baltic countries are concerned. They're wondering how their own citizens of Russian descent would respond in the event of an attack on their country. That's also true in Latvia, where nearly every third citizen has Russian ancestry. Igor and Valerie are from Latgale. It's the easternmost region of Latvia and home to many people of Russian descent. Both Igor and Valerie say they are loyal to Latvia. But some in Latvia do approve of President Vladimir Putin's policies and actions in neighboring Russia. Igor and Valerie are not among them. They're voluntary members of the defense force and take part in military exercises. If need be, they'd defend Latvia against Russian soldiers.
    NETHERLANDS: THE CATCH OF THE DAY IS PLASTIC - Every year, almost 5 million tons of plastic waste winds up in the ocean. Now Fishing for Litter, an initiative started by fishermen, has declared war on marine pollution. Only a small portion of the plastic waste in the sea can be seen floating on the surface; most of the garbage lies on the seafloor. Many marine animals suffer painful deaths as a result. At the other end of the food chain, little is known about the effects the waste could have on humans. Now fishermen from the Netherlands have begun collecting the garbage that gets caught in their nets. The initiative is growing, with hundreds of fishermen now collecting tons of plastic each year. Still, at the current rate, it's estimated that it would take 79,000 more years to rid the oceans of plastic waste.
    POLAND: THE ROUND TABLE REVISITED - The Round Table Talks in 1989 marked the beginning of Poland's road toward democracy. The original table is displayed at the presidential palace in Warsaw. The 1989 negotiations at this table have gone down in history. The talks led to the overturning of the ban on the Solidarnosc trade union and to a partially-free parliamentary election. 25 years ago, on June 4 and June 18, Poland held its first elections since the Second World War. The elections spelled the end to Communist rule in Poland.
    duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#106] Trust This film begins when Marlin, an 18-year-old Hondurena, shares a hidden history about her childhood with a neighborhood youth theater company. Marlin's story is about resilience: she endured rape as young girl, survived a harsh and difficult journey from Honduras to the US, suffered further abuse at the hands of her own brother, and overcame substance addiction. The film captures the amazing response from her fellow actors and the unexpected journey her story takes them on together: they transform Marlin's story into a daring, original play and Marlin re-claims power over the narrative of her life story. "Trust" is about creativity and the unexpected resources inside youth who may be discounted because of their youth, race or ethnicity or because they come from under-resourced neighborhoods without access to arts programs. duration 1:24:54   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Hawaii: Roots of Fire This documentary goes down below the Hawaiian Islands in a search for the hidden forces that drive the planet's largest and most active volcanic system. It follows earth scientists as they work among the volcanoes of the Big Island of Hawaii, pursuing clues and compiling evidence in a quest to shed new light on the mysterious inner Earth process that has been producing giant volcanoes in the middle of the Pacific Ocean for more than 75 million years.
    Scientists have long been puzzled over the source of the huge quantities of lava erupting out of Hawaii's massive volcanoes. Does the lava come from just below the Earth's crust? Or does it come from much deeper, perhaps even as far down as the Earth's core, some 1800 miles below the surface? The film focuses on an international team of scientists who boldly take on these key questions with a major drilling project into the flanks of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest volcano. As their work progresses, another group of scientists embarks on a huge seismic study that deploys instruments on the islands and the seafloor surrounding them. After years of painstaking research, startling new discoveries are made. Not only do the scientists determine where the lava is coming from, but they solve other long-standing mysteries about the workings of Hawaii's magnificent volcanoes.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Biz Forecast [#508] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1050] Mutual Fund Shakeups This week's WT looks at major changes in the mutual fund industry. Investors are deserting actively managed funds for passive ones and fleeing bond funds for other sources of income. In their first joint television appearance, two Morningstar veterans, Christine Benz and Russel Kinnel, tell us what it all means for investors and their funds.
    Guests: Christine Benz, Director of Personal Finance, Senior Columnist, Morningstar, Inc.; Russel Kinnel, Director of Mutual Fund Research, Editor of "Morningstar FundInvestor," Morningstar, Inc.
    duration 27:26   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#314H] Financial advisor Ric Edelman schools a college student in the importance of knowing what you can expect to do with your diploma. And we also get an education about whether there's big bucks in tiny technology. Plus Jean Edelman talks about "Catching the Wave" in The Other Side of Money. All that and more in this edition of The Truth about Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    Between The Lines with Barry Kibrick [#1415] Dr. Pauline Chen - Final Exam In 1999 Dr. Pauline Chen was named UCLA's physician of the year, but found herself wrestling with medicine's most profound paradox, a profession based on caring for the ill systematically depersonalizes dying. With her book, Final Exam, Dr. Chen confronts the fears she and other doctors have about death and takes readers on a compassionate journey that illuminates how we should live. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3224H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week [#5349%] * President Obama is standing firm on his decision to negotiate with the Taliban to secure the release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl. During a news conference in Brussels, Belgium on Thursday, President Obama said, "I make absolutely no apologies for making sure we get back a young man to his parents." Republican, and even some Democratic, lawmakers have accused the president of working around Congress in making the deal to trade Bergdahl for 5 Taliban prisoners who were being held at Guantanamo Bay. David Sanger of The New York Times and Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post examine the circumstances surrounding Bowe Bergdahl's capture and release and how the prisoner swap has ignited a political firestorm on Capitol Hill.
    * The GOP's intra-party struggle between the Republican establishment and tea party conservatives played out in Mississippi this week where 6-term incumbent Senator Thad Cochran now faces a runoff election with tea party challenger Chris McDaniel. While McDaniel finished with a razor-thin lead, neither candidate reached the 50% threshold to win the nomination. The race had already attracted national attention after some McDaniel supporters were accused of photographing Cochran's wife who has late-stage dementia at the nursing home where she has lived for the past 14 years. McDaniel insists his campaign was not involved in the scheme. Molly Ball of The Atlantic - who traveled to Mississippi this week - takes a closer look at the politics at play in the Magnolia State as well as another high-profile Senate race in Iowa where the GOP primary winner used some clever advertising and a late surge to win her race.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#130H] City College of San Francisco's Uncertain Future and the Anderson Art Collection to Open at Stanford
    City College of San Francisco's Uncertain Future
    The fate of City College of San Francisco and its 77,000 students continues to hang in the balance. Faculty and students descended on Sacramento Friday to protest at a meeting of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. That's the body that will strip CCSF of its accreditation on July 31 if it does not extend the deadline. The ACCJC maintains that federal law prohibits it from granting an extension. Several politicians, including Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, have spoken out to defend CCSF and urge the commission to give California's largest community college more time to fully comply with accreditation standards. The commissioners say that City College fell far short of meeting 100 percent compliance when an evaluation team last checked, in spring 2013.

    Guests:
    • Timothy Killikelly, California Federation of Teachers, and CCSF professor of political science
    • Nanette Asimov, San Francisco Chronicle education reporter
    • Rafael Mandelman, CCSF Board of Trustees member
    • Larry Kamer, CCSF Chancellor's Office spokesperson

    Anderson Art Collection to Open at Stanford
    A new Bay Area art museum will open its doors this fall at Stanford University. The Anderson Collection at Stanford will showcase some of the 20th century's most prominent and provocative American post-war greats, like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, along with modern California masters like Wayne Thiebaud and Richard Diebenkorn. The works are a gift from Bay Area collectors Harry and Mary Anderson — known to most people as "Hunk" and "Moo." Thuy Vu visited the Andersons in their Bay Area home to see what it's like to live in house full of masterpieces — and why they are sharing the core of their acclaimed collection with the public.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#322H] Stiglitz On Tax Reform to Save The Middle Class This week, Nobel Laureate economist Joseph E. Stiglitz says the economic situation in America is grave. Inequality is too great, unemployment too high, public investments too meager, corporations too greedy, and the tax code too biased toward the very rich.
    "We already have a system that isn't working," he tells Bill Moyers. "We already have a tax system that has contributed to making America the most unequal society of the advanced countries. We can have a tax system that can help create a fairer society. Only ask the people at the top to pay their fair share. It's not asking a lot. It's just saying the top 1% shouldn't be paying a lower tax rate than somebody much further down the scale - [they] shouldn't have the opportunity to move money offshore."
    Stiglitz believes that taxes can be used as incentives: "If your taxes say we want to encourage real investments in America, then you get real investment in America. But I also believe that you have to shape incentives and that markets on their own don't necessarily shape them the right way."
    The economist concludes that the barriers to solving our problems are political, not economic, and we can change what's wrong if enough of us insist.
    Now a professor at Columbia University, Joseph E. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Clinton White House, as chief economist of the World Bank and is currently president of the International Economic Association. He is a best-selling author with a worldwide following that includes presidents and prime ministers. Last week, he published a new call to action, a 27-page report for the Roosevelt Institute on how to reform our tax system and rebuild our country.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1740] BLOODLESS SURGERY - For Jehovah's Witnesses receiving blood transfusions is a sin. Betty Rollin reports on a bloodless surgery program at Englewood Hospital in New Jersey which serves not only Jehovah's Witnesses but nearly all of their patients. Neurosurgeon Dr. Abe Steinberger says "The risks of giving blood in many cases outweigh the benefits of giving blood." (Originally aired July 12, 2013)
    THE PAINFUL PILGRIMAGE OF CHRISTIAN WIMAN - Poet, seeker and victim, Christian Wiman talks with Judy Valente about his spiritual journey and the central importance of poetry, new metaphors and all the arts to experiencing, for him, the "glimmers of God." The former editor of Poetry magazine taught this year at the Yale Divinity School and Yale's Institute of Sacred Music. Married, with two young daughters, Wiman describes his "glimpses" of the holy at the same time that he lives with an incurable cancer. (Originally aired October 25, 2013)
    SHAVUOT - This past week, Jews observed Shavuot. Also known as the Feast of Weeks, it comes seven weeks after Passover and, along with Passover and Sukkot, is one of three Jewish pilgrimage festivals. It acknowledges the harvest by the Jews as an agricultural people thousands of years ago, and celebrates God's giving of the Torah to the Israelites on Mt. Sinai. (Originally aired June 17, 2011)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    Hawaii: Roots of Fire This documentary goes down below the Hawaiian Islands in a search for the hidden forces that drive the planet's largest and most active volcanic system. It follows earth scientists as they work among the volcanoes of the Big Island of Hawaii, pursuing clues and compiling evidence in a quest to shed new light on the mysterious inner Earth process that has been producing giant volcanoes in the middle of the Pacific Ocean for more than 75 million years.
    Scientists have long been puzzled over the source of the huge quantities of lava erupting out of Hawaii's massive volcanoes. Does the lava come from just below the Earth's crust? Or does it come from much deeper, perhaps even as far down as the Earth's core, some 1800 miles below the surface? The film focuses on an international team of scientists who boldly take on these key questions with a major drilling project into the flanks of Mauna Kea, Hawaii's tallest volcano. As their work progresses, another group of scientists embarks on a huge seismic study that deploys instruments on the islands and the seafloor surrounding them. After years of painstaking research, startling new discoveries are made. Not only do the scientists determine where the lava is coming from, but they solve other long-standing mysteries about the workings of Hawaii's magnificent volcanoes.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2111] Gary Gallagher: Why Remember the Civil War/150th Anniversary Series One of the leading historians of the Civil war, Gary W. Gallagher, on why the Civil War still holds such a grip on the American imagination 150 years later and what we most need to remember from that conflict. Gallagher's books include Becoming Confederates: Paths to a New National Loyalty; The Union War; Causes Won, Lost, and Forgotten: How Hollywood and Popular Art Shape What We Know about the Civil War; and Lee and His Army in Confederate History. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1309] Around The World: Across America: Route 66 & Beyond Justine Shapiro kicks off the journey with a road trip west across the United States. Starting in Washington, DC she follows the Blue Ridge Parkway to Nashville and Memphis, birthplaces of American country and soul. After a brief countryside respite in Arkansas, Justine hits the legendary Route 66 from Oklahoma to Arizona, where she visits the world's best-preserved meteor crater. duration 56:05   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#2810] Outback Pelicans The Australian outback is the driest place on the driest inhabited continent on the planet. It is a place you might expect to see kangaroos but certainly not waterbirds. Yet once every 10 years, rains flood into dried-up river beds and head inland to create the largest lake in Australia, and 100,000 pelicans -- a third of all the pelicans in Australia -- arrive for the event. Leaving their homes on coasts and harbors, they come to feed on fish washed in on the floods and on billions of brine shrimp and other crustaceans which hatch and grow to adulthood in a few days in water twice as salty as the Dead Sea. The pelicans have come home to court and raise as many families as possible before the water and the food disappear once more. duration 54:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#3810H] Japan's Killer Quake In its worst crisis since World War II, Japan faces disaster on an epic scale: a rising death toll in the tens of thousands, massive destruction of homes and businesses, shortages of water and power, and the specter of nuclear reactor meltdowns. The facts and figures are astonishing. The March 11th earthquake was the world's fourth largest earthquake since record keeping began in 1900 and the worst ever to shake Japan. The seismic shock wave released over 4,000 times the energy of the largest nuclear test ever conducted; it shifted the earth's axis by 6 inches and shortened the day by a few millionths of a second. The tsunami slammed Japan's coast with 30 feet-high waves that traveled 6 miles inland, obliterating entire towns in a matter of minutes. This program combines authoritative on-the-spot reporting, personal stories of tragedy and survival, compelling eyewitness videos, explanatory graphics and exclusive helicopter footage for a unique look at the science behind the catastrophe. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Thousand Invisible Cords: Connecting Genes to Ecosystems Can an entire landscape be changed by changing one gene in one plant or animal? Thirty years of interdisciplinary research says yes, and this film follows the scientific journey that came to that conclusion. "A Thousand Invisible Cords: Connecting Genes to Ecosystems" is an eco-documentary that can truly change how we view the world. No longer will we see species as isolated members of ecosystems but as genetically connected members of a rich interacting community. In the words of the 19th century naturalist, writer, and environmental activist John Muir: "When we try to pick out anything by itself, we find that it is bound fast by a thousand invisible cords that cannot be broken to everything in the universe." At the heart of the research is the beautiful and magestic cottonwood tree, which grows along the banks of North American waterways. The lush cottonwoods are central to the health and biodiversity of their ecosystem. Researchers have found that a small change in just a few lines of genetic code in this "foundation species" can have profound effects on whole communities and even entire ecosystems. These findings have inspired scientific collaboration as never before. Researchers as well as the plants and animals they study are artfully shown in the lab and in the field. Beautiful photographey and colorful motion graphics give depth to the viewers' understanding of the ground breaking new scienc, Molecular geneticists, ecologists, and restoration biologists are shown working together toward solving important environmental problems facing our world, such as: ? How to manage climate change ? How to restore damaged ecosystems ? How to preserve biodiversity and ? How to gauge the effects of new technologies on the environment. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#180H] Join us this weekend for two new episodes of PBS NEWSHOUR WEEKEND, featuring a summary of the day's national and international news. Each weekend broadcast will contain original, in-depth field reporting on topics including education, healthcare, the economy, energy, science and technology, religion, finance and the arts. Hari Sreenivasan anchors. duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#130H] City College of San Francisco's Uncertain Future and the Anderson Art Collection to Open at Stanford
    City College of San Francisco's Uncertain Future
    The fate of City College of San Francisco and its 77,000 students continues to hang in the balance. Faculty and students descended on Sacramento Friday to protest at a meeting of the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges. That's the body that will strip CCSF of its accreditation on July 31 if it does not extend the deadline. The ACCJC maintains that federal law prohibits it from granting an extension. Several politicians, including Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, have spoken out to defend CCSF and urge the commission to give California's largest community college more time to fully comply with accreditation standards. The commissioners say that City College fell far short of meeting 100 percent compliance when an evaluation team last checked, in spring 2013.

    Guests:
    • Timothy Killikelly, California Federation of Teachers, and CCSF professor of political science
    • Nanette Asimov, San Francisco Chronicle education reporter
    • Rafael Mandelman, CCSF Board of Trustees member
    • Larry Kamer, CCSF Chancellor's Office spokesperson

    Anderson Art Collection to Open at Stanford
    A new Bay Area art museum will open its doors this fall at Stanford University. The Anderson Collection at Stanford will showcase some of the 20th century's most prominent and provocative American post-war greats, like Jackson Pollock and Mark Rothko, along with modern California masters like Wayne Thiebaud and Richard Diebenkorn. The works are a gift from Bay Area collectors Harry and Mary Anderson — known to most people as "Hunk" and "Moo." Thuy Vu visited the Andersons in their Bay Area home to see what it's like to live in house full of masterpieces — and why they are sharing the core of their acclaimed collection with the public.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#322H] Stiglitz On Tax Reform to Save The Middle Class This week, Nobel Laureate economist Joseph E. Stiglitz says the economic situation in America is grave. Inequality is too great, unemployment too high, public investments too meager, corporations too greedy, and the tax code too biased toward the very rich.
    "We already have a system that isn't working," he tells Bill Moyers. "We already have a tax system that has contributed to making America the most unequal society of the advanced countries. We can have a tax system that can help create a fairer society. Only ask the people at the top to pay their fair share. It's not asking a lot. It's just saying the top 1% shouldn't be paying a lower tax rate than somebody much further down the scale - [they] shouldn't have the opportunity to move money offshore."
    Stiglitz believes that taxes can be used as incentives: "If your taxes say we want to encourage real investments in America, then you get real investment in America. But I also believe that you have to shape incentives and that markets on their own don't necessarily shape them the right way."
    The economist concludes that the barriers to solving our problems are political, not economic, and we can change what's wrong if enough of us insist.
    Now a professor at Columbia University, Joseph E. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Clinton White House, as chief economist of the World Bank and is currently president of the International Economic Association. He is a best-selling author with a worldwide following that includes presidents and prime ministers. Last week, he published a new call to action, a 27-page report for the Roosevelt Institute on how to reform our tax system and rebuild our country.
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:30 pm
    Local USA [#109] Social Media We get social, with social media! Finding the people using social media to change the world. The Chicago painting duo, who use Twitter to reward treasure hunters; documentary cameras hit the streets of Raleigh-Durham, NC, to ask how social media influenced the 2012 presidential election; a look at what happens when an entire generation of Instagram users get together with their cameras on the beaches of Santa Monica, California; and how Facebook helped to make a young Los Angeleno boy's dream come true. duration 27:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Simple Piece of Paper What happens when a state allows adopted citizens to have their original birth certificates? In 2011, Illinois became the largest state in the Union to reverse sealed records laws, providing adult adoptees access to the document recording their birth. 'A Simple Piece of Paper' tells the story of over a dozen adoptees, as they open their records. Their collective experiences provoke a new question: what would have happened if the records had been opened sooner? duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2810] Outback Pelicans The Australian outback is the driest place on the driest inhabited continent on the planet. It is a place you might expect to see kangaroos but certainly not waterbirds. Yet once every 10 years, rains flood into dried-up river beds and head inland to create the largest lake in Australia, and 100,000 pelicans -- a third of all the pelicans in Australia -- arrive for the event. Leaving their homes on coasts and harbors, they come to feed on fish washed in on the floods and on billions of brine shrimp and other crustaceans which hatch and grow to adulthood in a few days in water twice as salty as the Dead Sea. The pelicans have come home to court and raise as many families as possible before the water and the food disappear once more. duration 54:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    AfroPop: The Ultimate Cultural Exchange [#606] The Deported The film follows a group of men, raised in the United States or Canada, and repatriated to Haiti for crimes ranging from violent assaults to driving violations and petty theft. Faced with a language and culture they do not understand, the men struggle to adapt to a new and unfamiliar country hostile to their presence. The deportee's families, meanwhile, grapple with anxiety, blame and regret. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#702] In The Matter of Cha Jung Hee Her passport said she was Cha Jung Hee. She knew she was not. So began a 40-year deception for a Korean adoptee who came to the United States in 1966. Told to keep her true identity secret from her new American family, the 8-year-old girl quickly forgot she had ever been anyone else. But why had her identity been switched? And who was the real Cha Jung Hee? In the Matter of Cha Jung Hee is the search to find the answers, as acclaimed filmmaker Deann Borshay Liem (First Person Plural, POV 2000) returns to her native Korea to find her "double," the mysterious girl whose place she took in America. duration 52:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Simple Piece of Paper What happens when a state allows adopted citizens to have their original birth certificates? In 2011, Illinois became the largest state in the Union to reverse sealed records laws, providing adult adoptees access to the document recording their birth. 'A Simple Piece of Paper' tells the story of over a dozen adoptees, as they open their records. Their collective experiences provoke a new question: what would have happened if the records had been opened sooner? duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
Sunday, June 8, 2014

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Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH
KQED Plus, formerly KTEH.
Unique programs including the best British dramas, mysteries, and comedies.

PBS Kids

PBS Kids

Channel 54.4, 25.4, and 9.4
XFINITY 192 (Monterey/Salinas 372 and Sacramento/Fairfield 391)
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Quality children's programming. Live streaming 24/7 at pbskids.org.

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3, 54.3 and 25.3
XFINITY 190 Monterey/Salinas 371 and Sacramento/Fairfield 390)
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Thought-provoking television — public affairs, local and world events, nature, history, and science.