Donate

Upcoming Broadcasts:

Americas (#101H) Duration: 55:46 STEREO TVPG

As humans spread out across the world, their toughest challenge was to colonize the Americas - because of a huge ice sheet blocking their route. It has long been thought that pioneers - known as Clovis people - arrived about 13,000 years ago. But an underwater discovery in Mexico is forcing the story to be re-written. How closely related were the First Americans and today's Native Americans? It's a matter of huge controversy, focused on Kennewick Man. There are very few other skeletons in the world that engender such strong feelings.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sat, Jul 22, 2017 -- 6:00am Remind me

Africa (#102H) Duration: 55:46 STEREO TVPG

200,000 years ago, a new species appeared on the African landscape - Homo sapiens. Scientists imagined eastern Africa was a real-life Garden of Eden, but the latest research suggests we evolved in many places across the continent at the same time. Diversity is etched into our biological blueprint. DNA from a 19th Century African-American slave is forcing geneticists to re-think the origins of our species. The idea is that our ancestors met, mated and hybridized with other types of human in Africa - creating ever greater diversity within our species.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sat, Jul 22, 2017 -- 7:00am Remind me

Asia/Australia (#103H) Duration: 55:46 STEREO TVPG

What happened when we expanded out of Africa and into Asia - where did we go and whom did they meet along the way? The latest evidence suggests we left far earlier than previously thought and interbred with a newly-discovered type of ancient human - the Denisovans. The existence of these people was only established four years ago, when geneticists extracted DNA from a tiny fragment of finger bone. And because our ancestors mated with them, their genes found a home within our DNA. More than that, they've helped us survive and thrive.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sat, Jul 22, 2017 -- 8:00am Remind me

Australia (#104H) Duration: 55:46 STEREO TVPG

When Homo sapiens arrived in Australia, they were - for the first time - truly alone, surrounded by wildly different flora and fauna. How did they survive and populate a continent? There is a close cultural and genetic link between the First Australians and modern-day Aborigines - the ancient and modern story intersect here as nowhere else in the world. The secret to this continuity is diversity. Intuitively, they found the right balance between being separate and connected.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sat, Jul 22, 2017 -- 9:00am Remind me

Europe (#105H) Duration: 55:16 STEREO TVPG

When Homo sapiens turned up in prehistoric Europe, they ran into the Neanderthals. The two types of human were similar enough to interbreed - and they were just as capable at making artifacts. But as more Homo sapiens moved into Europe, there was an explosion of art and symbolic thought. The balance of power had shifted and Neanderthals were overwhelmed. Ever since, we've had Europe and the rest of the world to ourselves.

Upcoming Broadcasts:

  • KQED Plus: Sat, Jul 22, 2017 -- 10:00am Remind me
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV
    • 6/22-23 Ch9 & Ch54 Virtual ID issues

      (DT9-1 thru 9-3, and DT54-1 thru 54-5) KQED experienced a major technical issue with our Virtual ID info in our signals for DT9 and DT54, beginning apx 4pm Thursday 6/22, which was resolved apx 11am Friday 6/23. As background, almost every TV station in the Bay Area now transmits on a frequency which is different […]

    • 2/22/17: Fremont Peak tower transmissions, including KQET DT25

      (DT25.1 through 25.3) Recent storms have taken out dozens of trees on Fremont Peak, which in turn have taken down power lines leading to the transmission tower located on the peak. It has been running on generators for several days, and regular trips are scheduled to re-fuel those generators with gas. However, the truck has […]

    • KQED TV All Channels: Planned outage late Fri/early Sat 1/14 midnight-2am

      All KQED television channels will be off the air late Friday/early Saturday 1/14 beginning at midnight for approximately two hours to perform maintenance and upgrades to our electrical system. These improvements will help KQED maintain and continue our broadcast service to the community. We will return to our regularly scheduled programs as soon as work […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code.
Outstanding PBS programming, KQED original productions, and more.

All HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus / KQEH

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH
KQED Plus, formerly KTEH.
Unique programs including the best British dramas, mysteries, and comedies.

PBS Kids

PBS Kids

(starts Jan 16, 2017)
Channel
54.4, 25.3
XFINITY 192
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Quality children's programming. Live streaming 24/7 at pbskids.org.

KQED Life

KQED Life

Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Best of arts, food, gardening, how-to, and travel.

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3, 54.5
XFINITY 190
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Best of non-fiction programs including public affairs, local and world events, nature, history, and science.