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Episode #2003 Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG

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  • KQED World: Thu, May 24, 2018 -- 3:00am Remind me
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Guest: Blake Mycoskie (#2005) Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG

Can entrepreneurship and philanthropy truly meet organically? Most entrepreneurs are generous people, who derive great pleasure from philanthropy. The usual prescription is to slowly integrate charity work in a linear fashion as the company, and the profits, grow. One must first build the business, establish a solid foundation, make sure the profit margin is somewhat consistent, and then, indulge in giving back. But there are those entrepreneurs who are simply not satisfied with this sequence. They want the for-profit side of their firm to be closely intertwined with the charity side, from the get-go. Such is Blake Mycoskie, Bob's guest on the Entrepreneurs series, founder and CEO of TOMS. The idea behind TOMS is relatively simple, yet quite exceptional. It's "one-for-one". The customer buys a pair of TOMS shoes and in return, the company gives away a pair to a needy child. When Mycoskie started thinking about building his career, he had his mind set on doing it the way it's been done by most entrepreneurs, especially by those he looked up to: creating prosperity through his company and then, in the later stages of his life, donating away that wealth. One trip to Argentina, in 2006, convinced him of the urgency of giving back to those in dire need. He saw that there were many children who did not own even one single pair of shoes. This sad state of affairs, as he understood it, went deeper than just the obvious risks of foot-related diseases such as hookworm or podoconiosis. It also prevented those same children from attending school, since shoes are mandatory to most institutions' uniform. Not having footwear meant not having the same chances in life as others, it meant a depleted self-esteem and being cast aside. Mycoskie had not done endowment work before but felt a strong calling. "Instead of starting a charity where we ask people for donations and we're dependent on them every year, let's start a for-profit business, but let's build the giving into the model from day one", he thought, "so every time we sell a pair of shoes, a child who desperately needs one is getting a pair as well." Needless to say, this idea was strongly discouraged by his colleagues and consultants. How do you make a profit when you give away half your value? It quickly turned out that this business model was not only viable, but greatly profitable. People who bought TOMS shoes were their best ambassadors and marketing force. Appealing to a customer's better side made for huge advertisement that other companies would have paid to get. People shared their newly bought TOMS on social media, talked about them with family and friends and proudly displayed their charitable nature by the same token. TOMS offer the same quality and value as other big-brand names, at a competitive price. Being benevolent has never been more fashionable and accessible. The company has since diversified its production with added items such as ballet flats for women, men's boots, sunglasses and eyeglasses, but the core principle of "one-for-one" still remains. They focus their charity by working with local non-profits already established in targeted communities. These organisations are there to help in a myriad of ways, such as building schools, making sure there is drinking water, vaccines, anti-malaria nets, etc. TOMS works with them as they integrate the shoes into their health regimen. Meet the man who is walking his way over the rainbow, this week on The World Show.

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  • KQED World: Thu, May 24, 2018 -- 8:30pm Remind me

Guest: Eric Kandel (#2004) Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG

This week, thanks to a brilliant winner of the Nobel Prize, the entire forgotten world of the Austro-Hungarian empire comes to life. Eric Kandel is the author of The Age of Insight, a book about his native Vienna before and during WWII. He is Bob's guest in the Nobel Laureates series. Kandel is a passionate New Yorker, a great intellectual and a trailblazing neuroscientist. He recalls his youth, as Hitler marched into Vienna in 1938, after the Anschluss, when he was eight years old. 200,000 people turned out at the Heldenplatz to celebrate the triumphant Nazis, but the festivity soon turned into an outburst of violence against the Jews. He remembers how his school friends stopped talking to him and all the Jewish children were kicked out and sent to another institution on the outskirts of town. But most vivid in his memory is the day his family was ordered to move out of their small apartment and Eric had to leave behind his birthday presents (which had been bestowed a few days prior), especially that remote-controlled toy car he had long coveted and had just gotten, never to be seen again. Things unfolded very rapidly, as the threat and the fear were real. The two Kandel brothers, nine and fourteen years old, were separated from their parents and sent to live with an uncle in the United States. The young boys travelled alone by train to Brussels, and then to Antwerp where they boarded a ship crossing the Atlantic, bound for New York. In a happier turn of events, the children were reunited with their parents in America, just as the war broke out in Europe. Haunted by these early life experiences, Eric developed an affinity for the subject of history in class. His high school teacher was so impressed with him that he gave him the money to apply for Harvard when came time for him to choose a college. Kandel was accepted. His curiosity was rooted in the quest for fundamental answers: "how come the Viennese could one day be listening to Mozart and the next day be beating up their Jewish neighbors?" He studied history and literature at Harvard, but on the advice of a friend, he pursued a psychoanalysis curriculum to further probe the depths of the human brain. He spent summers in medical school while working as a psychiatrist in a hospital. Even though he graduated with honors, he needed more answers: "I wanted to know where in the cranium the id, the ego and the superego were located." A friend at Columbia University suggested that he should study the brain one cell at a time. And that's when the Nobel Prize-winning chapter of Eric Kandel's scientific career began: with a marine snail, aplysia, and the biologically materialist theory of reductionism. His older fellow citizen, Sigmund Freud, had meanwhile departed for London, so these Viennese geniuses furthered the world's understanding of the human soul, simultaneously, from both sides of the Atlantic. Meet the Nobel laureate in the bowtie, this week on The World Show.

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  • KQED World: Thu, May 31, 2018 -- 3:00am Remind me
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Episode #2106 Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)

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Episode #2105 Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)

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  • KQED World: Thu, Jun 7, 2018 -- 3:00am Remind me
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Episode #2107 Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)

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Episode #2108 Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)

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  • KQED World: Thu, Jun 14, 2018 -- 8:30pm Remind me
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Episode #2109 Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)

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  • KQED World: Thu, Jun 21, 2018 -- 8:30pm Remind me

Episode #2110 Duration: 26:46 STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)

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  • KQED World: Thu, Jun 28, 2018 -- 8:30pm Remind me
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