Donate

Burt Wolf: Travels & Traditions Previous Broadcasts

The Great Rivers of Europe: Nuremberg to Linz (Episode #1206H)

KQED Life: Thu, Dec 14, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

Burt starts off in Nuremberg with visits to the 900 year old Imperial Castle, the open farmers' market and his favorite spice cookie shop. Then he sails to Regensburg to visit the remains of an ancient Roman fort. Next he cruises through the Danube Gorge to Weltenburg Abbey where the Benedictine monks have been brewing one of Europe's great beers since 1050. In Linz, we learn about the Linzertorte and see the world's largest church organ.

Atlantic Crossing (Episode #1201H)

KQED Life: Thu, Dec 14, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

In 1911, Burt's grandmother and her one-year old daughter, Burt's mother, boarded a ship in Hamburg, Germany and immigrated to the United States. To mark this anniversary, Burt and his family sailed back to Europe on Cunard's Queen Mary -- same route, different accommodations. This program covers the history of transatlantic passenger ships and introduces you to what it is like today.

Women @ Work (Episode #1504H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Dec 13, 2017 -- 9:00 AM

Burt's mother was one of the first women executives at Macy's Department store. During the past few years, as Burt traveled around the world he began to see how things had changed for women in business and how some things had not changed. In this program he visits with leading authorities on the history of women at work. It took him to New York City, Fairfield, Connecticut, Washington, DC and Zurich, Switzerland.

Artcops (Episode #1205H)

KQED Life: Wed, Dec 13, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

As Burt visited the museums and galleries that are in his programs, he became aware of the extraordinary amount of great art that had been stolen - over 6 billion dollars worth each year. This program will tell you about some of the works that are missing, why they are an important part of our history, and what you can do to help find them and earn millions of dollars in reward money.

On The Road In America, Part 3 (Episode #1612H)

KQED Life: Wed, Dec 13, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

In the final episode, "Your Move," Burt introduces the concept of "migrations of convenience". Moving to the suburbs, industries and workers moving to the Sunbelt, tech industries and workers moving back into the gentrified consumer metropolises--each representing a different logic than the migrations of earlier periods.

The Great Rivers of Europe: Cochem to Luxembourg (Episode #1204H)

KQED Life: Tue, Dec 12, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

Burt cruises along the Mosel River with stops in Cochem and Bernkastel in the middle of the Mosel wine region. He also tours the city of Luxembourg and cooks with Lea Linster, one of Europe's leading chefs and a major television personality.

On The Road In America, Part 2 (Episode #1611H)

KQED Life: Tue, Dec 12, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

In the second program, "Pack Up Your Troubles," Burt continues the story. This time it's around the theme of wars and crisis, covering the two world wars and the depression. Wars often move people around. The labor force demands of WWI accelerated the move from farms to cities and initiated the Great Migration out of the South. The Depression slowed migration as worried people stayed close to home. The Dust Bowl migration, driven by environmental as well as an economic crisis, was the memorable exception.

The Great Rivers of Europe: Cologne to Zell (Episode #1203H)

KQED Life: Mon, Dec 11, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

Burt sails along the Rhine from Cologne to Rudesheim where he visits a museum dedicated to mechanical musical instruments. Along the way he passes the Lorelei Rock and explains the real story of how it got famous for luring ships into the rocks. Then he visits the city of Zell where the mayor and his band lead visitors in a parade through the streets of the town to a wine cellar underneath one of the government buildings.

On The Road In America, Part 1 (Episode #1610H)

KQED Life: Mon, Dec 11, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

"On the Road in America" is a 3-part mini-series that reports on the history of migrations within the United States - not how people got here, but how and why they moved around once they were here.
In the first program, "Tails of Hope and Tears," Burt retraces the big relocations of the 19th century. Native Americans were relocated and their ancestral lands turned over to European settlers. In addition, the government was in the process of giving away valuable mineral claims. And finally, there was the discovery of gold.

Have A Healthy Trip (Episode #1606H)

KQED Life: Sat, Dec 9, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

Burt has spent most of his life traveling around the world and one of his concerns has been protecting himself, his family and his film crew from illness. From time to time, no matter how much he liked a food, the food didn't like him. Burt talks to some of the leading authorities on what you can do to stay healthy when you travel and how to deal with reactions to food.

Cruising The Rivers of Europe: Amsterdam to Cologne (Episode #1202H)

KQED Life: Fri, Dec 8, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

During the past decade, cruising the great rivers of Europe has become one of the most popular vacations for American tourists. In this program, Burt introduces you to Amsterdam, tours a museum dedicated to the history of women's handbags, and sails along the Rhine to Cologne.

Visiting A Great Museum Can Reduce Stress (Episode #1609H)

KQED Life: Fri, Dec 8, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

For over 20 years, researchers have been studying the effects of drawing, painting and viewing works of art on brain functions. The results have been astounding. These activities can help prevent memory loss, increase mental fitness, stimulate your brain to grow new neurons, and increase the production of dopamine that improves your sense of wellbeing and the ability to focus your attention. In this program, Burt tours some of the world's great museums, talks to leading artists and medical researchers in order to understand the phenomenon.

Atlantic Crossing (Episode #1201H)

KQED Life: Thu, Dec 7, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

In 1911, Burt's grandmother and her one-year old daughter, Burt's mother, boarded a ship in Hamburg, Germany and immigrated to the United States. To mark this anniversary, Burt and his family sailed back to Europe on Cunard's Queen Mary -- same route, different accommodations. This program covers the history of transatlantic passenger ships and introduces you to what it is like today.

The Road to Ruin (Episode #1608H)

KQED Life: Thu, Dec 7, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

St. Augustine, Florida is the oldest city in the United States. Burt tours the town, looks into the history of Henry Flagler who built a railroad that turned Florida into "The American Riviera." He also visits Flagler College and learns about their Coastal Environmental project. St. Augustine was the place where the Spanish Conquistador, Juan Ponce De Leon searched for the Fountain of Youth. Throughout the program, Burt continues that investigation, with considerable success.

Nature Vs. Nurture (Episode #1503H)

KQED Plus: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 -- 9:00 AM

For hundreds of years, people have been arguing the issue of Nature vs. Nurture. Are we the result of our youthful experiences or the genes we inherited from our ancestors? Recently, scientists have come to the conclusion that our genes interact with our environment and we change constantly throughout our lives. Our biology is actually altered by our environment. To take a look at this question, Burt talked to a group of people who had grown up in the structured culture of Taiwan and in their early years moved to the more open culture of the United States. Among the people Burt talks to are Steve Chen co-inventor of YouTube and Justin Lin who makes the Fast and Furious films. Burt then travels to Taiwan to take a look at what influenced their youth.

On The Road In America, Part 3 (Episode #1612H)

KQED Life: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

In the final episode, "Your Move," Burt introduces the concept of "migrations of convenience". Moving to the suburbs, industries and workers moving to the Sunbelt, tech industries and workers moving back into the gentrified consumer metropolises--each representing a different logic than the migrations of earlier periods.

Tea for Two (Episode #1607H)

KQED Life: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

Tea is the second most widely consumed beverage in the world. Water is the first. Accordingly, tea has had a powerful impact on what we eat and drink, but it has also had an amazing influence on our music, art and literature. In this program Burt travels around the world talking to experts and looking at how tea has shown up in music (Tea for Two) in literature (Alice in Wonderland) and art (Norman Rockwell's Housewife At Tea Break).

On The Road In America, Part 2 (Episode #1611H)

KQED Life: Tue, Dec 5, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

In the second program, "Pack Up Your Troubles," Burt continues the story. This time it's around the theme of wars and crisis, covering the two world wars and the depression. Wars often move people around. The labor force demands of WWI accelerated the move from farms to cities and initiated the Great Migration out of the South. The Depression slowed migration as worried people stayed close to home. The Dust Bowl migration, driven by environmental as well as an economic crisis, was the memorable exception.

Have A Healthy Trip (Episode #1606H)

KQED Life: Tue, Dec 5, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

Burt has spent most of his life traveling around the world and one of his concerns has been protecting himself, his family and his film crew from illness. From time to time, no matter how much he liked a food, the food didn't like him. Burt talks to some of the leading authorities on what you can do to stay healthy when you travel and how to deal with reactions to food.

On The Road In America, Part 1 (Episode #1610H)

KQED Life: Mon, Dec 4, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

"On the Road in America" is a 3-part mini-series that reports on the history of migrations within the United States - not how people got here, but how and why they moved around once they were here.
In the first program, "Tails of Hope and Tears," Burt retraces the big relocations of the 19th century. Native Americans were relocated and their ancestral lands turned over to European settlers. In addition, the government was in the process of giving away valuable mineral claims. And finally, there was the discovery of gold.

Kansas City (Episode #1601H)

KQED Life: Sat, Dec 2, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

Burt visits Kansas City, discovers the history of Kansas City BBQ, visits the town's best BBQ joint and goes into their kitchens to checkout their technique. He visits the Kansas City Royals stadium, which is one of the few stadiums still standing that was originally built for baseball and learns about the team culture that has made them champions. He tours the city's great art museum and discovers the World War I Memorial Museum.

Visiting A Great Museum Can Reduce Stress (Episode #1609H)

KQED Life: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

For over 20 years, researchers have been studying the effects of drawing, painting and viewing works of art on brain functions. The results have been astounding. These activities can help prevent memory loss, increase mental fitness, stimulate your brain to grow new neurons, and increase the production of dopamine that improves your sense of wellbeing and the ability to focus your attention. In this program, Burt tours some of the world's great museums, talks to leading artists and medical researchers in order to understand the phenomenon.

Cruising The Baltic (Episode #1604H)

KQED Life: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 12:30 AM

Burt takes a look at the history of cruising and how it has changed and how much of it has remained the same during the past 200 years. The first luxury cruise ship was based in Italy, and was only available to the rich and famous. It offered excellent food, gambling, magnificent parties and guided tours. Burt's cruise starts in Portsmith, England and visit Belgium (Zeebrugge), Denmark (Copenhagen) , Germany (Berlin), Russia (St. Petersburg), Estonia (Tallinn) and Sweden (Stockholm).

Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV
    • Audio Issue KQED DT 9.1 /25.1

      UPDATE: Audio has been restored, please report any issues!  If you?re still experiencing audio issues, you may need to rescan your television. Visit kqed.org/54move to learn how. Thank you for your patience while we resolve the issue!

    • KQED will no longer broadcast the KQEH signal from Monument Peak Tower effective 1/5/2018

      KQED will be removing its over-the-air television signal from the Monument Peak Tower in the San Jose area on January 5, 2018 (Note: this maintenance was previously scheduled for December 15, 2017). KQED will now broadcast our full suite of channels (KQED 9, KQED Plus, KQED World and PBS Kids) on Channel 9 and 54 […]

    • KQED LIFE OFF AIR Friday, December 15

      KQED will no longer offer the KQED Life channel beginning Friday, December 15. Several of the most popular exercise, cooking and lifestyle programs exclusive to KQED Life will now be scheduled on KQED Plus and KQED 9, where they can be experienced by more viewers. View/Download Schedule

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code.
Outstanding PBS programming, KQED original productions, and more.

All HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus / KQEH

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH
KQED Plus, formerly KTEH.
Unique programs including the best British dramas, mysteries, and comedies.

PBS Kids

PBS Kids

Channel 54.4, 25.4, and 9.4
XFINITY 192 (Monterey/Salinas 372 and Sacramento/Fairfield 391)
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Quality children's programming. Live streaming 24/7 at pbskids.org.

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3, 54.3 and 25.3
XFINITY 190 Monterey/Salinas 371 and Sacramento/Fairfield 390)
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Thought-provoking television — public affairs, local and world events, nature, history, and science.