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Life On Fire Previous Broadcasts

Phoenix Temple (Episode #104H)

KQED Life: Sat, Apr 25, 2015 -- 2:00 AM

In the vast emptiness of the Pacific Ocean, tectonic movements construct or swallow islands. In the Tongan archipelago, two little-known animals have learned to cope with these ephemeral lands risen from the ocean depths: the sooty tern, a seabird that never dares wet its wings for fear of drowning, and the Alvin shrimp, a blind crustacean that manages to find its way around the abyss. When an underwater volcano becomes an island, the fates of these two extraordinary paradoxes are linked.

The Surprise Salmon (Episode #103H)

KQED Life: Sat, Apr 25, 2015 -- 1:00 AM

In Alaska, the fresh water that feeds the rivers is snowmelt from North America's highest mountains and most active volcanoes. Time and again, they erupt and poison the rivers. Scientists have only just begun to piece together what might have happened nearly 2,000 years ago, when one race of salmon faced the death of their natal river and were forced back to the open ocean on an exceptional adventure. Navigating between the sulphurous waters, bears, sharks and eagles, the fish escaped the Earth's wrath to give birth to descendants that continue their pioneering journey to the heart of an active volcano.

Phoenix Temple (Episode #104H)

KQED Life: Fri, Apr 24, 2015 -- 8:00 PM

In the vast emptiness of the Pacific Ocean, tectonic movements construct or swallow islands. In the Tongan archipelago, two little-known animals have learned to cope with these ephemeral lands risen from the ocean depths: the sooty tern, a seabird that never dares wet its wings for fear of drowning, and the Alvin shrimp, a blind crustacean that manages to find its way around the abyss. When an underwater volcano becomes an island, the fates of these two extraordinary paradoxes are linked.

The Surprise Salmon (Episode #103H)

KQED Life: Fri, Apr 24, 2015 -- 7:00 PM

In Alaska, the fresh water that feeds the rivers is snowmelt from North America's highest mountains and most active volcanoes. Time and again, they erupt and poison the rivers. Scientists have only just begun to piece together what might have happened nearly 2,000 years ago, when one race of salmon faced the death of their natal river and were forced back to the open ocean on an exceptional adventure. Navigating between the sulphurous waters, bears, sharks and eagles, the fish escaped the Earth's wrath to give birth to descendants that continue their pioneering journey to the heart of an active volcano.

Volcano Doctors (Episode #102H)

KQED Life: Sat, Apr 18, 2015 -- 2:00 AM

Whether the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Colombia, Chile, Italy or Iceland, each of these countries is home to active volcanoes that are a threat to the populations settled at their feet. Every day, lava, ash, gas, bombs and avalanches are likely to slide down the gaping mouths of the rock giants. To avoid disasters, volcanologists are asked to anticipate and warn. They are asked to be prophets and to know how to analyze the volcanoes' slightest tremors. Around the world, these volcano doctors use their tools and knowledge to try to protect those who live beneath the Earth's fire.

Icelandic Volcanoes (Episode #101H)

KQED Life: Sat, Apr 18, 2015 -- 1:00 AM

The 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland provoked economic chaos by paralyzing a major air traffic network for days. This eruption, however, was mild. Much more powerful volcanoes in Iceland are ready to wake up. Through spectacular aerial footage of this country, which is an accumulation of lava and ash, a maze of craters and faults, the episode tries to discern which volcano could wake up next and what the consequences of a major eruption are likely to be. Europe has come to realize that a colossal power sleeps beneath Iceland, while Icelanders for centuries have learned to live amongst their volcanoes.

Volcano Doctors (Episode #102H)

KQED Life: Fri, Apr 17, 2015 -- 8:00 PM

Whether the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, Colombia, Chile, Italy or Iceland, each of these countries is home to active volcanoes that are a threat to the populations settled at their feet. Every day, lava, ash, gas, bombs and avalanches are likely to slide down the gaping mouths of the rock giants. To avoid disasters, volcanologists are asked to anticipate and warn. They are asked to be prophets and to know how to analyze the volcanoes' slightest tremors. Around the world, these volcano doctors use their tools and knowledge to try to protect those who live beneath the Earth's fire.

Icelandic Volcanoes (Episode #101H)

KQED Life: Fri, Apr 17, 2015 -- 7:00 PM

The 2010 eruption of the Eyjafjallajokull volcano in Iceland provoked economic chaos by paralyzing a major air traffic network for days. This eruption, however, was mild. Much more powerful volcanoes in Iceland are ready to wake up. Through spectacular aerial footage of this country, which is an accumulation of lava and ash, a maze of craters and faults, the episode tries to discern which volcano could wake up next and what the consequences of a major eruption are likely to be. Europe has come to realize that a colossal power sleeps beneath Iceland, while Icelanders for centuries have learned to live amongst their volcanoes.

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV ? Transmitter Status
    • 7/27/18: Comcast Ch10 (SD version of KQED Plus)

      We are aware that Comcast is not broadcasting KQED Plus, SD version, on Ch 10 throughout most of the Bay Area. There is no problem with KQED’s signal, and the HD version of KQED Plus is still operational on Ch710. KQED Plus is also still available over the air on DT9.2, 54.1 and 25.2.  Despite … Continue reading 7/27/18: Comcast Ch10 (SD version of KQED Plus)

    • Update 7/27/18: KQET signal restored

      DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3, 25.4 UPDATE: Signal restored as of 7:45pm Friday afternoon (original post): KQET’s signal is down due to a break in the 3rd party fiber feed between San Francisco and the uplink reception point at California State University Monterey Bay. The line owner is aware of the issue and working on it.

    • 6/04/18: KQET Signal Loss

      KQET (DT25.1, 25.2 & 25.3) was unable to transmit from late Saturday 6/02 through early Monday 6/04 due to a break in the third party fiber feed somewhere between KQED?s Master Control room in San Francisco and the uplink reception point at California State University Monterey Bay. The break was found and fixed shortly after … Continue reading 6/04/18: KQET Signal Loss

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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