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Changing Seas Previous Broadcasts

Majestic Mantas (Episode #904)

KQED World: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

The remote Revillagegdo Archipelago off Mexico's Pacific coast is a hotspot for giant mantas that interact with awe-struck scuba divers. Scientists are studying the local population using photo ID techniques and acoustic tags which track the movements of these mysterious fish. They are also conducting experiments to see if the filter-feeding rays are impacted negatively by microplastics, tiny pieces of toxic trash that float in the ocean.

The Fate of Carbon (Episode #903)

KQED World: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 -- 8:00 AM

For millennia, the exchange of CO2 between the oceans and atmosphere has been in balance. Now, with more anthropogenic carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere, the oceans are taking up more CO2 as well. This additional CO2 is negatively impacting sensitive ecosystems through a process called ocean acidification, and scientists worry how changes to the ocean environment will affect the way carbon is cycled through the seas.

Majestic Mantas (Episode #904)

KQED World: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 -- 2:30 AM

The remote Revillagegdo Archipelago off Mexico's Pacific coast is a hotspot for giant mantas that interact with awe-struck scuba divers. Scientists are studying the local population using photo ID techniques and acoustic tags which track the movements of these mysterious fish. They are also conducting experiments to see if the filter-feeding rays are impacted negatively by microplastics, tiny pieces of toxic trash that float in the ocean.

The Fate of Carbon (Episode #903)

KQED World: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 -- 2:00 AM

For millennia, the exchange of CO2 between the oceans and atmosphere has been in balance. Now, with more anthropogenic carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere, the oceans are taking up more CO2 as well. This additional CO2 is negatively impacting sensitive ecosystems through a process called ocean acidification, and scientists worry how changes to the ocean environment will affect the way carbon is cycled through the seas.

Toxic Algae: Complex Sources and Solutions (Episode #902)

KQED World: Tue, Dec 5, 2017 -- 8:30 AM

Lake Okeechobee was once the blue heart of Florida, pumping fresh water down to the Everglades and beyond. But now that a dike and canal system control its flow, water releases from the lake periodically create putrid mats of blue green algae. Scientists think water pollution is to blame, and if something isn't done about it there could be irreparable damage to the environment, the local economy and people's health.

The Future of Seafood (Episode #901)

KQED World: Tue, Dec 5, 2017 -- 8:00 AM

It is estimated there will be two billion more people on the planet by mid-century. To feed this booming world population, more fish will need to be farmed than ever before. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable way is to move aquaculture operations offshore - where there is plenty of available space and strong currents flush out the pens to avoid polluting sensitive ecosystems.

Toxic Algae: Complex Sources and Solutions (Episode #902)

KQED World: Tue, Dec 5, 2017 -- 2:30 AM

Lake Okeechobee was once the blue heart of Florida, pumping fresh water down to the Everglades and beyond. But now that a dike and canal system control its flow, water releases from the lake periodically create putrid mats of blue green algae. Scientists think water pollution is to blame, and if something isn't done about it there could be irreparable damage to the environment, the local economy and people's health.

The Future of Seafood (Episode #901)

KQED World: Tue, Dec 5, 2017 -- 2:00 AM

It is estimated there will be two billion more people on the planet by mid-century. To feed this booming world population, more fish will need to be farmed than ever before. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable way is to move aquaculture operations offshore - where there is plenty of available space and strong currents flush out the pens to avoid polluting sensitive ecosystems.

Majestic Mantas (Episode #904)

KQED World: Sun, Dec 3, 2017 -- 2:30 AM

The remote Revillagegdo Archipelago off Mexico's Pacific coast is a hotspot for giant mantas that interact with awe-struck scuba divers. Scientists are studying the local population using photo ID techniques and acoustic tags which track the movements of these mysterious fish. They are also conducting experiments to see if the filter-feeding rays are impacted negatively by microplastics, tiny pieces of toxic trash that float in the ocean.

The Fate of Carbon (Episode #903)

KQED World: Sun, Dec 3, 2017 -- 2:00 AM

For millennia, the exchange of CO2 between the oceans and atmosphere has been in balance. Now, with more anthropogenic carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere, the oceans are taking up more CO2 as well. This additional CO2 is negatively impacting sensitive ecosystems through a process called ocean acidification, and scientists worry how changes to the ocean environment will affect the way carbon is cycled through the seas.

Toxic Algae: Complex Sources and Solutions (Episode #902)

KQED World: Sun, Dec 3, 2017 -- 1:30 AM

Lake Okeechobee was once the blue heart of Florida, pumping fresh water down to the Everglades and beyond. But now that a dike and canal system control its flow, water releases from the lake periodically create putrid mats of blue green algae. Scientists think water pollution is to blame, and if something isn't done about it there could be irreparable damage to the environment, the local economy and people's health.

The Future of Seafood (Episode #901)

KQED World: Sun, Dec 3, 2017 -- 1:00 AM

It is estimated there will be two billion more people on the planet by mid-century. To feed this booming world population, more fish will need to be farmed than ever before. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable way is to move aquaculture operations offshore - where there is plenty of available space and strong currents flush out the pens to avoid polluting sensitive ecosystems.

Majestic Mantas (Episode #904)

KQED World: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 1:30 PM

The remote Revillagegdo Archipelago off Mexico's Pacific coast is a hotspot for giant mantas that interact with awe-struck scuba divers. Scientists are studying the local population using photo ID techniques and acoustic tags which track the movements of these mysterious fish. They are also conducting experiments to see if the filter-feeding rays are impacted negatively by microplastics, tiny pieces of toxic trash that float in the ocean.

The Fate of Carbon (Episode #903)

KQED World: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 1:00 PM

For millennia, the exchange of CO2 between the oceans and atmosphere has been in balance. Now, with more anthropogenic carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere, the oceans are taking up more CO2 as well. This additional CO2 is negatively impacting sensitive ecosystems through a process called ocean acidification, and scientists worry how changes to the ocean environment will affect the way carbon is cycled through the seas.

Toxic Algae: Complex Sources and Solutions (Episode #902)

KQED World: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 12:30 PM

Lake Okeechobee was once the blue heart of Florida, pumping fresh water down to the Everglades and beyond. But now that a dike and canal system control its flow, water releases from the lake periodically create putrid mats of blue green algae. Scientists think water pollution is to blame, and if something isn't done about it there could be irreparable damage to the environment, the local economy and people's health.

The Future of Seafood (Episode #901)

KQED World: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 12:00 PM

It is estimated there will be two billion more people on the planet by mid-century. To feed this booming world population, more fish will need to be farmed than ever before. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable way is to move aquaculture operations offshore - where there is plenty of available space and strong currents flush out the pens to avoid polluting sensitive ecosystems.

Majestic Mantas (Episode #904)

KQED World: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 7:30 AM

The remote Revillagegdo Archipelago off Mexico's Pacific coast is a hotspot for giant mantas that interact with awe-struck scuba divers. Scientists are studying the local population using photo ID techniques and acoustic tags which track the movements of these mysterious fish. They are also conducting experiments to see if the filter-feeding rays are impacted negatively by microplastics, tiny pieces of toxic trash that float in the ocean.

The Fate of Carbon (Episode #903)

KQED World: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 7:00 AM

For millennia, the exchange of CO2 between the oceans and atmosphere has been in balance. Now, with more anthropogenic carbon-dioxide in the atmosphere, the oceans are taking up more CO2 as well. This additional CO2 is negatively impacting sensitive ecosystems through a process called ocean acidification, and scientists worry how changes to the ocean environment will affect the way carbon is cycled through the seas.

Toxic Algae: Complex Sources and Solutions (Episode #902)

KQED World: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 6:30 AM

Lake Okeechobee was once the blue heart of Florida, pumping fresh water down to the Everglades and beyond. But now that a dike and canal system control its flow, water releases from the lake periodically create putrid mats of blue green algae. Scientists think water pollution is to blame, and if something isn't done about it there could be irreparable damage to the environment, the local economy and people's health.

The Future of Seafood (Episode #901)

KQED World: Fri, Dec 1, 2017 -- 6:00 AM

It is estimated there will be two billion more people on the planet by mid-century. To feed this booming world population, more fish will need to be farmed than ever before. One way to increase fish production in a sustainable way is to move aquaculture operations offshore - where there is plenty of available space and strong currents flush out the pens to avoid polluting sensitive ecosystems.

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TV Technical Issues

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    • KQED will no longer broadcast the KQEH signal from Monument Peak Tower effective 1/5/2018

      KQED will be removing its over-the-air television signal from the Monument Peak Tower in the San Jose area on January 5, 2018 (Note: this maintenance was previously scheduled for December 15, 2017). KQED will now broadcast our full suite of channels (KQED 9, KQED Plus, KQED World and PBS Kids) on Channel 9 and 54 […]

    • KQED LIFE OFF AIR Friday, December 15

      KQED will no longer offer the KQED Life channel beginning Friday, December 15. Several of the most popular exercise, cooking and lifestyle programs exclusive to KQED Life will now be scheduled on KQED Plus and KQED 9, where they can be experienced by more viewers. View/Download Schedule

    • Scheduled Maintenance 8/21-8/25

      Next week, Sutro Tower will be switching most stations to their auxiliary antennas. KQED TV will be at half power on the lower auxiliary antenna, this will affect some of our Over The Air viewers. Maintenance is scheduled on August 21-25 from 9am through 4pm daily. Thank you for your patience!

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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