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Forgotten Ellis Island Previous Broadcasts

KQED World: Wed, Jul 5, 2017 -- 8:00 AM

"Forgotten Ellis Island" is the first film to be produced about the abandoned immigrant hospital on Ellis Island. During the great wave of immigration, twenty-two medical buildings sprawled across two islands adjacent to Ellis Island, the largest port of entry in the United States. Massive and modern, the hospital was America's first line of defense against contagious, often virulent disease. In the era before anti-biotics, tens of thousands of immigrant patients were separated from family, detained in the hospital, and healed from illness before becoming citizens. 350 babies were born in the hospital, 3,500 immigrants died there. For two years, the National Park Service gave producer, Lorie Conway, exclusive access to film the Ellis Island hospital buildings (before restoration efforts began) , as well as to interview former patients at the location. Original research was conducted over five years. Many never-before-published photographs are featured in the film as well as excerpts from oral histories with medical staff, ward matrons, and patients. As America wrestles once again with the issue of immigration, "Forgotten Ellis Island" provides a unique lens on this contentious debate. It is a powerful tribute to the best and worst of America's dealings with its new citizens-to-be.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 8, 2017 -- 2:00 AM

KQED Plus: Wed, Jul 5, 2017 -- 5:00 AM

The little known stories of the patients and staff of the Ellis Island Hospital come to life in this program by filmmaker Lorie Conway. A century ago, in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty, one of the world's greatest public hospitals was built. Massive and modern, the hospital's 22 state-of-the-art buildings were crammed onto two small islands. The Ellis Island Hospital was at once welcoming and foreboding, a fateful crossroad for hundreds of thousands of hopeful immigrants. Those nursed to health were allowed entry to America. Those deemed feeble of body or mind were deported.

KQED World: Wed, Jul 5, 2017 -- 2:00 AM

"Forgotten Ellis Island" is the first film to be produced about the abandoned immigrant hospital on Ellis Island. During the great wave of immigration, twenty-two medical buildings sprawled across two islands adjacent to Ellis Island, the largest port of entry in the United States. Massive and modern, the hospital was America's first line of defense against contagious, often virulent disease. In the era before anti-biotics, tens of thousands of immigrant patients were separated from family, detained in the hospital, and healed from illness before becoming citizens. 350 babies were born in the hospital, 3,500 immigrants died there. For two years, the National Park Service gave producer, Lorie Conway, exclusive access to film the Ellis Island hospital buildings (before restoration efforts began) , as well as to interview former patients at the location. Original research was conducted over five years. Many never-before-published photographs are featured in the film as well as excerpts from oral histories with medical staff, ward matrons, and patients. As America wrestles once again with the issue of immigration, "Forgotten Ellis Island" provides a unique lens on this contentious debate. It is a powerful tribute to the best and worst of America's dealings with its new citizens-to-be.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 8, 2017 -- 2:00 AM

KQED Plus: Tue, Jul 4, 2017 -- 11:00 PM

The little known stories of the patients and staff of the Ellis Island Hospital come to life in this program by filmmaker Lorie Conway. A century ago, in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty, one of the world's greatest public hospitals was built. Massive and modern, the hospital's 22 state-of-the-art buildings were crammed onto two small islands. The Ellis Island Hospital was at once welcoming and foreboding, a fateful crossroad for hundreds of thousands of hopeful immigrants. Those nursed to health were allowed entry to America. Those deemed feeble of body or mind were deported.

KQED World: Sun, Jul 2, 2017 -- 6:00 PM

"Forgotten Ellis Island" is the first film to be produced about the abandoned immigrant hospital on Ellis Island. During the great wave of immigration, twenty-two medical buildings sprawled across two islands adjacent to Ellis Island, the largest port of entry in the United States. Massive and modern, the hospital was America's first line of defense against contagious, often virulent disease. In the era before anti-biotics, tens of thousands of immigrant patients were separated from family, detained in the hospital, and healed from illness before becoming citizens. 350 babies were born in the hospital, 3,500 immigrants died there. For two years, the National Park Service gave producer, Lorie Conway, exclusive access to film the Ellis Island hospital buildings (before restoration efforts began) , as well as to interview former patients at the location. Original research was conducted over five years. Many never-before-published photographs are featured in the film as well as excerpts from oral histories with medical staff, ward matrons, and patients. As America wrestles once again with the issue of immigration, "Forgotten Ellis Island" provides a unique lens on this contentious debate. It is a powerful tribute to the best and worst of America's dealings with its new citizens-to-be.

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED World: Sat, Jul 8, 2017 -- 2:00 AM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 3, 2017 -- 12:00 PM
  • KQED World: Mon, Jul 3, 2017 -- 6:00 AM
  • KQED World: Sun, Jul 2, 2017 -- 10:00 PM

KQED Plus: Sat, Jul 1, 2017 -- 8:00 AM

The little known stories of the patients and staff of the Ellis Island Hospital come to life in this program by filmmaker Lorie Conway. A century ago, in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty, one of the world's greatest public hospitals was built. Massive and modern, the hospital's 22 state-of-the-art buildings were crammed onto two small islands. The Ellis Island Hospital was at once welcoming and foreboding, a fateful crossroad for hundreds of thousands of hopeful immigrants. Those nursed to health were allowed entry to America. Those deemed feeble of body or mind were deported.

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TV Technical Issues

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    • Scheduled Maintenance 8/21-8/25

      Next week, Sutro Tower will be switching most stations to their auxiliary antennas. KQED TV will be at half power on the lower auxiliary antenna, this will affect some of our Over The Air viewers. Maintenance is scheduled on August 21-25 from 9am through 4pm daily. Thank you for your patience!

    • 6/22-23 Ch9 & Ch54 Virtual ID issues

      (DT9-1 thru 9-3, and DT54-1 thru 54-5) KQED experienced a major technical issue with our Virtual ID info in our signals for DT9 and DT54, beginning apx 4pm Thursday 6/22, which was resolved apx 11am Friday 6/23. As background, almost every TV station in the Bay Area now transmits on a frequency which is different […]

    • 2/22/17: Fremont Peak tower transmissions, including KQET DT25

      (DT25.1 through 25.3) Recent storms have taken out dozens of trees on Fremont Peak, which in turn have taken down power lines leading to the transmission tower located on the peak. It has been running on generators for several days, and regular trips are scheduled to re-fuel those generators with gas. However, the truck has […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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