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History Detectives Previous Broadcasts

Pretty Boy Floyd Handgun/Paul Cuffee Muster Roll/Pop Lloyd Baseball Field (Episode #210Z)

KQED 9: Fri, Dec 29, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Pretty Boy Floyd Handgun - A man in La Verne, California, owns a vintage Colt automatic handgun, which family legend suggests once belonged to the Depression-era desperado, Charles "Pretty Boy" Floyd. According to the legend, Floyd gave the gun to the contributor's uncle who had served as the lookout for "Pretty Boy." To find out if the story behind the gun is true, Wes Cowan travels to California, Oklahoma and Missouri. In the process, he discovers why gangsters became heroes to the rural population of the Midwest and reveals the true story behind the dramatic rise and fall of a man who ranks alongside Bonnie and Clyde and John Dillinger as one of the most colorful bank robbers in American history.
* Paul Cuffee Muster Roll - A Las Vegas man owns an old Continental Armymuster roll issued by the town of Falmouth, Massachusetts, in July 1780. Among the 16 men listed is "Paul Cuffee." The contributor wants to know if this could be evidence of an unknown episode in the life of Cuffee, a remarkable African American who was a whaling captain, shipbuilder and early advocate of the "Back to Africa" movement. HD uncovers a dramatic story of African-American achievement in the years surrounding the Revolutionary War.
* Pop Lloyd Baseball Field - Why was a baseball field in Atlantic City, New Jersey, named after an African-American ballplayer in a time of intense racial tension? HD goes to the park to unearth the explanation. John Henry "Pop" Lloyd was one of the greatest athletes of his time. A famed shortstop in the Negro Leagues throughout the first three decades of the 20th century, Pop was honored with a field in his name in 1949. What was the reasoning that led to this unlikely honor in a time of blatant prejudice and racial division?

Lost Gold Ship/John Hunt Morgan Saddle/Cesar Chavez Banner (Episode #209Z)

KQED 9: Thu, Dec 28, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Lost Gold Ship - Environmentalist Gabriel Scott was working in the Copper River Delta near Cordova, Alaska, when he came across the wreckage of an old ship. According to locals, these are the remains of the SS Portland, the famous steamship that carried 68 miners and nearly two tons of gold from the Klondike River to Seattle harbor and began the great Klondike Gold Rush of 1897. Could the stories be true? To find out, Elyse Luray joins a team of experts in Alaska to investigate the wreck. Mixing maritime history and forensic science, the team reveals the dramatic story of the SS Portland and confirms whether Scott has found the remains of this legendary ship.
* John Hunt Morgan Saddle - A man in Paris, Kentucky, owns a beautifully preserved Western-style saddle, believed to have been used by the Confederate general, John Hunt Morgan, on his famous raid into Kentucky, Indiana and Ohio in July 1863. Could this be a relic from one of the most audacious attacks launched by the South during the Civil War? Wes Cowan is on the case and reveals a surprising personal connection: Wes' great-grandfather was actually one of "Morgan's Raiders" and was captured alongside Morgan during the historic raid.
* Cesar Chavez Banner - A San Francisco woman has heard about a beautiful old banner owned by a local archive that, rumor has it, was carried at the head of the famous Delano Grape Boycott march led by Cesar Chavez in 1966. The banner features a painted Virgin of Guadalupe and a Union of Farm Workers Eagle, but its original ownership is a mystery. The contributor wants to know what role this banner may have played in Chavez' campaign to pursue better living conditions and rights for Mexican-American farm workers. HD travels to the West Coast to investigate the importance of art in one of the most famous civil rights campaigns in U.S. history.

Bonnie & Clyde/Revolutionary War Poem/Portrait of George Washington (Episode #208Z)

KQED 9: Wed, Dec 27, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Bonnie & Clyde - Could bullets owned by a woman in Brodhead, Wisconsin, be responsible for the demise of the notorious Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow? HD travels to key cities throughout the country in an attempt to link the bullets to the murderous twosome. Along the way, they chat with various experts and run extensive ballistics tests. Are these really the bullets that ended one of the most infamous crime sprees in American history?
* Revolutionary War Poem - HD goes to Salem, Oregon, to look into the story of a Revolutionary War poem found 25 years ago hidden in an antique trunk. The document appears to have been written by an American named Dan Goodhue while imprisoned in 1780 as a POW in England. Who was this man and how did his poem travel for over two centuries, across the sea and nation, to end up in Oregon?
* Portrait of George Washington - Could a portrait passed down through a Frederick, Maryland, family actually be an authentic portrait of the nation's first president, George Washington? That is the charge for HD in this fascinating story. The investigators attempt to prove whether or not the famed artist Gilbert Stuart, whose resume includes the portrait of Washington that appears on today's dollar bill, was the artist behind the drawing in question. Might this drawing prove to be a national treasure?

Ventriloquist Dummy/Witch's House/Poems (Episode #207Z)

KQED 9: Tue, Dec 26, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Ventriloquist Dummy - An African-American woman in Brooklyn, New York, has her father's black ventriloquist dummy, "Sam. " Her father, John Cooper, was the first famous African-American ventriloquist. In a time of minstrel stereotypes, did "Sam" help transform how Americans viewed race in the early 20th century? How was this dummy created and was it meant to be a protest against racial prejudice?
* Witch's House - Could a house in Essex County, Massachusetts, have once belonged to an accused witch? HD heads to New England to research the likelihood with local historians and a descendant of the accused witch, Martha Carrier, who was executed by hanging in 1692 during the infamous Salem Witch Trials. Might the woman who was called the "Queen of Hell" have owned this home?
* Poems - In the first half of the 20th century, nearly 250,000 Chinese immigrants attempted to enter the United States. Because of discrimination against Chinese and laws meant to impede their passage, most were detained and interrogated on Angel Island, America's West Coast immigration center in San Francisco. The experience of these immigrants is documented in hundreds of poems that have been carved into the walls of the Angel Island detention center. Many of these have been translated, but little is known about the authors. Kathleen Wong, a second-generation Chinese American, believes that her grandfather and great- grandfather spent time on the island and that her great-grandfather may have died there. She knows little about her ancestors' experience on Angel Island and their possible connection with the poems. HD investigates the story of her family's passage to the United States to find out if any of the poems were written by her ancestors.

Preston Brook's Riding Crop/Home of Lincoln Assassination Plot/Revolutionary War Cannon (Episode #206Z)

KQED 9: Mon, Dec 25, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Preston Brook's Riding Crop - A Long Island man owns a beautiful old riding crop he claims was given to an ancestor by the president of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis. But this is no ordinary present. Its owner believes it was given to Preston Brooks to congratulate him for beating anti-slavery campaigner Charles Sumner senseless in the Senate - a public attack many regard as a significant moment in America's move toward division and Civil War. To find out if the story behind the crop is true, HD taps into New York City, Columbus, Georgia, and Sea Cliff, New York, where they unravel a startling story of politics, filibustering and mistaken identity.
* Home of Lincoln Assassination Plot - A resident of Greenwich Village, New York, has a question about the home she's been living in for the last few years. She's heard a rumor that John Wilkes Booth, the infamous assassin of Abraham Lincoln, spent some time in her house. Not only that, she's heard that her home is where the plot for the assassination was hatched. Is this really where Lincoln's murder was planned?
* Revolutionary War Cannon - A Boston woman is fascinated by an old cannon kept in a local national park storage facility. She has heard that in 1774, members of the Boston Militia stole the cannon from the Boston Armory and hid it on her ancestor's land. Could the attempt by British forces to retrieve this and other cannons have precipitated the first battle of the Revolutionary War? HD travels to Massachusetts to investigate exciting evidence, shedding light on events leading up to the War of Independence and the founding of the United States.

Dueling Pistols/Evelyn Nesbit Portrait/Little Big Horn Bayonet (Episode #205Z)

KQED 9: Fri, Dec 22, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Dueling Pistols - A San Francisco bank owns two antique pistols, allegedly used in the last great duel on U.S. soil. The duel between abolitionist Senator David Broderick and then-California Supreme Court Justice David Terry was fought in 1856. One hundred fifty years later, a bank employee wants to know if these guns are authentic - and more about the duel. HD is on the case to find out what really happened. Was it about slavery or honor? Did the duel influence the outcome of the Civil War?
* Evelyn Nesbit Portrait - A woman in New Jersey owns a portrait she believes is a lost masterpiece by one of America's greatest illustrators and artists, Howard Chandler Christy. The painting's subject may be Evelyn Nesbit, the actress and model who came to fame in 1906 when her husband killed a famous architect accused of "taking advantage" of her. The resulting scandal rocked New York in the early1900s and the subsequent legal proceedings became the "trial of the century." But is this painting authentic? Can HD shed light on that famous case? In a wide-ranging investigation, the detectives reveal startling conclusions about the history of American art, the scandals of "Gilded Age" society and changing ideas of female beauty.
* Little Big Horn Bayonet - In Cookstown, New Jersey, the family home of the famous military hero General Edward Godfrey holds a surprising secret. Recent renovations revealed an old bayonet hidden in the attic rafters. The mayor of the town, Sharon Atkinson, knows that Godfrey was a colleague of General George Custer and fought alongside him at the battle of Little Big Horn. HD sets out to determine if the bayonet could have been used in that battle. Could this town own a silent witness to one of the largest massacres of U.S. soldiers by American Indians in 19th-century history?

The First Movie Studio/Ufa Light/King Kong Camera (Episode #204Z)

KQED 9: Thu, Dec 21, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* The First Movie Studio - Lincoln Heights, a quiet neighborhood in northeast Los Angeles, is located far from the glitz and glamour normally associated with Hollywood. But a resident of Lincoln Heights thinks the city's first motion picture studio may be located in her very own neighborhood park. Could a broken gateway once have been the grand entrance to the beginning of Hollywood history? HD travels to California - and it's lights, camera, action!
* UFA Light - When a California man bought an antique Kaschie lighter for $50 at a flea market, he didn't realize he was buying a piece of Hollywood history. The beautiful German lighter is a collectible in itself, but the engraving may make it even more valuable: "Harry Warner" on one side and "Ufatone" on the other. Harry Warner is one of the Warner brothers of the eponymous studio that produced movies aimed at garnering support for America's entry into World War II. Ufa was Germany's largest studio and Hollywood's biggest competition. So what are the names of these competitors doing on the same lighter? And what is the connection between Harry Warner, known for his anti- fascist commitment, and a studio that became the propaganda tool of the Nazi party? HD is on the case!
* King Kong Camera - A Washington resident owns an old movie camera he believes could have been used to film the original version of "King Kong." Released in 1933, the movie was a milestone in story-telling and special effects, and spawned several remakes, including one currently in pre-production under the direction of Peter Jackson. To investigate the camera's claim to fame, HD visits Washington State, San Francisco and Los Angeles, where they meet legendary animator Ray Harryhausen and discover the true story behind the ape with a weakness for blondes.

WWII Land Craft/The Abolitionist Flag/Mail OrderBrides (Episode #203Z)

KQED 9: Wed, Dec 20, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* LCT103/WW2 Land Craft - In the harbor of Bayfield, Wisconsin, a craft used for dredging and hauling rocks may hold a dramatic secret. A local man whose father fought in the World War II claims that 60 years ago the vessel played a vital role in the D-Day landings, transporting American tanks onto the beaches of Normandy. Could this ship really be one of the 1,500 "Landing Craft Tanks" designed and built to support the amphibious landings of the war? And did it really see action off the beaches of France? HD goes to Wisconsin and investigates.
* The Abolitionist Flag - Two Michigan brothers uncovered what they believed was just an old sheet in a family trunk. But could this "sheet" have actually contributed to the end of slavery in America? Was it a flag that an ancestor may have used to campaign for the creation of Free States? Or was it used as propaganda in a pivotal pre-Civil War campaign? HD explores the politically charged abolition movement to reveal the unknown and surprising past of this family and their flag.
* Mail Order Brides - In California, a photograph collector owns four small images of women taken in Chicago in the 1890s. On the back of one of the portraits are personal details and comments about the woman's inheritance, leading this collector to believe these are advertisements for mail order brides. Could he be right? HD visits California and Chicago to investigate the Victorian marriage industry, and discovers a shocking story of late 19th- century extortion and corruption.

Monopoly/Japanese Internment Camp Artwork/The Lewis and Clark Cane (Episode #202Z)

KQED 9: Tue, Dec 19, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Monopoly - A man in Delaware has an old board game that bears a remarkable similarity to Monopoly, but was made 20 years before Parker Brothers patented their creation. Could he own the earliest version of the world's best-selling board game? To solve this mystery, HD investigates Monopoly's history and discovers a surprising story. Rather than originating in the Great Depression of the 1930s, Monopoly could be a much older game, reflecting an economic argument that - if followed - would have created a radically different economy from today's.
* Japanese Internment Camp Artwork - In a San Francisco historical archive, an intern recently discovered a set of 10 postcard-size watercolors of what appears to be a prison camp. Piecing them together, the intern was surprised to find they were painted on the back of a Japanese-American internment notice from 1942. What is the story behind these paintings? Who was the artist? And what was his or her fate? HD travels to the West Coast to solve the puzzle, uncovering the dramatic story of one of the 120,000 Americans citizens who spent years behind barbed wire, guilty only of being of Japanese descent.
* The Lewis and Clark Cane - A Minnesota man has an old wooden cane that has been in his family for as long as he can remember. The family tale is that Meriwether Lewis and William Clark gave the cane to his ancestor in return for assistance they received during the famous Corps of Discovery expedition. HD attempts to find out if the owner of the cane is related to this early St. Louis fur trader. Is it possible that the family legend is true? Was this cane a gift from Lewis and Clark?

Civil War-Era Submarine/Red Cloud's Pipe/The Edison House (Episode #201Z)

KQED 9: Mon, Dec 18, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Civil War-Era Submarine - In Louisiana's bustling French Quarter sits a surprising remnant of American warfare - a Civil War-era submarine. Salvaged from the depths of a New Orleans lake, the origin of this vessel remains a murky mystery. As a young boy, the New Orleans contributor was fascinated by the presence of the iron-clad vessel and its unknown origin. As an adult, he discovered that one of his ancestors may have helped build this sub, contributing to the advanced military innovations spurred by the Civil War. Will the History Detectives rescue the story of this Louisiana man's ancestor and bring the early history of America's secretive underwater warfare to the surface?
* Red Cloud's Pipe - In California, a viewer owns an American Indian pipe that family legend suggests was given to her ancestor by the famous warrior Chief Red Cloud. The contributor knows that her great-great-grandfather was the Indian agent who moved the Oglala Lakota to the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Would Chief Red Cloud have given such a gift to a U.S. government official? The quest for the answer takes HD back to the turbulent days of the 1 870s; the team uncovers a battle of wills and political scandal reaching the highest levels of government, reverberating today.
* The Edison House - A Union, New Jersey, resident has heard a strange story about his home: that it was designed and built by inventor Thomas Edison. But Edison is known for inventing the motion-picture camera, electric lighting and wireless telegraphy, not house construction. History detective and architectural historian Gwen Wright investigates and discovers a surprising story of technological innovation, failed inventions and an approach to housing that was 30 years ahead of its time.

The Love Dish, Rebel Gun, Prison Plaque (Episode #110Z)

KQED 9: Fri, Dec 15, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* The Love Dish - Hearts and arrows blaze across an unusual set of china at the Powel House in Philadelphia. Family legend claims the Marquis de Lafayette gave the set to Elizabeth Willing, the popular wife of the Patriot Mayor. The History Detectives look into the facts and fiction behind this racy 18th century gift.
* Rebel Gun - Mercer County Historical Society has in its possession a late 18th century flint-lock rifle, which, according to local lore, once belonged to legendary Tory bandit Moses Doan, and was recovered after he was killed in a raid of his hideout in 1783. The Society would like to know: Was this the gun of one of the most infamous bandits operating to undermine the birth of our nation? The History Detectives travel west of Philadelphia, our nation's first capital, to uncover the truth.
* Prison Plaque - In the heart of Philadelphia, stands the abandoned Eastern State Penitentiary building. Founded by Quakers in 18 29, this castle-like structure set new standards for prisons across the country with its progressive ideas for rehabilitation. Recently, a group in charge of preserving this historic structure found a strange plaque discarded in a pile of rubbish. Dusting it off, they found an intriguing inscription: "In the everlasting memory of the inmates of Eastern State Penitentiary who served in World War I". Even more intriguing is that fact that they are listed not by name, but by their prison numbers. From what they know, convicted felons were prohibited from enlisting or being drafted to fight in the war. Is this an example of the prison's progressive take on prisoner reform? Or is this a sign of desperate recruiting measures for the "War to end all wars", where even prisoners are being sent into battle? The History Detectives are on the case to get to the bottom of this mystery.

Sheridan's House, Mark Twain Watch, Prisoner Poem (Episode #109Z)

KQED 9: Thu, Dec 14, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Sheridan's House - On a dusty back road in the town of Grand Ronde, Oregon sits what appears to be an abandoned, early 2 0th Century Dutch Colonial Style home. But is it? Research conducted on behalf of the Oregon State Department of Parks and Recreation recently revealed an astounding discovery. At the core of the house is a U.S. Army officer's quarters - one of four built in the 1850's at nearby Fort Yamhill on the border of a Native American reservation. The construction of these buildings was supervised by a young officer who was destined to become one of the Union Army's greatest generals and a ruthless foe for Native Americans in the Far West. Now local residents want the History Detectives to find out -- was this the home of General Philip Sheridan?
* Mark Twain Watch - An Oregon man, Jack Ainsworth Mills, has a watch that may have been a gift to his grandfather from noted American author, Samuel Clemens, otherwise known as Mark Twain. Mr. Mills has always wondered how his grandfather, Captain Ainsworth, a prominent Oregonian, could have met Clemens, and why he would have been given such a gift. The History Detectives will follow the trail of these two adventurous men to discover if their paths could have ever crossed, to determine if the Mills family legend could be true.
* Prisoner Poem - History Detectives goes to Salem, Oregon to look into the story of a Revolutionary War poem found 25 years ago hidden in an antique trunk. The document appears to have been written by an American named Dan Goodhue while imprisoned in 1780 as a POW in England. Who was this man and how did his poem travel for over two centuries, across the sea and nation, to end up in Oregon?

Ventriloquist Dummy/Home of Lincoln Assassination Plot/34 Star Flag (Episode #108Z)

KQED 9: Wed, Dec 13, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Ventriloquist Dummy - An African American woman in Brooklyn, New York, has her father's black ventriloquist dummy, "Sam." Her father, John Cooper, was the first famous African-American ventriloquist. In a time of minstrel stereotypes, did "Sam" help transform how Americans viewed race in the early 20th century? How was this dummy created, and was it meant to be a protest against racial prejudice? < br />* Home of Lincoln Assassination Plot - A resident of Greenwich Village, New York, has a question about the home in which she's been living for the last few years. She's heard a rumor that John Wilkes Booth, the infamous assassin of Abraham Lincoln, spent some time in her house. Not only that, she's heard that her home is where the plot for the assassination was hatched. Is this really where Lincoln's murder was planned?
* 34 Star Flag - Twenty years ago, the Staten Island Historical Society received a beautiful 34-star flag and a fascinating mystery. Patched together with bits of fabric much like a quilt, the flag flew at a boarding house on Staten Island. According to local legend, an angry mob approached the owner of the boarding house. The mob claimed that one of his boarders had hung a Confederate flag outside the window. It was just before the outbreak of the Civil War, and with tensions running high the mob was threatening to burn down the boarding house. As several other buildings were already in flames, the owner knew to take them seriously. He ran back to tear down the flag, but that did not satisfy the crowd. To save his building from being burnt to the ground, he replaced the rebel flag with the 34-star U.S. flag. The Staten Island Historical Society wants to know, is there any truth to this story?

The Depot That Made Dallas, Mexican Peso, Pirate Spyglass (Episode #107Z)

KQED 9: Tue, Dec 12, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* The Depot That Made Dallas - A local historian in Dallas, Texas, has a question about an early railroad station in the middle of Dallas. He wants to know if this building was the first railroad station in Texas - and if so, was it responsible for creating the bustling metropolis that Dallas is today? HD hits town to investigate this railroad mystery.
* Mexican Peso - A man from San Antonio, Texas, found what looked like Mexican currency among his late great-grandfather's possessions. Are they linked to the Mexican bandits Zapata and Pancho Villa? Did they play a part in the Mexican revolution in the1910s and if so, how did they get into the hands of his great-grandfather, a quiet family man from San Antonio?
* Pirate Spyglass - Jean Lafitte has been called a fearsome pirate, an ingenious privateer and a war hero. His exploits are still recounted today in Texas and Louisiana. A librarian in Texas City, Texas, has a spyglass she believes may once have belonged to Lafitte. Old, but still in working condition, the object was donated to the local library by a descendent of Jim Campbell - a founder of the town and one of Lafitte's captains. Did Jean Lafitte give his trusted captain a spyglass, and if he did - is this Jean Lafitte's spyglass?

John Brown's Letters, Japanese House, Poems (Episode #106Z)

KQED 9: Mon, Dec 11, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* John Brown's Letters - Sacramento, California--A woman in Sacramento, California, has reason to believe she may be a relative of John Brown, the 19th-century abolitionist. Do her grandmother's letters prove that she is a descendant of the historical figure? The Detectives attempt to answer her query once and for all with a series of investigations into the authenticity of the letters and her family tree. Will this investigation prove to be a crucial piece in the puzzle of her family history?
* Japanese Tea House - Gilroy, California--How did an authentic Japanese tea house become part of the famed San Francisco World's Fair in a time just preceding World War II? The Detectives attempt to reveal the origins of the tea house and explain how it came to be featured in the fair at a time shortly before Japanese internment camps were established. How did the tea house make its way to America in the first place, and who was behind its inclusion in the fair?
* Poems -San Francisco, California--In the first half of the 20th century, nearly 250,000 Chinese immigrants attempted to enter the United States. Because of discrimination against Chinese, and laws meant to impede their passage, most were detained and interrogated on Angel Island, America's west coast immigration center. The experience of these immigrants is documented in hundreds of poems that have been carved into the walls of the Angel Island detention center. Many of these have been translated, but little is known about the authors. Kathleen Wong, a second-generation Chinese-American, believes that her grandfather and great-grandfather spent time on the island and that her great-grandfather committed suicide there. She knows little about her ancestors' experience on Angel Island and their possible connection with the poems. History Detectives will investigate the story of her family's passage to the United States to find out if any of the poems were written by her ancestors.

Lee's Last Orders, Natchez House, Napoleonic Sword (Episode #105Z)

KQED 9: Fri, Dec 8, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Lee's Last Orders - Beech Island, South Carolina--In the archives of a gentleman's club in this rural town is what is believed to be a signed copy of one of the most famous documents in the history of the Civil War - Confederate General Robert E. Lee's farewell address, " General Order #9," composed at Appomattox, Virginia, upon the surrender of his troops in April 1865. The Beech Island Agricultural Club, a social organization formed by local plantation owners in the 1840s, has owned this copy for almost 120 years. Now, Milledge Murray, the group's membership chair and a descendant of one of the club's founders, has asked History Detectives to find out if local lore is true - is this really the "original" copy of "General Order #9?"
* Natchez House - Natchez, Mississippi-- On the "Spanish Esplanade" overlooking the Mississippi River, there is a magnificent home that for years was believed to be the original home of one of the Spanish dons who colonized the area. Recently, this story was discovered to be a myth. The original owner was actually a free man of color named Robert D. Smith, who built it himself in 1851, 14 years before the Emancipation Proclamation. The new homeowners, Ruth and Jim Coy, have been actively pursuing the history of Robert Smith and they have a question. According to a recently discovered record, Smith arrived in New Orleans on a slave ship. How did Robert Smith go from traveling on a ship full of captive individuals destined for servitude to owning a luxurious home? The Detectives trace the rise of this unique individual.
* Napoleonic Sword - St. Martinville, Louisiana--A magnificent sword that has been handed down for generations in a St. Martinville family has a mystery around it. The sword belonged to their great-great- grandfather, who was a doctor/soldier in Napoleon's battle for Austria in Wagram. Family lore has it that Napoleon was injured and their great-great grandfather treated his wound. He was rewarded with this sword. Is this really the sword of Napoleon?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Sat, Dec 9, 2017 -- 12:00 AM

Portrait of George Washington, Patty Cannon, Trumpet (Episode #104Z)

KQED 9: Thu, Dec 7, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Portrait of George Washington - Washington, DC--Could a portrait passed down through a Washington, DC, family for generations actually be an authentic portrait of the nation's first president, George Washington? That is the charge for the Detectives in this fascinating episode. The investigators attempt to prove whether or not the famed artist Gilbert Stuart, whose resume includes the portrait of Washington that appears on today's dollar bills, was the artist behind the painting in question. Might this painting prove to be a national treasure?
* Patty Cannon - Frederick, Maryland-- Could a Maryland family's home once have been the headquarters for the slave trade of Patty Cannon, coined "the most wicked woman in America? " Legend has it that she was a villainous woman who stole slaves and kidnapped free African- Americans to sell them back to plantation owners. Now the Detectives team investigates to see if they can prove once and for all that this is in fact the former home of Patty Cannon. Will they be able to draw long-sought- after conclusions or will the mystery remain?
* Trumpet - Philadelphia, Pennsylvania--Is a Philadelphia man's trumpet, which he bought at a local auction, somehow tied to the Revolutionary War? That is the mystery the Detectives solve this time around. Inscribed with the name "Captain Lewis," the trumpet appears to have been used by the aforementioned captain during the battles that won America's independence from England. Will the trumpet prove to be a valuable piece of American history?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Fri, Dec 8, 2017 -- 12:00 AM

Charles W. Morgan Whaling Ship, Witch's House, Jigsaw Puzzle (Episode #103Z)

KQED 9: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Morgan Whaling Ship - Might a whaling ship docked in Mystic, Connecticut, hold secrets to the Underground Railroad? That is the basis for the Detectives' investigation in this episode. The team speaks with the grandson of the last captain of the ship, known as The Morgan, in an effort to shed some light on the role of these kinds of ships during that period. Does The Morgan prove to be an integral part of the Underground Railroad?
* Witch's House - Could a house in Essex County, Massachusetts, have once belonged to an accused witch? The Detectives head to New England to research the likelihood with local historians and a descendant of the accused witch, Martha Carrier, who was executed by hanging in 1692 during the infamous Salem Witch Trials. Might the woman who was called the Queen of Hell have owned this home?
* 1909 Jigsaw Puzzle - Were women playing contact sports in the late part of the 19th century? That is the question asked by Bob and Hildegard Armstrong of Worcester, Massachusetts. A quirky jigsaw puzzle depicting women in the midst of a game of rugby or football has led to a History Detectives investigation, which begins with a visit to a jigsaw puzzle expert and continues with a sports historian, a magazine expert and finally to the Society for the Preservation of New England's Antiquities. Will the Armstrongs be able to put the pieces together once and for all?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Thu, Dec 7, 2017 -- 12:00 AM

Bonnie & Clyde, Al Ringling Theater, Sears Home (Episode #102Z)

KQED 9: Tue, Dec 5, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Bonnie & Clyde - Brodhead, Wisconsin--Could bullets owned by a woman in a small Wisconsin town be responsible for the demise of the notorious Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow? The Detectives travel to key cities throughout the country in an attempt to link the bullets to the murderous twosome. Along the way, they chat with various experts and run extensive ballistics tests. Are these really the bullets that ended one of the most infamous crime-sprees in American history?
* Al Ringling Theater - Baraboo, Wisconsin--Is it possible that a theater in the small town of Baraboo, Wisconsin, could have been the country's first great movie palace? The exquisite theater, which was designed in 1915 by Chicago architects C.W. and George Rapp, is a masterpiece designed in the style of the great French opera houses. The Detectives enlist the help of the Theatre Historical Society of America to solve the mystery of this grand edifice. Why was such an ornate theater erected in such an obscure location, and how has it stayed relevant throughout the years?
* Sears Home - Akron, Ohio--Might an Ohio couple's residence be a long- forgotten Sears home? The Detectives head to Akron, Ohio, to investigate whether or not Sears & Roebuck could have built the home in question at a time when communities were springing up almost overnight during the industrial boom. Does this couple live in a relic from years gone by?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Wed, Dec 6, 2017 -- 12:00 AM

Fire Station, Face Artifact, Pop Lloyd's Baseball (Episode #101Z)

KQED 9: Mon, Dec 4, 2017 -- 4:00 PM

* Fire Station - Morristown, New Jersey--Did President Ulysses S. Grant stop by a Morristown, New Jersey, firehouse on the Centennial of America? The Detectives are on the case to determine if and why such a visit might have occurred. By scouring old records and speaking to various experts, they hope to uncover the truth. Is the signature in the logbook authentic and if so, why was the Commander- in-Chief in town on such a historic date?
* Face Artifact - Mantoloking, New Jersey--Is it possible that a rock found along the beaches of the Jersey Shore could be an artifact left behind by Native Americans? The Detectives head to the home of Mrs. Betsy Colie, the woman who stumbled upon the treasure, in an attempt to unlock the secrets held inside this stone with an etched face. Is it really a link to an ancient civilization or just another pebble in the sand?
* Pop Lloyd's Baseball Field - Atlantic City, New Jersey-- Why was a baseball field in Atlantic City, New Jersey, named after an African- American ballplayer in a time of intense racial tension? The Detectives go to the park to unearth the explanation. John Henry "Pop" Lloyd was one of the greatest athletes of his time. A famed shortstop in the Negro Leagues throughout the first three decades of the 20th century, Pop was honored with a field in his name in 1949. What was the reasoning that led to this unlikely honor in a time of blatant prejudice and racial division?

Repeat Broadcasts:

  • KQED 9: Tue, Dec 5, 2017 -- 12:00 AM
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TV Technical Issues

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    TV ? Transmitter Status
    • 6/04/18: KQET Signal Loss

      KQET (DT25.1, 25.2 & 25.3) was unable to transmit from late Saturday 6/02 through early Monday 6/04 due to a break in the third party fiber feed somewhere between KQED?s Master Control room in San Francisco and the uplink reception point at California State University Monterey Bay. The break was found and fixed shortly after … Continue reading 6/04/18: KQET Signal Loss

    • DIRECTV KQED Plus 54 HD Issue

      We are experiencing a technical issue with DIRECTV which has affected our broadcast in High Definition.  We appreciate your patience, and for watching KQED Public Television!

    • KQED World Technical Issue

      UPDATE: The technical issue that we were experiencing has been resolved. KQED WORLD has now resumed regularly scheduled programming. Please find a discrepancy report below. 13:00-13:32 ET Secrets of the Dead #1602: Van Gogh?s Ear 13:32 ET: Regularly scheduled programming resumes ***Due to a technical issue, KQED WORLD will be airing evergreen programming (Secrets of … Continue reading KQED World Technical Issue

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9, KQET

KQED 9 / KQET

Channels 9.1, 54.2, 25.1
XFINITY 9 and HD 709
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQED, or as KQET in the 831 area code.
Outstanding PBS programming, KQED original productions, and more.

All HD programs

KQED Plus, KQET

KQED Plus / KQEH

Channels 54.1, 9.2, 25.2
XFINITY 10 and HD 710
Wave, DirecTV, Dish Network, AT&T U-verse: Channel # may vary, labeled as KQEH
KQED Plus, formerly KTEH.
Unique programs including the best British dramas, mysteries, and comedies.

PBS Kids

PBS Kids

Channel 54.4, 25.4, and 9.4
XFINITY 192 (Monterey/Salinas 372 and Sacramento/Fairfield 391)
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Quality children's programming. Live streaming 24/7 at pbskids.org.

KQED World

KQED World

Channel 9.3, 54.3 and 25.3
XFINITY 190 Monterey/Salinas 371 and Sacramento/Fairfield 390)
Wave: Channel # may vary.
Thought-provoking television — public affairs, local and world events, nature, history, and science.