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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, January 5, 2018

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, January 5, 2018
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Bannon Responds to Trumps Response A day after explosive book excerpts show President Trump's former chief strategist Steve Bannon trashing Trump and his family, the president continues to be dismissive of Bannon.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials The Fish That Ate Florida The lionfish, which recently spread from its natural territory in the Pacific to Atlantic waters, is aggressive, exotic and very, very hungry. Kent DePinto explores how lionfish went from being an aquarium favorite, to the scourge of an aquatic ecosystem as it eats everything in its path - with no natural predators in these seas to control it.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Hollywoods Boys Club The Golden Globes are Sunday. But in a year when the biggest story in Hollywood was sexual harassment, how will that play out in award season? Morning Edition looks at the future of Hollywood's boys club.
  • MORNING
  • 8:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Bay Area Restaurants Grapple With Sexual Harassment Allegations Just after Christmas, the San Francisco Chronicle published a bombshell story about the Bay Area food scene. Local chef and restaurateur Charlie Hallowell, the man behind Oaklands Penrose, Boot & Shoe Service and Pizzaiolo, was accused by 17 women of inappropriate touching and frequent sexual comments. Hallowell admitted to the Chronicle that his behavior at work was unfiltered and often completely inappropriate, and said he believed in this moment of reckoning for male bosses behaving badly. But Hallowell is only one of several prominent chefs accused of inappropriate behavior. Forum discusses sexual harassment in restaurants and kitchens, and the food worlds response.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Professor Susan Stryker Reveals 'Transgender History' The 1969 Stonewall riots in New York City created a watershed moment in the LGBT communitys struggle for civil rights. But few realize that transgender women instigated the uprising. In Transgender History, Susan Stryker reveals the lesser-known history of the transgender community in America, stretching back to the mid-20th century. Stryker is the director of the Institute for LGBT Studies at the University of Arizona, and joins Forum in the studio.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday SciFri Book Club Did you get a new smartwatch or smartphone for the holidays? Join Ira Flatow on the next Science Friday for tips for using VPNs, passwords and beefing up your digital security. And Mary Shelleys Frankenstein turned 200 this year. The SciFri Book Club is here to get you reading it.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Tinnitus and Hearing Are you one of millions of Americans who suffer from tinnitus? On the next Science Friday, a treatment that could put an end to the ringing in your ears. Plus what can AI tell us about the planet we call home? Harnessing artificial intelligence for environmental research.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Jordan Peele, and Remembering Roswell Rudd Hear Terrys March 2017 interview with writer and director Jordan Peele. He made his directing debut last year with the film Get Out. The film has been nominated for two Golden Globes; though the categories it's been nominated under have created controversy: best comedy film and comedy actor. Peele calls the film a social thriller. Its a horror film with racial anxiety at its center, and its about a young black man who goes to the wealthy suburbs with his white girlfriend to meet her parents. He starts to notice something going on with the other black people he meets there. The film got rave reviews from critics and was a hit with audiences. Peele is one half of the comedy team Key and Peele. Then, listen back to Terrys 2002 interview with jazz trombonist and composer Roswell Rudd. He died December 21st at the age of 82. Rudd was best known for his work with groundbreaking groups and musicians like Herbie Nichols, the New York Art Quartet, Cecil Taylor, Archie Shepp, and Carla Bley. He played traditional and avant-garde jazz for some 70 years. His final album was released last month with a new quartet, Embrace.
  • 2:00 pm
    World US Telemundo Actors Organize Actors in Miami work long hours to shoot Spanish-language telenovelas, mostly without overtime pay or benefits. But they're getting help - from a labor union - to get the same deal English language actors get.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Foreign Oil Funding Congress is trying to repeal a rule that would require oil companies to disclose payments to foreign governments. Marketplace looks at why the change is coming now and who it benefits.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report Coming Together, One Conversation at a Time 2017 was a year of tension, mistrust, people feeling divided. As we head into a New Year, the California Report Magazine has gathered some of their favorite stories about people coming together, despite their differences. First, journalist Lacy Jane Roberts, who lives in the Bay Area, has a conversation with here grandfather in Bozeman, Montana. Lacy, of course, is a reporter, and her grandpa doesnt believe the media can be trusted. Then, a lot of us are told not to talk politics at the dinner table. Especially if your guests fall on different sides of the political spectrum. But as Bianca Taylor found out, a new movement called Make America Dinner Again breaks this rule, in a big way. Plus, a mother and son reunite over music. For more than 40 years, The San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus has used its music to help create community and bridge divides. Last fall, they toured five southern states. The idea was to support local LGBTQ communities who may feel increasingly vulnerable in conservative areas. KQED Arts reporter Chloe Veltman caught up with one of the singers and his mom, who hadn't heard him perform since he was living as a little girl. And sometimes people from really different worlds come together...by chance. That's what happened to Paul Barnett - and his friend Armando Rivera. They met in the 1980's at a grocery store in the Central Valley. Armando is deaf, and he taught Paul how to sign. They've been friends ever since.
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report Coming Together, One Conversation at a Time 2017 was a year of tension, mistrust, people feeling divided. As we head into a New Year, the California Report Magazine has gathered some of their favorite stories about people coming together, despite their differences. First, journalist Lacy Jane Roberts, who lives in the Bay Area, has a conversation with here grandfather in Bozeman, Montana. Lacy, of course, is a reporter, and her grandpa doesnt believe the media can be trusted. Then, a lot of us are told not to talk politics at the dinner table. Especially if your guests fall on different sides of the political spectrum. But as Bianca Taylor found out, a new movement called Make America Dinner Again breaks this rule, in a big way. Plus, a mother and son reunite over music. For more than 40 years, The San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus has used its music to help create community and bridge divides. Last fall, they toured five southern states. The idea was to support local LGBTQ communities who may feel increasingly vulnerable in conservative areas. KQED Arts reporter Chloe Veltman caught up with one of the singers and his mom, who hadn't heard him perform since he was living as a little girl. And sometimes people from really different worlds come together...by chance. That's what happened to Paul Barnett - and his friend Armando Rivera. They met in the 1980's at a grocery store in the Central Valley. Armando is deaf, and he taught Paul how to sign. They've been friends ever since.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Jordan Peele, and Remembering Roswell Rudd Hear Terrys March 2017 interview with writer and director Jordan Peele. He made his directing debut last year with the film Get Out. The film has been nominated for two Golden Globes; though the categories it's been nominated under have created controversy: best comedy film and comedy actor. Peele calls the film a social thriller. Its a horror film with racial anxiety at its center, and its about a young black man who goes to the wealthy suburbs with his white girlfriend to meet her parents. He starts to notice something going on with the other black people he meets there. The film got rave reviews from critics and was a hit with audiences. Peele is one half of the comedy team Key and Peele. Then, listen back to Terrys 2002 interview with jazz trombonist and composer Roswell Rudd. He died December 21st at the age of 82. Rudd was best known for his work with groundbreaking groups and musicians like Herbie Nichols, the New York Art Quartet, Cecil Taylor, Archie Shepp, and Carla Bley. He played traditional and avant-garde jazz for some 70 years. His final album was released last month with a new quartet, Embrace.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Matthew Walker: Why We Sleep Sleep is one of the most important but least understood aspects of our lives. It affects our wellness and longevity, and yet questions about why we sleep and its purpose have only recently been answered. Neuroscientist and sleep expert Matt Walker provides a new understanding of sleep and how it affects our ability to learn, memorize and make logical decisions. Walker also answers a variety of questions about dreaming, sleep patterns, aging and disease prevention.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report Coming Together, One Conversation at a Time 2017 was a year of tension, mistrust, people feeling divided. As we head into a New Year, the California Report Magazine has gathered some of their favorite stories about people coming together, despite their differences. First, journalist Lacy Jane Roberts, who lives in the Bay Area, has a conversation with here grandfather in Bozeman, Montana. Lacy, of course, is a reporter, and her grandpa doesnt believe the media can be trusted. Then, a lot of us are told not to talk politics at the dinner table. Especially if your guests fall on different sides of the political spectrum. But as Bianca Taylor found out, a new movement called Make America Dinner Again breaks this rule, in a big way. Plus, a mother and son reunite over music. For more than 40 years, The San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus has used its music to help create community and bridge divides. Last fall, they toured five southern states. The idea was to support local LGBTQ communities who may feel increasingly vulnerable in conservative areas. KQED Arts reporter Chloe Veltman caught up with one of the singers and his mom, who hadn't heard him perform since he was living as a little girl. And sometimes people from really different worlds come together...by chance. That's what happened to Paul Barnett - and his friend Armando Rivera. They met in the 1980's at a grocery store in the Central Valley. Armando is deaf, and he taught Paul how to sign. They've been friends ever since.
  • 11:30 pm
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Mormons vs. Evangelicals Conservative Christians are often allied politically with conservative Mormons, especially around social issues, but major theological differences remain between evangelical Christianity and Mormonism.
Friday, January 5, 2018

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