Donate

Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, December 8, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, December 8, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered NPR, with the investigative news outlet ProPublica, has been reporting in recent months on the startling finding that women are more likely to die in childbirth in the United States than in any other developed country. Within that story is another: African American women are three times more likely to die from complications of childbirth than white women. Correspondent Renee Montagne reports that racism - and the stress it causes - can play a leading role in that disparity, across all income levels.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Life After Life In this documentary from the BBC, Elizabeth Davies travels the U.S. to meet some of those given life sentences as teenagers. How are they dealing with the prospect of freedom after believing they would spend their entire lives in prison? And how are those who've been released finding the outside world they have never experienced as adults?
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Jackson, Mississippi Grapples With Civil Rights History Mississippi was the site of many historic moments in the Civil Rights movement. It was where Emmett Till and Medgar Evers were murdered. And where the 19-day journey known as the March Against Fear ended. But Mississippi has rarely grappled with this part of history. A new civil rights museum in Jackson hopes to correct that. NPR tours the museum with the family of a civil rights martyr.
  • MORNING
  • 8:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum New S.F. Schools Chief Vincent Matthews on the Achievement Gap The San Francisco NAACP is calling on city officials to declare a state of emergency over the the achievement gap between black and white students. Seventy-four percent of African American students failed to meet 2016-17 state assessment standards in at least one subject area, according to the district. Well talk with new San Francisco Superintendent Vincent Matthews about efforts to address the achievement gap. Well also hear about his plans for the district, and a proposed double-digit salary raise for the citys teachers.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Al Franken and the #MeToo Revolution Minnesota Senator Al Frankens resignation announcement is just the latest fallout from the multitude of sexual misconduct allegations leveled against powerful men in recent months. Forum talks with a panel of feminists about what this moment means for women. Does the increasing recognition of widespread harassment signal a more enlightened age, or are we veering toward a destructive backlash?
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Best Science Books On Science Friday, stories of our national parks, WWII codebreaking and posthumous essays by Dr. Oliver Sachs. Its the best science books of 2017. Plus, a look at coastal restoration efforts in Louisiana -- from mangrove seed bombs to fighting off an invasion of the mealy bug.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Fires Fueled by Climate Change Fires are still raging across southern California. On Science Friday, a look at how climate change is drying up the state, fueling bigger blazes. And how the skittish narwhal responds to threats might seem contradictory -- its heartbeat slows down so it can hide. But what happens when you add humans to the mix? And a look at the microbiome of the space station.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Patrick Phillips Patrick Phillips wrote his first nonfiction book Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America about Forsyth County, Georgia. In 1912, after attacks on two white women, a lynch mob hanged one black man. And two black teens were hanged in a public execution after a one-day trial. Night riders then terrorized and drove out all the county's 1,100 black residents. It wasn't until the 1990s that the county was integrated again. Phillips grew up in the county and set out to uncover this untold piece of history. Phillips' collection of poetry Elegy for a Broken Machine was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Bonjour Not Hi Theres a controversy in French-speaking Montreal over how to say hello. Shopkeepers and waiters often go bilingual and say Bonjour-Hi. But some Quebec officials want to drop the English part.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Age And Advertising If you're an 18- to 34-year-old, you're part of a demographic that advertisers covet. But what happens on your 35th birthday? Do you still matter?
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report #UsToo --Your Stories About Sexual Assault This week, we're launching a new series...it's called Us Too. For a few weeks now, KQED's Silicon Valley Senior Editor Tonya Mosley has been conducting a survey, collecting stories of sexual harassment in California. Hundreds of people from all walks of life have shared detailed accounts of their experiences, at the workplace and elsewhere. Today, we hear from Sonia Lee, an elementary school teacher from Oakland, about an encounter she experienced early in her career.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered High Housing Costs Linked to Homelessness Homelessness in America is up for the first time in 7 years. And West Coast cities like Los Angeles are responsible for most of that increase. A booming economy means housing is more expensive and a lot of people simply can not afford it. One woman's story.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report #UsToo --Your Stories About Sexual Assault This week, we're launching a new series...it's called Us Too. For a few weeks now, KQED's Silicon Valley Senior Editor Tonya Mosley has been conducting a survey, collecting stories of sexual harassment in California. Hundreds of people from all walks of life have shared detailed accounts of their experiences, at the workplace and elsewhere. Today, we hear from Sonia Lee, an elementary school teacher from Oakland, about an encounter she experienced early in her career.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Patrick Phillips Patrick Phillips wrote his first nonfiction book Blood at the Root: A Racial Cleansing in America about Forsyth County, Georgia. In 1912, after attacks on two white women, a lynch mob hanged one black man. And two black teens were hanged in a public execution after a one-day trial. Night riders then terrorized and drove out all the county's 1,100 black residents. It wasn't until the 1990s that the county was integrated again. Phillips grew up in the county and set out to uncover this untold piece of history. Phillips' collection of poetry Elegy for a Broken Machine was a finalist for the National Book Award in Poetry.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Donna Brazile Veteran political strategist Donna Brazile shepherded the Democrats through one of the most turbulent general elections in history from bomb threats called in to Democratic headquarters to cyberattacks suspected to be orchestrated by Russian intelligence to a brutal personal Twitter feud with Donald Trump. Brazile is speaking out about her time as the leader of the Democratic Party. Join her for an unfiltered conversation about the 2016 election and the chaotic battlefield of American politics.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report #UsToo --Your Stories About Sexual Assault This week, we're launching a new series...it's called Us Too. For a few weeks now, KQED's Silicon Valley Senior Editor Tonya Mosley has been conducting a survey, collecting stories of sexual harassment in California. Hundreds of people from all walks of life have shared detailed accounts of their experiences, at the workplace and elsewhere. Today, we hear from Sonia Lee, an elementary school teacher from Oakland, about an encounter she experienced early in her career.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered High Housing Costs Linked to Homelessness Homelessness in America is up for the first time in 7 years. And West Coast cities like Los Angeles are responsible for most of that increase. A booming economy means housing is more expensive and a lot of people simply can not afford it. One woman's story.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The White House, Taxes and Jobs The U.S. job market has bounced back from a hurricane related slowdown this fall. But with unemployment hovering near 4 percent, a worker shortage could damper future economic growth.
Friday, December 8, 2017

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.

 

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.