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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Monday, December 4, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, December 4, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media Public Comment is Broken Federal agencies are required to provide a public comment period for any proposed regulatory changes, such as the FCC's current plan to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules. But this public comment period was unique, both because it garnered vastly more comments than every other comment period combined and because an overwhelming majority of those comments were automated either via electronic form letters or programmed bots. Add to that the discovery of stolen contact information, and the entire public comment process has been cast into question enough that the FCC has stated that it probably won't be heeding the comments, real or not. Brooke talks to Issie Lapowsky, senior writer for Wired, about her article "How Bots Broke the FCC's Public Comment System," and why she's concerned about what this portends for the future.
  • 1:00 am
    Latino USA A Light in The Dark When the going gets tough, people may tell you to look for a silver lining or to turn lemons into lemonade. But thats all easier said than done, right? On this episode, Latino USA has stories of people who ended up in dark places but somehow found the light. The show talks to fashion designer Mondo Guerra, from Project Runway, about how his most painful experience became the inspiration that launched his career. We also learn about Los Prisioneros, a punk band that fought a dictatorship in Chile, and we meet a young man who became a video game superstar while caring for his ailing mother.
  • 2:00 am
    Marketplace Weekend The Economics of Disaster When natural disaster strikes, recovery is expensive, and money flows. Plus, what it takes to bring power back to Puerto Rico. And the realities of life when the lights go out. Finally, how do you rebuild your life when your home and savings are destroyed? The economics of disaster. Next time on Marketplace Weekend.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Volvo Diplomacy When an American is detained in North Korea their lifeline is the Swedish Ambassador. How a deal for mining equipment and 1,000 Volvos led to a unique diplomatic role for Sweden in North Korea.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Political News Roundup Senator Mitch McConnell announced Friday that Republicans had enough votes to pass the party's tax overhaul even though GOP leaders are still hammering out parts of the bill. McConnell's announcement comes as former national security adviser Michael Flynn pled guilty to lying to the FBI. Forum brings you the latest in political news.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Haroon Moghul on Becoming a Professional Muslim After 9/11 In 2001, Haroon Moghul was a student at NYU and a founder of the university's Islamic Center. But after a crisis of faith he had plans to leave his leadership role. Instead, the 9/11 attacks thrust him into the spotlight as a spokesperson for American Muslims. Now, Moghul is out with a memoir titled "How to Be a Muslim: An American Story." Moghul joins us to talk about his struggles with bipolar disorder and the "burden" of being a "professional Muslim."
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Brunch Who doesn't like a good brunch? The authors of the new book Brunch is Hell.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments Tuesday in Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civil Rights Commission. While issues around free speech have garnered most of the attention, this case really has its roots in public accommodations law. We look back at the little discussed history of public accommodations laws, how they work and who enforces them.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Daniel Ellsberg Daniel Ellsberg is best known for leaking the classified Pentagon Papers in 1971. Back then, the former military analyst had other documents he also wanted to leak -- about our government's nuclear strategies and capabilities. Those documents have been released through the Freedom of Information Act, and Ellsberg has a new book titled The Doomsday Machine.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Women And the Garment Industry The tags inside our clothes read Mexico, Vietnam, Bangladesh. What they don't say is how the women - and they are mostly women - who made the clothes live. The World shares their stories.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Ordinary Businesses Taxes have dominated the news cycle of late, so what does an ordinary business owner have to say?
  • 4:30 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Ordinary Businesses Taxes have dominated the news cycle of late, so what does an ordinary business owner have to say?
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Daniel Ellsberg Daniel Ellsberg is best known for leaking the classified Pentagon Papers in 1971. Back then, the former military analyst had other documents he also wanted to leak -- about our government's nuclear strategies and capabilities. Those documents have been released through the Freedom of Information Act, and Ellsberg has a new book titled The Doomsday Machine.
  • 8:00 pm
    World Affairs Remarks by His Excellency Anatoly Antonov, Russian Ambassador to the US His Excellency Anatoly Antonov was recently appointed by President Putin to serve as the Russian Ambassador to the United States. A career diplomat, he has served for more than thirty years in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. In 2004, he was the Director of the Department for Security and Disarmament. Ambassador Antonov was formerly the Deputy Minister of Defense and, before his recent appointment, held the position of Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs. Ambassador Anatoly Antonov discusses the importance of diplomacy and Russias role in the world.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    1A with Joshua Johnson The Ground Beneath Our Feet During a major soil catastrophe - the Dust Bowl - President Franklin Roosevelt told state governors, "The nation that destroys its soil destroys itself." Still, we treat our soil like dirt. By growing food and storing carbon dioxide and water, the loam and peat that coats the earth sustains us all. In return, we till it, treat it with chemicals and generally walk all over it. Without healthy soil, food becomes less nutritious and crops become harder to grow. If the crops aren't healthy, then the 70 percent of the worlds fresh water that's used for agriculture will be wasted. A 2012 study found that about a third of the planet's topsoil is degraded and that without action, the world will be out of soil suitable for farming within 60 years. How did it get this way? "Simply put, we take too much from the soil and dont put enough back," University of Sydney professor John Crawford told Time. Enough of what? How can we do better by our dirt?
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Trump Shrinks National Monuments President Trump announced on Monday in Utah that his administration will dramatically shrink two national monument designations that protect federal public lands. Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke proposed shrinking both the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase-Escalante national monuments earlier this year.
Monday, December 4, 2017

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQEI Off The Air 11/4/2017

      The KQEI transmitter will be turned off Saturday morning (11/4). Utility work in the area requires de-energizing the lines for the safety of the workers. It is expected to be off for 5 hours.  Once the power returns, the broadcast will return to normal.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.

 

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.