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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Sunday, December 3, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, December 3, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    Radiolab When Brains Attack! In this episode, strange stories of brains that lead their owners astray, knock them off balance, and, sometimes, propel them to do amazing things. Hear from a kid whose voice was disguised from himself, relive a surreal day in the life of a young researcher hijacked by her own brain, and try to keep up with an ultra-athlete who, after suffering terrible seizures, gained extraordinary abilities by removing a chunk of her brain.
  • 1:00 am
    Freakonomics Radio What Are You Waiting For? This week on Freakonomics Radio: the surprising economics of waiting in line. Also: the incentives that make bounty hunters fifty percent more likely than police to get their man.
  • 2:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Harassment in The Lab Every day seems to turn up new revelations of sexual harassment. It's also happening to women in science. Many women have simply abandoned their scientific careers. Others waited years to file complaints until their own careers were launched. This hour we talk with several women who are fighting back. Also, the story behind one of the twentieth century's most famous scientific experiments: the women who did pioneering field studies of the great apes. We'll hear how Jane Goodall and Birute Galdikas revolutionized our understanding of primates. And playwright Laura Gunderson's project to reclaim the forgotten women of science.
  • 3:00 am
    To the Best of Our Knowledge Frankly, I Dont Give a Damn Have you ever wished you cared less or been told to develop a thicker skin? For the polite and anxious among us, suddenly being immune to criticism and embarrassment might seem to be a superpower. In this hour, were exploring what that power might allow you to do: become a fabulously successful stand-up comedian, discern what really matters in your life, and resist the attempts of self-help books to make you feel bad about living your life as you see fit.
  • 4:00 am
    Living On Earth The Tesla Truck Elon Musks pioneering electric car company Tesla has introduced its latest creation - an all-electric heavy-duty truck. The big rigs sleek design and promises of cost-savings have persuaded retailers like Walmart to pre-order the truck for their fleets. USA Today Tech Reporter Marco Della Cava attended the unveiling event and offers host Steve Curwood his take on the trucks place in the EV market, and the future of electric freight hauling.
  • 5:00 am
    Weekend Edition When Six Figures Isnt Enough Stephanie Culp talks candidly about money, and not having much. Now her family makes $100,000 a year, but they cant make ends meet. When six figures isnt enough, and the latest on the Republican tax plan. Sunday on Weekend Edition.
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 10:00 am
  • 11:00 am
    Radio Specials The Chris Thile Show: Spoon, Cecile McLorin Salvant, and Carmen Lynch This week the show is back live with the first of three December broadcasts from The Town Hall in New York, New York. Spoon joins them with sonically adventurous rock'n'roll from their new album Hot Thoughts; Ccile McLorin Salvant is on hand, fresh off her third Grammy nomination for Best Jazz Vocal Album; and comedian Carmen Lynch stops by with incisive observations from the darker side of life. Plus: a brand-new Song of the Week and a fresh crop of musician birthdays from host Chris Thile and the band -- singer Sarah Jarosz, pianist and music director Richard Dworsky, Mike Elizondo on bass, guitarist Julian Lage, drummer Ted Poor, and Gabe Witcher on fiddle; high camp and low humor from the programs acting company, Serena Brook, Tim Russell, and Fred Newman; and an Instant Song Request from you, the listener.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 1:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Tom Hanks One of the most respected actors and filmmakers of our time, Tom Hanks is an avid reader, and now a published author too. Uncommon Type, a collection of seventeen wonderful short stories all revolving around typewriters, features intelligent, heart-warming, and surprising characters and tales. Born in the San Francisco Bay Area, and the product of public education, Hanks is a staunch advocate for community colleges, crediting the two years he spent at Chabot College with enabling his future acting and writing career. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, Vanity Fair and The New Yorker. Uncommon Type is his first collection of fiction.
  • 2:00 pm
    On the Media Public Comment is Broken Federal agencies are required to provide a public comment period for any proposed regulatory changes, such as the FCC's current plan to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules. But this public comment period was unique, both because it garnered vastly more comments than every other comment period combined and because an overwhelming majority of those comments were automated either via electronic form letters or programmed bots. Add to that the discovery of stolen contact information, and the entire public comment process has been cast into question enough that the FCC has stated that it probably won't be heeding the comments, real or not. Brooke talks to Issie Lapowsky, senior writer for Wired, about her article "How Bots Broke the FCC's Public Comment System," and why she's concerned about what this portends for the future.
  • 3:00 pm
    TED Radio Hour Transparency Sometimes, being truthful can be uncomfortable even risky. But can radical honesty and openness change things for the better? TED speakers take transparency to its limit.
  • 4:00 pm
  • 5:00 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    Latino USA A Light in the Dark When the going gets tough, people may tell you to look for a silver lining or to turn lemons into lemonade. But thats all easier said than done, right? On this episode were bringing you stories of people who ended up in dark places but somehow found the light. We talk to fashion designer Mondo Guerra, from Project Runway, about how his most painful experience became the inspiration that launched his career. We also learn about Los Prisioneros, a punk band that fought a dictatorship in Chile, and we meet a young man who became a video game superstar while caring for his ailing mother.
  • 7:00 pm
    Radio Specials Planet Money: Your Cell Phones a Snitch In the winter of 2010, there was a robbery in Detroit. Two men rush into a Radio Shack on Jefferson Avenue carrying a handgun, and demand smartphones, enough smartphones to fill laundry bags. Then they flee. A few days later, they do it again at a T-Mobile store. Police try to gather every bit of evidence they can use to catch the robbers and make the case stick. By the time Timothy Carpenter is facing robbery charges, the FBI already has a trove of data on him. But should police be able to get that level of intimate data so easily? That's the question before The Supreme Court right now. The case could reach well beyond cell phone location records and affect what kind of privacy we can expect for all the footprints we leave behind in the digital age. Today on the show, the story of Tim Carpenter, his cell phone, and the court battle it sparked.
  • 7:30 pm
    Radio Specials How I Built This with Guy Raz: Jenn Hyman of Rent the Runway Guy Raz talks to Jenn Hyman the founder of Rent the Runway. Hyman got the idea for Rent the Runway in 2008, after she watched her sister overspend on a new dress rather than wear an old one to a party. Jenn and her business partner built a web site where women could rent designer dresses for a fraction of the retail price. As the company grew, they dealt with problems that many female entrepreneurs face, including patronizing investors and sexual harassment. Despite these challenges, Rent The Runway now rents dresses to nearly six million women and has an annual revenue of $100 million.
  • 8:00 pm
    Marketplace Weekend The Economics of Disaster When natural disaster strikes, recovery is expensive, and money flows. Plus, what it takes to bring power back to Puerto Rico. And the realities of life when the lights go out. Finally, how do you rebuild your life when your home and savings are destroyed? The economics of disaster. Next time on Marketplace Weekend.
  • 9:00 pm
    KQED Newsroom Steinle Verdict, Reza Aslan, Politics, and Hari Kondabolu After six days of deliberation a jury returned a not guilty verdict in the Kathryn Steinle murder trial. KQEDs Alex Emslie will break it all down. Then hear and interview with Reza Aslan, best-selling author, religious scholar and professor of creative writing at UC Riverside. Hell talk about his latest book, God: A Human History, which explores the evolution of the concept of God. Plus, political experts analyze the big stories of the week from North Korea missile testing, to the latest on the GOP tax plan and the ongoing revelations of sexual harassment allegations. Finally, comedian and writer Hari Kondabolus, new documentary The Problem with Apu challenges racial and ethnic stereotypes. While The Simpsons is his favorite TV show his least favorite character is Apu Nahasapeemapetilon, an Indian convenience store owner that uses stereotypes to generate laughs.
  • 9:30 pm
    Cambridge Forum Peter Seeger Tribute This tribute Sing Out concert celebrates Pete Seeger and the power of his songs with an all-star group of folk artists, including Sol y Canto, Catie Curtis, bluesman Guy Davis, Magpie, The Lonely Heartstring Band, Robbie OConnell and Fred Small.
  • 10:00 pm
    Truth, Politics, and Power with Neal Conan War Powers Can the President start a war on his own? How can a resolution passed by Congress four days after 9/11 provide legal cover for the war on ISIS, which didnt exist at the time? And what checks and balances restrict President Trumps authority to fire nuclear weapons at North Korea? Next time on Truth, Politics and Power.
  • 11:00 pm
    Tech Nation Da Vinci and Technology Moira speaks with Walter Isaacson about his latest book Leonardo Da Vinci. After all these centuries, more information emerges. And on Tech Nation Health, Chief Correspondent Dr. Daniel Kraft recaps the Exponential Medicine Conference 2017. And Dr. Ken Horne from Symic Bio talks about a common challenge: vein grafts in legs and arms.
  • 12:00 am
    On the Media Public Comment is Broken Federal agencies are required to provide a public comment period for any proposed regulatory changes, such as the FCC's current plan to repeal Obama-era net neutrality rules. But this public comment period was unique, both because it garnered vastly more comments than every other comment period combined and because an overwhelming majority of those comments were automated either via electronic form letters or programmed bots. Add to that the discovery of stolen contact information, and the entire public comment process has been cast into question enough that the FCC has stated that it probably won't be heeding the comments, real or not. Brooke talks to Issie Lapowsky, senior writer for Wired, about her article "How Bots Broke the FCC's Public Comment System," and why she's concerned about what this portends for the future.
Sunday, December 3, 2017

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQEI Off The Air 11/4/2017

      The KQEI transmitter will be turned off Saturday morning (11/4). Utility work in the area requires de-energizing the lines for the safety of the workers. It is expected to be off for 5 hours.  Once the power returns, the broadcast will return to normal.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.

 

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.