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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, November 14, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, November 14, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered McConnell on Roy Moore Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says Alabama GOP Senate candidate Roy Moore should step aside amid allegations of sexual misconduct with a minor decades ago. Republicans are also considering a write-in campaign for the Dec. 12 special election.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    World Affairs Fixing American Foreign Policy: A Conversation with Ambassador Samantha Power Less than a year into the new Trump administration, the US appears to be shifting away from key, longstanding foreign policies as well as from established allies. Is the US forging a new path, going it alone and leaving behind ongoing conflicts and unresolved humanitarian crises? At the one-year anniversary of Donald Trump's election, Samantha Power, former US ambassador to the United Nations and current professor of practice at Harvard Kennedy School and Harvard Law, joins World Affairs CEO Jane Wales for a discussion on the state of US Foreign Policy.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Birth of a Neo-Nazi From the outside, it seemed like Andrew Anglin had a comfortable, ordinary childhood. He grew up in an upper middle class neighborhood in Ohio. He liked comic books, and played computer games. In high school he had a girlfriend. He was a vegan. And he wore a sweatshirt emblazoned with a phrase condemning racism. So how did Anglin become the publisher of the world's largest Neo-Nazi Website, The Daily Stormer? Its a site known for nurturing an online community of angry, young men who plot anti-Semitic harassment campaigns and violent insurrection. Journalist Luke O'Brien spent months looking into Anglin's past, and uncovered a much darker story that might explain how a seemingly progressive kid from Ohio become a leading voice for the alt-right.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Tensions in Middle East Rise as Lebanese Prime Minister Still Missing in Saudi Arabia Tensions in the Middle East continue to mount as Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri remains in Saudi Arabia, sparking suspicion that he's being held against his will. Hariri disappeared into Saudi Arabia just as Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman orchestrated a purge of dozens of Saudi ministers and businessmen. At the same time, Saudi Arabia continues to blockade Yemen, after Yemeni rebels launched a missile attack on Riyadh. Meanwhile, the death toll continues to rise from an earthquake along the Iran-Iraq border Sunday night. In this hour, we discuss the latest developments in the Middle East.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Sasha Abramsky: Fear is Americas Most Dangerous Epidemic Jumping at Shadows is Sacramento-based journalist Sasha Abramsky's polemic against what he calls America's most dangerous epidemic: irrational fear. Abramsky portrays a political and cultural landscape that is, increasingly, defined by its worst fears and anxieties. And he examines how miscalculating risk impacts life, everything from the medicines we take to how we parent. Abramsky joins Forum to discuss his book and the political implications of fear.
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now Eric Garcetti Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti says he's not running for governor of California - many think that means he is running for president. Here & Now asks him about his ambitions.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Moore Misconduct Claims A fifth woman has come forward accusing Senate candidate Roy Moore of sexual misconduct, describing on Thursday a sexual assault when she was just 16 years old. We hear some of her testimony, and get the latest out of Alabama, where Alabama Public Radio News Director Pat Duggins tells us these last few days are revealing small, slow signs of political change in the state.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Mudbound Terry talks with Dee Rees, about her new movie Mudbound. Its about two families, one black, one white, both poor, in rural Mississippi, just before, during and after World War II. Rees also wrote and directed the film Pariah, which she says is based on what her life might have been like had she come out when she was 17, instead of in her 20s.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Cleaning Up the World A giant beach cleanup on the western coast of India. One man began the cleanup by himself, on hands and knees, pulling plastic bags and bottles out of the sand. Hundreds of people have now joined him. And many others are rethinking what one person can do for the environment.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Risks of Fracking The fracking revolution is about a decade old. Its had a significant impact on world oil markets, but the health risks associated with it havent been fully understood. Now new information may reveal what those risks actually are.
  • 4:30 pm
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace The Risks of Fracking The fracking revolution is about a decade old. Its had a significant impact on world oil markets, but the health risks associated with it havent been fully understood. Now new information may reveal what those risks actually are.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Mudbound Terry talks with Dee Rees, about her new movie Mudbound. Its about two families, one black, one white, both poor, in rural Mississippi, just before, during and after World War II. Rees also wrote and directed the film Pariah, which she says is based on what her life might have been like had she come out when she was 17, instead of in her 20s.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Alice Water and Robert Scheer Alice Waters is a chef, author, food activist, and the founder and owner of Chez Panisse Restaurant in Berkeley, California. She has promoted local sustainable agriculture for over four decades, and in 1995 she founded the Edible Schoolyard Project, which promotes free school lunches and sustainable food curriculum in public schools. She is a leader in the slow food movement, and was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Obama in 2015. She is the author of many books, including The Art of Simple Food I & II and The Edible Schoolyard: A Universal Idea. Her memoir is entitled Coming to My Senses. Robert Scheer is editor-in-chief of the online magazine Truthdig, for which he also writes a column that is syndicated in The Huffington Post and The Nation. Scheer, with help from Alice Waters, ran for the U.S. House of Representatives as one of the only anti-Vietnam war candidates in the country. As a journalist he has interviewed every president from Richard Nixon through Bill Clinton, and worked at the Los Angeles Times from 1976 until 2005. Scheers latest book, They Know Everything About You: How Data-Collecting Corporations and Snooping Government Agencies Are Destroying Democracy, was released in 2015.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    1A with Joshua Johnson We've Been Had: How Bunk Became Embedded In American Life Kevin Young is a writer, professor, poetry editor of the New Yorker and a historian of hoaxes. His latest book, "Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts and Fake News" takes a deep look at the mistruths and misdirection that have shaped our national identity. The book covers everything from spiritualism to Rachel Dolezal, from forged manuscripts to fake news. And with each bit of bunk, Young examines how both the fools and the foolers speak to a fundamental truth about our nation.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Roy Moore Supporters NPR's Elise Hu speaks with Rev. Mike Allison of the Madison Baptist Church about why he still supports Republican Senate candidate Roy Moore, following allegations of sexual contact with a 14-year-old and the assault of a 16-year-old.
Tuesday, November 14, 2017

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQEI Off The Air 11/4/2017

      The KQEI transmitter will be turned off Saturday morning (11/4). Utility work in the area requires de-energizing the lines for the safety of the workers. It is expected to be off for 5 hours.  Once the power returns, the broadcast will return to normal.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.

 

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