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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, July 18, 2017

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered High School Robot Competition and Defunding Teen Pregnancy Research An international high school robotics competition is happening in Washington, D.C., this week, and its the first one ever. More than 150 countries from six continents sent teams to compete. And NPR's Audie Cornish talks to Texas A&M professor Kelly Wilson about the Trump administration's moves to defund teen pregnancy research programs.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    World Affairs Stranger in Their Own Land: Living in Red America What drives voters to the election booth? UC Berkeley sociologist Dr. Arlie Hochschild embarked on a journey to the Deep South to explore this very question. What she found were lives damaged by lost jobs, poor wages and an elusive American dream. What role did emotion in politics play in the results of the 2016 election? What feelings motivate Trump supporters and Tea Partiers to support these movements? Dr. Hochschild will share her observations and the stories of those who have felt like strangers in their own land.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Progressive Rock, and Healthcare Progressive rock has a reputation for ruining rock music, but writer David Weigel <> is sticking up for it. He thinks the movement was more intellectual than the sound it was trying to replace, and he makes his case against the critics. Plus, Republicans continue weighing their options. What's their next move in the effort to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act?
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:43am, 8:43am & 11:29pm

  • MORNING
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Mosul Faces Major Challenges After Victory Declared Against ISISA week after Iraq declared victory in retaking Mosul from ISIS, the city is still reeling. Nearly 900,000 people have been displaced and the UN estimates it will cost more than a billion dollars to repair basic infrastructure. And theres still no political agreement between Iraqs two largest communities, Sunni and Shiite Arabs. Forum discusses Iraq's fight against ISIS and the future of Mosul.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum Oakland Failing to Investigate Buildings Flagged by Fire Department A four-alarm fire in Oakland last month displaced nearly 700 residents and came only about seven months after the deadly Ghost Ship fire. The East Bay Times reports that Oaklands Bureau of Fire Prevention followed up on only about a fifth of the 879 buildings flagged as unsafe since 2011. Forum talks with Pulitzer-Prize-winning reporter Thomas Peele about why so many Oakland buildings remain unchecked.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum The Psychology of Procrastination and Productivity Responding to email, preparing for that meeting, tidying up the kitchen. Why is it tasks like those are often put aside for things like watching tv and surfing the internet? Bay Area psychologist Mary Lamia joins us to discuss her new book, "What Motivates Getting Things Done: Procrastination, Emotions, Success."
  • 11:00 am
    Here & Now You Think Thats Punny? Joe Berkowitz used to cringe when friends dropped a particularly painful pun. Until he witnessed his first Pun-der-dome competition. Now he's a glutton for pun-ishment. Hear more, on Here & Now, from NPR and WBUR Boston.
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Made In America President Trump is rolling out Made In America week as a way to promote manufacturing on U.S. soil. Today on The Takeaway, a look at the changes in manufacturing over the last few decades and the challenges of making and buying American today.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air How Steven Bannon Helped Elect Donald Trump Journalist Joshua Green says Steve Bannon helped get Donald Trump elected by identifying and targeting disaffected young white men, mobilizing the anti-Clinton industry, and emphasizing anti-immigration positions. Terry Gross talks with Green about this and more in his new book, Devils Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump and the Storming of the Presidency.
  • 2:00 pm
    World An Iowa Town Bounces Back, Sort Of... Workers in Newton, Iowa used to make washing machines. Those jobs are gone, but the town has a new factory, making blades for windmills. Residents say they're glad to have the work, even though the new jobs dont pay nearly as well.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Jane Austens Industrial legacy On the 200th anniversary of writer Jane Austens death, Marketplace looks at the industry that has grown around her work in the last two centuries.
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Jane Austens Industrial legacy On the 200th anniversary of writer Jane Austens death, Marketplace looks at the industry that has grown around her work in the last two centuries.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air How Steven Bannon Helped Elect Donald Trump Journalist Joshua Green says Steve Bannon helped get Donald Trump elected by identifying and targeting disaffected young white men, mobilizing the anti-Clinton industry, and emphasizing anti-immigration positions. Terry Gross talks with Green about this and more in his new book, Devils Bargain: Steve Bannon, Donald Trump and the Storming of the Presidency.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Barbara Boxer In a political career spanning more than three decades, Senator Barbara Boxer has made her mark, combining compassionate advocacy with scrappiness. In 1976, she was elected to the Marin County Board of Supervisors, serving for six years. Boxer served ten years in the U.S. House of Representatives before being elected U.S. Senator. In her memoir, The Art of Tough, she shares her provocative and touching recollections of service, and cements her commitment to the protection of women, families, and the environment. As Senator, Boxer fought for her convictions, even when her positions conflicted with her party or the majority rule. Her controversial stances included opposition to the confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in 1991 and voting against the authorization of military force in Iraq in 2002. When her term expired at the end of 2016, Boxer announced that she will be dedicating her time to her Political Action Committee, PAC for Change.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
  • 11:00 pm
    1A with Joshua Johnson The Healthcare Hiatus In the words of one Senator, truth is confirmed by inspection & delay; falsehood by haste & uncertainty. So is this week's time-out good news or bad for those who want to pass the Senate's healthcare bill? The days ahead are being characterized as among the most important American social policy history. 1A asks why.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Health Care Now What? With the demise of Republican efforts to both repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, there's likely to be an impact on consumers and companies that depend on the health care law. Conservative media are reacting to the failure of the GOP's latest health care plan with outrage and disappointment.
Tuesday, July 18, 2017

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