Donate

Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Tuesday, August 20, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, August 20, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Renewed Interest in U.S. Stocks The program discusses how investors appear to once again be interested in the relative safety of U.S. stocks. A Bloomberg analysis shows investors pulling money out of emerging markets while simultaneously boosting purchases of U.S. equities.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    World Affairs America's Energy Opportunity Advances in existing technologies have brought America to a new level of energy production. However, as energy demands continue to grow, the debate over where this energy should come from intensifies, with some arguing in favor of fossil fuels and others championing renewable power. The program's guest is Michael Levi, senior fellow for energy and the environment and director of the Program on Energy Security and Climate Change at the Council on Foreign Relations. Levi argues that both options offer great opportunities for the U.S. to strengthen its economy, bolster its security and protect the environment.
  • 3:00 am
    Morning Edition Uniting the Birmingham Barons For years, Birmingham, Alabama had two minor league baseball teams -- the white Barons and the black Barons. They were separate teams for segregated audiences, and didn't unite until 1964. The program remembers the players, and the owner, who integrated the Birmingham Barons.
  • 5:00 am
    Morning Edition
    The California Report 5:50am, 6:50am & 8:50am

    KQED News 6am, 6:30am, 7am, 7:30am, 8am, 8:30am, 9am, 10am, 11am, 12pm, 1pm & 4:30pm


    Perspectives 6:06am, 7:35am & 11:30pm

  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Mubarak Acquitted Former Egyptian leader Hosni Mubarak could be released from prison this week, after he was acquitted Monday of corruption charges by a Cairo court. His release could cause even more political tension in a nation reeling from bloody protests after the army ousted President Morsi, Egypt's first freely elected president. Close to 1,000 people have been killed in the crackdown and clashes between Morsi supporters and security forces. We discuss the latest news out of Egypt.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum New Bill Would Give Teeth to Coastal Commission The California Coastal Commission has long lobbied for the power to fine anyone who violates laws protecting beach habitat and public access -- and this week they may just get it. Until now, the Commission has had to engage in costly and extended legal battles to penalize offenders. But California's Senate is voting on a bill to give them fining power later this week. The bill's backers argue that the Commission should have direct control over fining transgressors, but a coalition of businesses disagrees. The group says that its idea of violating the law differs from that of the Commission. We'll dig into how to best balance conservation, public access, and business interests on California's beaches.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum 'Stay, Illusion!': Re-reading Hamlet In their re-reading of Shakespeare's "Hamlet," philosophy professor Simon Critchley and psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster examine the play alongside writers and philosophers such as Lacan, Freud and Melville. The result: "Stay, Illusion!" is a cultural and psychological analysis of the famous play, which reminds us why it has endured. They join us in the studio.
  • 11:00 am
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    The Takeaway Republican National Committee Pulls Partnerships with CNN and NBC In the upcoming presidential elections, TV viewers may be seeing a lot less of the GOP candidates and the debates. That's because the Republican National Committee voted unanimously last Friday to pull their partnership with CNN and NBC, due to both networks' planned films focusing on Hillary Rodham Clinton.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air 'How Crime Went Online, and the Cops Followed' Guest host Dave Davies speaks with journalist Nate Anderson, author of the new book, "The Internet Police: How Crime Went Online, and the Cops Followed," about crime on the Internet and the response of law enforcement. Anderson also tells the story of Sea Land, a dilapidated former military fort built off the coast of the United Kingdom that was to be filled with computer servers and used to host websites free of government control.
  • 2:00 pm
    World The Politics of Facial Hair The new Iranian president's cabinet is made up entirely of bearded men. What can facial hair tell us about someone's politics?
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Bank Robbery Trends The program looks at trends in bank robberies. Have banks really deterred robberies with more sophisticated security measures?
  • 4:30 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Why The Guardian Destroyed Snowdens Hard Drives -- The program speaks with The Guardians editor-in-chief, Alan Rusbridger, who says he agreed to destroy hard drives containing information provided by National Security Agency leaker Edward Snowden to be able to continue to report on the materials rather than surrender them to the courts. He says the newspaper has digital copies outside of the U.K.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Marketplace Bank Robbery Trends The program looks at trends in bank robberies. Have banks really deterred robberies with more sophisticated security measures?
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air 'How Crime Went Online, and the Cops Followed' Guest host Dave Davies speaks with journalist Nate Anderson, author of the new book, "The Internet Police: How Crime Went Online, and the Cops Followed," about crime on the Internet and the response of law enforcement. Anderson also tells the story of Sea Land, a dilapidated former military fort built off the coast of the United Kingdom that was to be filled with computer servers and used to host websites free of government control.
  • 8:00 pm
    City Arts & Lectures Dave Eggers and Kevin Powers Kevin Powers joined the Army at the age of 17, later serving a year as a machine gunner in Mosul and Tal Afar, Iraq, in 2004 and 2005. After his honorable discharge he enrolled in Virginia Commonwealth University and later earned an M.F.A. from the University of Texas at Austin. His first novel, "The Yellow Birds," was nominated for a 2012 National Book Award. Called "brilliantly observed and deeply affecting" by The New York Times, the novel tells the story of a young soldier coming of age on the battlefield in Iraq. It is a story of loss of innocence, friendship, and the immeasurable cost of war. Powers appeared in conversation with author, McSweeney's founder and 826 Valencia co-founder Dave Eggers on January 16, 2013.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum 'Stay, Illusion!': Re-reading Hamlet In their re-reading of Shakespeare's "Hamlet," philosophy professor Simon Critchley and psychoanalyst Jamieson Webster examine the play alongside writers and philosophers such as Lacan, Freud and Melville. The result: "Stay, Illusion!" is a cultural and psychological analysis of the famous play, which reminds us why it has endured. They join us in the studio.
  • 11:00 pm
    All Things Considered Governor Rick Scott Continues to Fight Obamacare Florida Governor Rick Scott has built a political career fighting President Obama's healthcare overhaul, and as the law takes effect, he's not through yet. He's joining other Republicans in an attack of the "navigators," people being hired to help explain the law and enroll the public into health plans. Critics charge the navigators have too much access to personal information and may abuse consumer privacy.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered How to Turn Around a School District Alberto Carvalho runs the nation's fourth largest school district, Miami Dade Public Schools. Since he took over four years ago, the district's turnaround has been nothing short of "miraculous" -- or so his supporters say. During his tenure, the dropout rate has plummeted, the high school graduation rate has climbed to record levels and test scores for all students are way up. How did Carvalho do it?
Tuesday, August 20, 2013

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.

 

Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.