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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, June 21, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, June 21, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Protests in Brazil The protests that have erupted in Brazil are rooted in the vast economic and social inequalities in that South American nation. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro profiles one woman's struggle to get health care.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Panetta Lectures 2013 Middle East Turmoil: Chaos or Reform? -- Former CIA director Leon E. Panetta returns as moderator for the Panetta Institute's highly acclaimed lecture series, bringing national leaders, policy experts and journalists to the Monterey Peninsula. This episode's discussion features Ehud Barak, former Israeli prime minister and former minister of defense; Joe Lieberman, former United States senator; and Richard Lugar, former United States senator and former chairman of the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.
  • 3:00 am
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 7:00 am
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List Guest host Suzie Racho and The Chronicle's David Wiegand scout the Bay Area for things to do this coming weekend, and turn up a tribute to Harvey Milk, the Mother Hips and 60 years of City Lights.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Richmond Gang Rape Trial Underway Early this month, the trial began for two men charged with raping a teenage girl in Richmond. The 2009 gang rape left the girl beaten and unconscious after a homecoming dance, where a crowd of men reportedly participated or watched the rape, and none called the police. Two other men accepted plea deals for time in prison. We get an update on the trial.
  • 9:30 am
    Forum San Jose Sues Major League Baseball Over A's Move On Tuesday, the city of San Jose sued Major League Baseball in an effort to jump-start the Oakland Athletics' proposed move to San Jose. After nearly four years, the MLB has yet to vote on the relocation plan. San Jose city officials accuse the San Francisco Giants and MLB of blocking the move to avoid competition for the Giants. We discuss the lawsuit, and the politics of Bay Area baseball.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Growing up in '70s San Francisco, With an Openly Gay Dad When Alysia Abbott was two years old, her mother died in a car crash and her father, a poet and gay rights activist, moved her to San Francisco. Abbot's book "Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father" explores her experiences growing up with an openly gay parent during the tumultuous 1970s in San Francisco. It's a world of artists, activists, drag queens, drugs and eventually, AIDS.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Is America Losing the Innovation Race? They can simulate supernovas, or a nuclear bomb. They're supercomputers, and China is now number one. Host Ira Flatow and guests look at the future of innovation. Is America falling behind?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday E.O. Wilson's Message to Young Scientists Kids are natural scientists. So how do we keep them that way? Ira Flatow talks with biologist E.O. Wilson about his new book "Letters to a Young Scientist."
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Oliver Sacks on Hallucinations Neurologist Oliver Sacks joins the show to talk about hallucinations, and how they can be triggered by grief, trauma, brain injury, medications and neurological disorders. He'll also talk about his personal experimentation with hallucinogenic drugs in the 1960s. His book "Hallucinations" is coming out in paperback.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Immigrant Spouses Wait for DOMA Ruling With Baited Breath Same-sex couples across the U.S. are awaiting Supreme Court rulings on the Defense of Marriage Act and California's Proposition 8. The decisions will be critical to many immigrant spouses -- it could determine their future in America.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Evolution of Dunkin Donuts With free wi-fi and comfortable couches, Dunkin Donuts' redesign is starting to look a lot like Starbucks.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine A peculiar crime has been striking California cities with large Chinese-American populations. Scammers have been targeting elderly women and convincing them to give up thousands of dollars in cash, or face ghosts and imminent death.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Suicide in the Military -- The program concludes its series on suicide in the military. One of the biggest obstacles to getting help for suicidal troops may be the macho military culture that stigmatizes any admission of weakness. At Ft. Bliss, Texas, leaders are trying to change that culture. And the program shares of one combat vet -- the trauma he experienced in battle, how he tried to take his life, and how he eventually sought help.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine A peculiar crime has been striking California cities with large Chinese-American populations. Scammers have been targeting elderly women and convincing them to give up thousands of dollars in cash, or face ghosts and imminent death.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Oliver Sacks on Hallucinations Neurologist Oliver Sacks joins the show to talk about hallucinations, and how they can be triggered by grief, trauma, brain injury, medications and neurological disorders. He'll also talk about his personal experimentation with hallucinogenic drugs in the 1960s. His book "Hallucinations" is coming out in paperback.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Temple Grandin The number of children and adults diagnosed with autism has skyrocketed over the past 10 years, with a recent CDC report estimating that 1 out of 88 U.S. children are on the autism spectrum. Temple Grandin will share her own experiences and discuss how we can better understand and diagnose autism. From advances in neuroimaging to cutting-edge genetic research, what unique and revolutionary treatments might soon be available? Grandin is professor of animal science at Colorado State University and co-author of "The Autistic Brain: Thinking Across the Spectrum."
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Growing up in '70s San Francisco, With an Openly Gay Dad When Alysia Abbott was two years old, her mother died in a car crash and her father, a poet and gay rights activist, moved her to San Francisco. Abbot's book "Fairyland: A Memoir of My Father" explores her experiences growing up with an openly gay parent during the tumultuous 1970s in San Francisco. It's a world of artists, activists, drag queens, drugs and eventually, AIDS.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine A peculiar crime has been striking California cities with large Chinese-American populations. Scammers have been targeting elderly women and convincing them to give up thousands of dollars in cash, or face ghosts and imminent death.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered Presidential Voting Commission Meets The president's commission to address long lines at the polls and other voting problems will hold its first meeting in Washington, D.C. on June 21. The program discusses how it will have six months to come up with recommendations on how to fix the problems.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered NPR Reporter Turned Spy Novelist As an NPR reporter, Mary Louise Kelly covered the CIA and the intelligence beat, traveling around the world and interviewing some of the world's foremost spies. Now, she's used that experience in a new career as a spy novelist. Her thriller, "Anonymous Sources," has just been published. Mary Louise Kelly joins the program to explore how her experiences at NPR turned fact into fiction.
Friday, June 21, 2013

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Radio Specials

Every week, KQED airs some of the best programs from independent radio producers and public radio networks around the world.

Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQED-FM, Sat 5/06-Sun 5/07: shift to auxiliary antenna

      KQED-FM is likely to be operating on its auxiliary transmit antenna this Saturday and possibly Sunday as well. There will be workers redoing the tower light wiring on the tower that supports the KQED-FM main antenna. They have asked to begin work at 6AM and work the whole day on Saturday and finish on Sunday […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.