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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, May 3, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, May 3, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered On Guns, Senators Get an Earful Back Home Senators whose votes on the gun bill got attention back home have been getting an earful during the recess week, when many are back in their states. NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea talks about what that may mean for reviving the stalled bill.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials The Commonwealth Club: Climate One Borrowed Wheels -- Are car sharing and ride sharing finally going mainstream? As of 2013, car sharing has over 1 million participants in North America. The show convenes a panel to discuss the boom in car sharing, its various business models including Lyft and Sidecar, and the hurdles the burgeoning industry faces. Panelists include Rick Hutchinson, CEO of City Car Share; Sunil Paul, CEO of Sidecar, a San Francisco-based car sharing startup; Susan Shaheen, co-director of the Transportation Sustainability Research Center at UC Berkeley; and Kristin Sverchek, head of public policy and general counsel for Lyft and Zimride, two San Francisco-based car sharing startups.
  • 3:30 am
    Morning Edition 'Smoke and Pickles,' Where Asian and Southern Food Meet Chef Edward Lee had a popular Korean restaurant in New York. But he says it wasn't exactly what he wanted. So he sold it and moved to Louisville, Kentucky. His restaurants there combine Southern cooking and Asian flavors. Chef Lee talks about his new cookbook, "Smoke and Pickles".
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 7:00 am
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List This week we're talking about jazz, skateboards, and the Wheel of Life.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum Suicide on the Rise Among Baby Boomers More people currently die of suicide than in car accidents, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The suicide rate rose sharply among Americans between 35 and 64, jumping by about 50 percent for men in their 50s and women in their early 60s. Some experts suspect financial woes and abuse of painkillers may be contributing to the increase in suicides among Baby Boomers.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Spring Gardening Is the unseasonably warm weather wilting your wisteria? Sapping your strawberries? Taxing your tomatoes? Whether you're a seasoned grower with a huge backyard, or you're taking a first crack at a window box of herbs, our panel of gardening and landscaping experts will advise, share stories and cheer you on.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday 17-Year Cicadas Return Cicadas are coming back -- millions of 17-year cicadas are primed to crawl out of the ground this spring. Ira Flatow gets an update on the latest sightings. Also, how do you measure the mass of antimatter?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Michael Pollan A few years back Michael Pollan told us, "Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants." Now, he's telling us how to cook it. Ira Flatow talks with Pollan about his new book, "Cooked." Also, can we elevate cities to save them from the next Superstorm Sandy?
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air Actor Bradley Cooper Terry Gross talks with actor Bradley Cooper. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in the film "Silver Linings Playbook." Cooper's role in the film "The Hangover" helped make him a star. Currently, he's starring in the drama "The Place Beyond the Pines."
  • 2:00 pm
    World Chinese Push for Balance in Government The Communist Party in China is used to ruling without any checks and balances. But the Chinese government is getting increasing pressure to change from its own people. The show features some of their voices.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace Prom at the Oyler School Prom is one of the most important events at any high school. On the next installment of its series focusing on The Oyler School in Cincinnati, the show finds out why the dance is especially meaningful there.
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine The immigration reform debate is bringing more attention than ever to the people coming to the U.S. to live and work. Even while working in essential industries, many immigrants live somewhat invisible lives. That's certainly true for the 15,000 or more farmworkers - some documented, some not -- in the Eastern Coachella Valley, a rich agricultural region east of Palm Springs. Many live in mobile home parks there, one of which has been without power since January. We pay them a visit to learn about the challenges of affordable housing in the region, and what the future may hold.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Calif. Prison Update -- NPR's Richard Gonzales brings us up-to-date on California's effort to bring its prison population down as ordered by the U.S. Supreme Court. California Gov. Jerry Brown has submitted a new plan to further reduce the number of inmates. But he's still striking a defiant tone toward the courts -- saying he's done enough to address overcrowding concerns.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine The immigration reform debate is bringing more attention than ever to the people coming to the U.S. to live and work. Even while working in essential industries, many immigrants live somewhat invisible lives. That's certainly true for the 15,000 or more farmworkers - some documented, some not -- in the Eastern Coachella Valley, a rich agricultural region east of Palm Springs. Many live in mobile home parks there, one of which has been without power since January. We pay them a visit to learn about the challenges of affordable housing in the region, and what the future may hold.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air Actor Bradley Cooper Terry Gross talks with actor Bradley Cooper. He was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor for his role in the film "Silver Linings Playbook." Cooper's role in the film "The Hangover" helped make him a star. Currently, he's starring in the drama "The Place Beyond the Pines."
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club Deborah Tannen The program's guest is Deborah Tannen, author of "You Just Don't Understand: Women and Men in Conversation," which was on the New York Times bestseller list for nearly four years. Specializing in explaining how conversational style can make or break relationships, she has examined conversations between men and women, mothers and daughters, co-workers, lovers and siblings. Tannen is a professor at Georgetown University and has authored many scholarly books and articles as well as plays, poems, short stories and personal essays.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Suicide on the Rise Among Baby Boomers More people currently die of suicide than in car accidents, according to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The suicide rate rose sharply among Americans between 35 and 64, jumping by about 50 percent for men in their 50s and women in their early 60s. Some experts suspect financial woes and abuse of painkillers may be contributing to the increase in suicides among Baby Boomers.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine The immigration reform debate is bringing more attention than ever to the people coming to the U.S. to live and work. Even while working in essential industries, many immigrants live somewhat invisible lives. That's certainly true for the 15,000 or more farmworkers - some documented, some not -- in the Eastern Coachella Valley, a rich agricultural region east of Palm Springs. Many live in mobile home parks there, one of which has been without power since January. We pay them a visit to learn about the challenges of affordable housing in the region, and what the future may hold.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered Civil Rights Cold Case John Queen was an inconsequential man. In segregated Mississippi in 1965, he was black, 65-year-old, a paraplegic who crawled the streets of Fayette on his hands. When he cursed in front of a white constable, Queen was shot and killed. The constable was quickly cleared. But the shooting would leave black residents quietly angry and help spur an end to the town's strict segregation. From NPR's Investigative Unit, Joseph Shapiro reports.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Marine Helps Boston Victims Through Amputations More than a dozen people lost limbs in the Boston Marathon bombing. They've been visited in the hospital by politicians and actors and sports stars. But other visitors who stood by their beds were able to tell them how their lives will change: Marines who lost legs fighting the Taliban in Afghanistan. NPR's Tom Bowman met one of them nearly two years ago. Cam West is a Marine who NPR profiled shortly after he lost a leg in Afghanistan. Now we meet him again, to learn how he came to help the victims of the bombing in Boston.
Friday, May 3, 2013

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Radio Specials

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQED-FM, Sat 5/06-Sun 5/07: shift to auxiliary antenna

      KQED-FM is likely to be operating on its auxiliary transmit antenna this Saturday and possibly Sunday as well. There will be workers redoing the tower light wiring on the tower that supports the KQED-FM main antenna. They have asked to begin work at 6AM and work the whole day on Saturday and finish on Sunday […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.