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Radio Daily Schedule

KQED Public Radio: Friday, March 8, 2013

88.5 FM San Francisco •  89.3 FM Sacramento

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Friday, March 8, 2013
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered The History of the Filibuster On Wednesday, Sen. Rand Paul launched into a filibuster on the floor of the Senate, against John Brennan's nomination as CIA director. Paul, who said "I will speak until I can no longer speak," lasted for nearly 13 hours. It was an impressive length of time, but it didn't come close to Sen. Strom Thurmond's record-holding filibuster against the Civil Rights Act of 1957, which surpassed 24 hours. Melissa Block speaks with Senate historian Donald Ritchie about the colorful history of the talking filibuster.
  • 1:00 am
  • 2:00 am
    Radio Specials Hearing Voices Her Stories: For Women's History Month -- Hot Dmae Roberts presents various stories, including The Kitchen Sisters' trip to Tupperware parties. Also, a supermarket checker checks out her life, Jenifir returns "Home From Africa" with all 13 Symptoms of Chronic Peace Corps Withdrawal; and Sonia Sanchez, Tracie Morris, Jill Battson and Meryn Cadell perform short poems.
  • 3:30 am
    Morning Edition The World's Oldest Bill of Rights The world's oldest bill of rights is not from Greece or Rome, but ancient Persia. King Cyrus declared freedom of religion and other rights for his citizens, and inscribed them on a clay cylinder. The show reports on this artifact celebrating human rights in ancient Iran, which is now visiting the U.S.
  • 5:00 am
  • MORNING
  • 6:33 am
    The Do List Host Cy Musiker and San Francisco Chronicle Executive Datebook editor David Wiegand look ahead at the hottest tickets and most spectacular shows this coming week in Northern California.
  • 7:00 am
  • 8:33 am
    The Do List The Do List This week we're asking what happened on a fateful last night, and we're living in pony time.
  • 9:00 am
    Forum How Would Funding Changes Affect Calif. Schools? Governor Jerry Brown wants to dramatically restructure the way California allocates funding to schools by providing extra funds to districts with large numbers of needy students. But critics say the formula benefits mostly urban areas to the detriment of more affluent suburban districts. We'll discuss the plan and check in with some Bay Area school districts to get their response.
  • 10:00 am
    Forum Civil Rights Leaders Remember the March on Washington In August 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. stood before thousands of people in front of the Lincoln Memorial and delivered those historic words, "I Have a Dream." Almost 50 years later, that iconic speech still resonates. We remember the March on Washington and talk to those who worked alongside Dr. King -- including one who helped pen that famous "I Have a Dream" speech -- about Dr. King's legacy and where the civil rights movement stands today.
  • 11:00 am
    Science Friday Red Wine and Longevity Is red wine the antidote to aging? Host Ira Flatow and guests look at how researchers are trying to tap into the fountain of youth. The show also gets a glimpse into the secret lives of bees. Did you know they get a buzz from caffeine?
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Science Friday Fighting 'Nightmare' Bacteria New drug-resistant superbugs lurking in hospitals have been dubbed "nightmare bacteria." Can we stop them? Host Ira Flatow and guests look at some creative ways to outsmart these bugs, thinking beyond the antibiotic.
  • 1:00 pm
    Fresh Air A History of the FBI's 'Enemies' List Terry Gross talks with New York Times reporter Tim Weiner about the history of the FBI's secret intelligence-gathering operations, based on 70,000 recently declassified documents. Weiner's new book "Enemies: A History of the FBI" is now out in paperback. Much of the book is about J. Edgar Hoover's secret intelligence operations against U.S. citizens he suspected were anarchists, communists, radical leftists or homosexuals.
  • 2:00 pm
    World Sarita's Story Were it not for her skirt, 12-year-old Sarita could be taken for a boy. She cuts her hair short. She plays rough-and-tumble sports. Her parents are raising her to be ambitious and outspoken. And in a traditional farm village, there may be no place for her.
  • 3:00 pm
  • 4:00 pm
    Marketplace The Employment Data Disconnect Labor department data show that the average time a person is unemployed is currently shrinking -- but the jobs numbers coming out Friday are expected to show little change in the unemployment rate. So why don't the numbers add up?
  • 4:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine While Congress prepares to debate the so-called "path to citizenship" for undocumented immigrants, 8.5 million legal permanent residents are in the U.S. and eligible to naturalize. Nearly one-third of them live in California -- but they're not all becoming citizens. Language is a big obstacle. The federal government has launched its first-ever national campaign in Vietnamese and other languages, to get out the word about the naturalization process. We stop by a recent kick-off event in Orange County.
  • 5:00 pm
    All Things Considered
    KQED News 4:30pm, 5:04pm, 5:30pm, 6:04pm & 7:04pm


    Does Immigration Make Cities Safer? -- Is there a link between immigration and higher crime rates? Politicians from Pennsylvania to Arizona claim there is, and many have passed tough anti-immigration laws as a result. But social scientists say first-generation immigrants actually make their communities safer. They point to big, high-immigration cities in New York, Texas and California, which have some of the lowest crime rates in the country.
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine While Congress prepares to debate the so-called "path to citizenship" for undocumented immigrants, 8.5 million legal permanent residents are in the U.S. and eligible to naturalize. Nearly one-third of them live in California -- but they're not all becoming citizens. Language is a big obstacle. The federal government has launched its first-ever national campaign in Vietnamese and other languages, to get out the word about the naturalization process. We stop by a recent kick-off event in Orange County.
  • 7:00 pm
    Fresh Air A History of the FBI's 'Enemies' List Terry Gross talks with New York Times reporter Tim Weiner about the history of the FBI's secret intelligence-gathering operations, based on 70,000 recently declassified documents. Weiner's new book "Enemies: A History of the FBI" is now out in paperback. Much of the book is about J. Edgar Hoover's secret intelligence operations against U.S. citizens he suspected were anarchists, communists, radical leftists or homosexuals.
  • 8:00 pm
    Commonwealth Club When Harry Met Sal: Rob Reiner on Marriage Equality From his starring role as Meathead on the popular 1970s sitcom "All in the Family" to his blockbuster films "The Princess Bride," "When Harry Met Sally" and "A Few Good Men," Reiner has been entertaining audiences for decades with his singular humor and artistic vision. As a director, he's worked with actors Jack Nicholson, Tom Cruise and Kathy Bates, as well as celebrated writers Nora Ephron and Aaron Sorkin. The son of comedic genius Carl Reiner, he grew up in a political family where civil rights were a frequent topic around the kitchen table. A Hollywood legend and political activist, Reiner joins the show to talk politics. In light of the Supreme Court's recent decision to hear challenges to both Proposition 8 and DOMA, Reiner will discuss his views on the future of marriage equality, his involvement in other political causes and his contributions to the entertainment industry.
  • 9:00 pm
  • 10:00 pm
    Forum Civil Rights Leaders Remember the March on Washington In August 1963, Martin Luther King, Jr. stood before thousands of people in front of the Lincoln Memorial and delivered those historic words, "I Have a Dream." Almost 50 years later, that iconic speech still resonates. We remember the March on Washington and talk to those who worked alongside Dr. King -- including one who helped pen that famous "I Have a Dream" speech -- about Dr. King's legacy and where the civil rights movement stands today.
  • 11:00 pm
    The California Report The California Report Magazine While Congress prepares to debate the so-called "path to citizenship" for undocumented immigrants, 8.5 million legal permanent residents are in the U.S. and eligible to naturalize. Nearly one-third of them live in California -- but they're not all becoming citizens. Language is a big obstacle. The federal government has launched its first-ever national campaign in Vietnamese and other languages, to get out the word about the naturalization process. We stop by a recent kick-off event in Orange County.
  • 11:30 pm
    All Things Considered Egyptian Police on Strike There is a growing strike by police officers in Egypt. Long accused of brutality before and after the fall of the Mubarak regime, police commanders say they are ill-equipped to handle the ongoing protests, many of them violent, in Port Said and other cities. They are demanding the ouster of the new interior minister, appointed by President Mohammed Morsi. The strike comes amid fears of more violence on Saturday when a court in Cairo is scheduled to hand down a second group of verdicts and sentences in connection with a soccer riot that left 70 dead last year.
  • 12:00 am
    All Things Considered Taking Back the Word 'Jihad' Ads showing American Muslims describing their personal struggles have appeared in recent months on city buses and subways in San Francisco, Chicago and Washington, D.C. The "MyJihad" campaign was started in Chicago, and its goal is to reclaim the term "jihad" from violent extremists. It's quickly turning into a nationwide grassroots effort, striking a chord with young Muslims who are launching impromptu "MyJihad" events and campaigns in cities across the nation. It's also attracting funds to campaign sponsor CAIR-Chicago and fueling the ire of some vocally anti-Muslim watchdog groups.
Friday, March 8, 2013

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Radio Technical Issues

Radio Technical Issues

As we become aware of technical problems originating from KQED Radio, we will list them here.

 

    Radio
    • KQEI Off The Air 11/4/2017

      The KQEI transmitter will be turned off Saturday morning (11/4). Utility work in the area requires de-energizing the lines for the safety of the workers. It is expected to be off for 5 hours.  Once the power returns, the broadcast will return to normal.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our Radio Technical Issues page.

 

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