Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, August 31, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, August 31, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#219] Come Hell or High Water: The Battle for Turkey Creek This program follows the painful but inspiring journey of Derrick Evans, a Boston teacher who moves home to coastal Mississippi when the graves of his ancestors are bulldozed to make way for the sprawling city of Gulfport. Over the course of a decade, Derrick and his neighbors stand up to powerful corporate interests and politicians and face ordeals that include Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil disaster in their struggle for self-determination and environmental justice. duration 1:23:27   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    New Environmentalists [#2013] From Chicago to Karoo The latest installment of the Emmy award winning series features portraits of 6 passionate and dedicated activists. They are true environmental heroes who have placed themselves squarely in harm's way to battle intimidating adversaries, while often creating partnerships with unlikely allies. The New Environmentalists share a common goal, safeguarding the Earth's natural resources from exploitation and pollution, while fighting for environmental justice in their communities. duration 29:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#303] New Teacher Survival Guide We'll follow several new teachers and their mentors as they focus on essential first-year skills from lesson planning to classroom management to differentiation. This hour is filled with useful "do's and don'ts" for new teachers. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#334H] Stiglitz On Tax Reform to Save The Middle Class In an encore presentation, Nobel Laureate economist Joseph E. Stiglitz says he's infuriated by America's growing inequality and at how the tax code has been manipulated and abused to place the burden on the earners of ordinary income - instead of the rich and powerful most able to pay. "We already have a system that isn't working," he tells Bill Moyers. "That has contributed to making America the most unequal society of the advanced countries."
    But he has a solution. Joseph Stiglitz recently published a call to action, a 27-page report for the Roosevelt Institute on how to reform our tax system and rebuild our country. "We can have a tax system that can help create a fairer society," he says. "Only ask the people at the top to pay their fair share. It's not asking a lot. It's just saying the top 1% shouldn't be paying a lower tax rate than somebody much further down the scale - [they] shouldn't have the opportunity to move money offshore."
    Stiglitz believes that taxes can be used as incentives: "If your taxes say we want to encourage real investments in America, then you get real investment in America. But I also believe that you have to shape incentives and that markets on their own don't necessarily shape them the right way."
    Now a professor at Columbia University, Joseph E. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Clinton White House, as chief economist of the World Bank and is currently president of the International Economic Association. He is a best-selling author with a worldwide following that includes presidents and prime ministers.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia This Week [#422] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5408H] * The crisis in Ukraine and the threat of Islamic State militants (ISIL) are just two of the foreign policy challenges President Obama and his national security team are facing this week.
    The conflict in Ukraine has intensified as Russian troops have brazenly moved inside Ukrainian territory. NATO released satellite images it says show as many as 1000 Russian armed forces entering southeastern Ukraine, a claim Russia denies. The escalation comes just days after Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko met to discuss ways to end the conflict.
    Rooting out Islamic State extremists in Syria and Iraq is proving more challenging for the Obama administration. During a news conference on Thursday, President Obama said the US was considering a range of options to confront and destroy ISIL militants but added that the US did not have a strategy yet.
    Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics and Hannah Allam of McClatchy Newspapers will have analysis of the evolving US strategy in dealing with ISIL and the new challenges the Russia-Ukraine standoff has created.
    * Plans by restaurant giant Burger King to purchase Canadian coffee-and-doughnut chain Tim Hortons and relocating its corporate headquarters north of the border has added fire to the controversy over a growing trend of US companies relocating abroad. Greg Ip of The Economist will explain why the dysfunctional corporate-tax system in American may be to blame.
    * Plus, Dan Balz of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the dominant issues for voters leading into the midterm elections from raising the minimum wage to global instability and immigration reform. And be sure to read Gwen's Take on why voting for the candidate you dislike the least, may not be the best strategy in the voting booth this fall.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3236H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#207] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3235] Deadly Danger: Looming Tsunami In Norwa Norway: Deadly Danger - More often than not, people associate tsunamis with Japan. But people living around Geirangerfjord in Norway are well aware of their own vulnerability to a huge tidal wave. Mount ?kernes threatens to crash into the fjord, with incalculable consequences. Geologists are measuring and monitoring the steep mountain's movements, and are sure the tsunami that would result from a major landslide would inundate the surrounding villages. Scientists say an 80-meter tidal wave following a collapse would sweep everything into the narrow arm of the sea. 4,000 villagers are at risk. Some have already moved to higher elevations. Others continue to live down near the water, despite the threat of a natural disaster. The area has already experienced two such disasters. In 1905 and 1934, dozens of people lost their lives. Romania: Fearless Shepherds - Their lives are poor, archaic and not without danger. Shepherds in Romania have to be on constant alert for wolves and brown bears that attack their herds. Some 5,000 to 6,000 bears roam the forests of the Carpathian Mountains. There are especially large numbers of them in summer. Then thousands of shepherds with their sheep dogs trek through the mountains and valleys of the Carpathians. Usually just a wooden box serves as summer accommodation. The dwelling stands in the middle of the area where they feed their flocks. That makes its easier for the shepherds to keep an eye on their animals and protect them. Bears and wolves aren't the only danger for the shepherds, however. Germany: Resolute Refugees - Countless refugee dramas have taken place off the coast of Lampedusa. Year after year, tens of thousands of people fleeing Africa end up on the Italian island. But hardly any of them want to stay in Italy. One group has managed to get as far as Berlin. In recent history the Berlin district of Kreuzberg has enjoyed a reputation for being unconventional and nonconformist. For several months now it's also been accommodating several dozen refugees from Morocco, Senegal, Sudan and other African countries. The immigrants Africa haven't found a permanent home there, however. They are living in a disused school, tolerated by the authorities, eyed warily by residents, beset by the police. As most are threatened with expulsion, some took refuge on the roof of the school. Britain: Historical Trauma - A hundred years after World War One, Britain is remembering not only the 17 million victims who lost their lives on all fronts and sides, but also the many men who returned home from the battlefields of Europe with psychological scars. Some of the former soldiers suffered from a hitherto unknown disorder: shell shock. Sergeant Bernard Brookes, a signaler, wrote a diary describing the appalling conditions in the trenches and his difficulties after being invalided out of active service with the condition. He wrote extensively about how society treated the traumatized returning soldiers. His letters and diary were published in book form early last year. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#219] Come Hell or High Water: The Battle for Turkey Creek This program follows the painful but inspiring journey of Derrick Evans, a Boston teacher who moves home to coastal Mississippi when the graves of his ancestors are bulldozed to make way for the sprawling city of Gulfport. Over the course of a decade, Derrick and his neighbors stand up to powerful corporate interests and politicians and face ordeals that include Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil disaster in their struggle for self-determination and environmental justice. duration 1:23:27   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    QUEST [#604H] The Physics of Biking/Whale Shark Investigate the forces that allow humans to balance on a bicycle with researchers from Davis, California who are trying to understand the physics of riding a bike. And, meet Bay Area researchers working to protect frogs across the state and across the world. Plus, explore whale sharks with Kip Evans, a wildlife filmmaker from Pacific Grove, California. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 am
    State of Surveillance A Co-production of KQED & The Center for Investigative Reporting "State of Surveillance" goes inside California police departments where new technologies ranging from automated license plate readers to facial recognition technology are making it easier to fight crime, but are also raising concerns about privacy. Are these monitoring systems becoming dragnets filled with information about law-abiding citizens? duration 27:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1110] Risky Bonds Great bond investor Kathleen Gaffney says it's been the quietest summer bond market in her 20 plus years of managing fixed income funds. Is this the proverbial calm before the storm? Have years of low interest rates lulled investors into another false sense of security? Gaffney, Portfolio Manager of the Eaton Vance Bond Fund, is concerned about risks in the bond world and has adjusted her portfolios accordingly. She'll explain why she thinks bonds are fraught with risk and why stocks and cash are now a big part of her portfolios. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#326H] Financial Planner Ric Edelman tells us how we can improve our credit score. Plus, if you're just starting out professionally how can you stand out from the college graduate crowd? And Jean Edelman gives her insights on finding the perfect job. All that and more on this edition of The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    This American Land [#405] Fish Lifts for River Herring, Biofuel Start-ups, Fabulous Fungi, Prickly Pear Cactus for Clean Water Every spring, on the Saugatucket River in Rhode Island, tens of thousands of river herring try to swim upriver from the Atlantic to spawn, facing dams on the river that block their way. Many fish find it too exhausting to use fish ladders on the dams, and they give up their struggle. But happily there are people who volunteer to help the fish on their journey, using buckets in an effort called a "fish lift" to get the herring over the dams. We look at the new frontier in renewable sources of energy - sources grown as agricultural crops. New biofuel enterprises based on switchgrass, corn stover and wood waste are still in the start-up stage, trying to develop their technologies, scale up their production, and secure a market for their ethanol product with some controversial government support. Living on the San Juan Islands off the coast of Washington State means being conscious about protecting the land, water, and wildlife High school students on Orca Island are keeping their water clean with some help from Mother Nature. Our Science Nation report takes us to a lab where researchers are testing a Mexican folk recipe: using the "goo" inside prickly pear cactus to purify water contaminated by chemicals or oil spills. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3236H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5408H] * The crisis in Ukraine and the threat of Islamic State militants (ISIL) are just two of the foreign policy challenges President Obama and his national security team are facing this week.
    The conflict in Ukraine has intensified as Russian troops have brazenly moved inside Ukrainian territory. NATO released satellite images it says show as many as 1000 Russian armed forces entering southeastern Ukraine, a claim Russia denies. The escalation comes just days after Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko met to discuss ways to end the conflict.
    Rooting out Islamic State extremists in Syria and Iraq is proving more challenging for the Obama administration. During a news conference on Thursday, President Obama said the US was considering a range of options to confront and destroy ISIL militants but added that the US did not have a strategy yet.
    Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics and Hannah Allam of McClatchy Newspapers will have analysis of the evolving US strategy in dealing with ISIL and the new challenges the Russia-Ukraine standoff has created.
    * Plans by restaurant giant Burger King to purchase Canadian coffee-and-doughnut chain Tim Hortons and relocating its corporate headquarters north of the border has added fire to the controversy over a growing trend of US companies relocating abroad. Greg Ip of The Economist will explain why the dysfunctional corporate-tax system in American may be to blame.
    * Plus, Dan Balz of The Washington Post will take a closer look at the dominant issues for voters leading into the midterm elections from raising the minimum wage to global instability and immigration reform. And be sure to read Gwen's Take on why voting for the candidate you dislike the least, may not be the best strategy in the voting booth this fall.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    State of Surveillance A Co-production of KQED & The Center for Investigative Reporting "State of Surveillance" goes inside California police departments where new technologies ranging from automated license plate readers to facial recognition technology are making it easier to fight crime, but are also raising concerns about privacy. Are these monitoring systems becoming dragnets filled with information about law-abiding citizens? duration 27:46   STEREO TVG
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#334H] Stiglitz On Tax Reform to Save The Middle Class In an encore presentation, Nobel Laureate economist Joseph E. Stiglitz says he's infuriated by America's growing inequality and at how the tax code has been manipulated and abused to place the burden on the earners of ordinary income - instead of the rich and powerful most able to pay. "We already have a system that isn't working," he tells Bill Moyers. "That has contributed to making America the most unequal society of the advanced countries."
    But he has a solution. Joseph Stiglitz recently published a call to action, a 27-page report for the Roosevelt Institute on how to reform our tax system and rebuild our country. "We can have a tax system that can help create a fairer society," he says. "Only ask the people at the top to pay their fair share. It's not asking a lot. It's just saying the top 1% shouldn't be paying a lower tax rate than somebody much further down the scale - [they] shouldn't have the opportunity to move money offshore."
    Stiglitz believes that taxes can be used as incentives: "If your taxes say we want to encourage real investments in America, then you get real investment in America. But I also believe that you have to shape incentives and that markets on their own don't necessarily shape them the right way."
    Now a professor at Columbia University, Joseph E. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers in the Clinton White House, as chief economist of the World Bank and is currently president of the International Economic Association. He is a best-selling author with a worldwide following that includes presidents and prime ministers.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1752] PROBATION FOR PROFIT - Many jurisdictions in the US have turned over their probation procedures to for-profit companies collecting fines and monitoring individuals accused of minor infractions. As small fees and interest charges begin to build, people who already cannot afford their fines can end up in jail owing exorbitant amounts. "Even beyond the basic ethical conundrum of incarceration for profit, there are other fundamental faith principles" at stake, says Caroline Isaacs, a program officer for the American Friends Service Committee. "Redemption and forgiveness really are falling by the wayside when we profitize these functions."
    THE REBBE'S LEGACY - Rabbi Menachem Mendel Schneerson, also known simply as the Rebbe, was the leader of the Chabad Lubavitch Hasidic movement when he died 20 years ago. Today, the movement has tripled in size and the Rebbe's many followers continue to remember him with visits to his gravesite. The Rebbe's personality and teachings were well-received by Jews and non-Jews alike, and his followers have established Chabad centers for teaching in over 80 countries around the world. "The Rebbe inaugurated the first attempt in all of Jewish history to reach every Jewish community and every Jew in the world," says his biographer, Rabbi Joseph Telushkin. "No one was regarded as insignificant."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    QUEST [#604H] The Physics of Biking/Whale Shark Investigate the forces that allow humans to balance on a bicycle with researchers from Davis, California who are trying to understand the physics of riding a bike. And, meet Bay Area researchers working to protect frogs across the state and across the world. Plus, explore whale sharks with Kip Evans, a wildlife filmmaker from Pacific Grove, California. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2210H] More Powerful Than An Army As the 50th anniversary approaches of enactment of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an American Forum special mini-documentary featuring leading scholars from around the US examines how the law ending racial segregation also radically opened new opportunities for women, gays and lesbians, Native Americans, and other ethnicities. The episode will also explore Supreme Court decisions suggesting trouble ahead for the US law viewed as the most historic of the 20th century. (This episode also kicks off a special series of rebroadcasts during summer 2014 marking the 50th anniversary of Freedom Summer and the peak of the Civil Rights Movement.) duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1303] East Texas Zay Harding takes roping lessons and experiences the famous Gun Show in Ft. Worth, visits the Book Depository with an eyewitness to the Kennedy assassination in Dallas, travels to the oil fields in Kilgore, stops at the Huntsville State Penitentiary, tours the Johnson Space Center with Alan Bean in Houston and celebrates the 4th of July in Chappell Hill. duration 57:31   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Earthflight, A Nature Special Presentation [#101H] North America Snow geese, pelicans, and bald eagles fly over the Great Plains, the Grand Canyon, Alaska and the Golden Gate Bridge as they encounter and engage with bears, dolphins, bison, and spawning fish. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 4:00 pm
    Nova [#4111H] Why Sharks Attack In recent years, an unusual spate of deadly shark attacks has gripped Australia, resulting in five deaths in 10 months. At the same time, great white sharks have begun appearing in growing numbers off the beaches of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, not far from the waters where Steven Spielberg filmed the ultimate shark fright film, Jaws. What's behind the mysterious arrival of this apex predator in an area where they've rarely been seen for hundreds of years? Are deadly encounters with tourists inevitable? To separate fact from fear, Nova teams up with leading shark experts in Australia and the United States to discover the science behind the great white's hunting instincts. Do sharks ever target humans or is each attack a tragic case of mistaken identity? Can a deeper understanding of shark senses lead scientists to design effective deterrents and help prevent future attacks? With shark populations around the world plummeting, scientists race to unlock the secrets of these powerful creatures of the deep in their quest to save people -- and sharks. duration 55:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Operation Maneater [#101H] Great White Shark Mark Evans travels to Western Australia, where seven people have been killed by sharks in the last three years. Authorities have implemented radical measures to catch and kill any shark they deem a threat. Evans wants to find non-lethal solutions to keep people - and sharks - safe. He enters the water to attach tracking tags to great whites; joins beach patrol teams searching for sharks; and tests a new "multi-spectral" camera that spots sharks from the air even when they are hidden several meters underwater. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#204H] Included: NewsHour Weekend examines the Paleo Diet, which has gained popularity in recent years. Advocates of the diet promote eating foods they say are more in line with what our ancient ancestors ate, such as meat and vegetables rather than dairy and grains, which were introduced after the invention of agriculture. But the diet's modern version may not actually give an accurate picture of what our predecessors really ate. Science writer Ann Gibbons joins Hari Sreenivasan to discuss how to follow the real Paleo Diet. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    State of Surveillance A Co-production of KQED & The Center for Investigative Reporting "State of Surveillance" goes inside California police departments where new technologies ranging from automated license plate readers to facial recognition technology are making it easier to fight crime, but are also raising concerns about privacy. Are these monitoring systems becoming dragnets filled with information about law-abiding citizens? duration 27:46   STEREO TVG
  • 7:00 pm
    Global Voices [#714] Here Comes Uncle Joe He is not their uncle, and his name is not Joe. But to the old ladies of An-dong, a rural community in southeastern Korea, Uncle Joe is almost the only contact they have with the modern world. As the young leave these rural areas to acquire higher education and to find high salary jobs in the cities, there are no services or people to support old people. In this situation, Uncle Joe becomes the only man for the old.
    However, his road taken isn't always happy. Because of their advanced years, Joe often encounters his old customer-friends' misery and death. Moreover, as he reflects on his life, he faces his inner conflict and shame. In this film, we see how Uncle Joe serves these communities with humor and attention, how love and friendship are infused in life, and how he overcomes his conflicts with his friends.
    duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Global Voices [#509] Acrobat Fabrice Champion, a renowned trapeze artist, hit another acrobat in mid-air during a show and was paralyzed. Following years of rehabilitation therapy, he returned to the circus as director and teacher. duration 53:00   STEREO
  • 9:00 pm
    Earthflight, A Nature Special Presentation [#101H] North America Snow geese, pelicans, and bald eagles fly over the Great Plains, the Grand Canyon, Alaska and the Golden Gate Bridge as they encounter and engage with bears, dolphins, bison, and spawning fish. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    My Wild Affair [#103] The Rhino Who Joined The Family Rescued from flooding caused by the damming of the Zambezi River, Rupert, an orphaned black rhinoceros, was brought up in the suburban family home of wildlife vet Dr. John Condy. Rupert captured the hearts of the vet's four young children before his eventual release into the wild. Fifty years later, the children are searching for clues to their childhood friend's fate. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#714] Here Comes Uncle Joe He is not their uncle, and his name is not Joe. But to the old ladies of An-dong, a rural community in southeastern Korea, Uncle Joe is almost the only contact they have with the modern world. As the young leave these rural areas to acquire higher education and to find high salary jobs in the cities, there are no services or people to support old people. In this situation, Uncle Joe becomes the only man for the old.
    However, his road taken isn't always happy. Because of their advanced years, Joe often encounters his old customer-friends' misery and death. Moreover, as he reflects on his life, he faces his inner conflict and shame. In this film, we see how Uncle Joe serves these communities with humor and attention, how love and friendship are infused in life, and how he overcomes his conflicts with his friends.
    duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#509] Acrobat Fabrice Champion, a renowned trapeze artist, hit another acrobat in mid-air during a show and was paralyzed. Following years of rehabilitation therapy, he returned to the circus as director and teacher. duration 53:00   STEREO
Sunday, August 31, 2014

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too