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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, August 23, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 23, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11039H] UKRAINE - The conflict in Ukraine escalated today as a convoy of Russian trucks rolled across the border without approval from the government in Kiev. Russian officials say the trucks carried only humanitarian aid, but the Ukrainian government has condemned the action, though it will not use force to stop the trucks. Hari Sreenivasan discusses this development and its potential impact with New York Times correspondent Andrew Kramer, who is in Donetsk.
    IRAQ - Kurdish military forces fighting to defend Iraq's northern frontier say they need additional US support, including more modern American weapons, to battle the Islamic State militant group. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner reports from Jalawla, outside of Baghdad.
    ORANGE IS THE NEW BLACK - The 2014 Primetime Emmy Awards will air Monday night, and "Orange is the New Black" is one of the most celebrated shows of the season. Hari Sreenivasan sits down with Piper Kerman, author of the memoir that inspired the hit series.
    SUMMER LEARNING LOSS - As the start of the school year approaches, teachers anticipate that students may have forgotten some of what they learned last year. Is there any way to prevent "summer learning loss"? Special correspondent for education John Merrow of Learning Matters explores some possible solutions.
    MARCUS & GERSON - Ruth Marcus and Michael Gerson of the Washington Post analyze this week's top stories.
    ALS ICE BUCKET CHALLENGE - The "ALS Ice Bucket Challenge" is sweeping the nation. Individuals, including many celebrities, have posted videos of themselves pouring ice water over their heads, in an effort to raise funds and awareness for the fight against ALS, or Lou Gehrig's disease. Judy Woodruff speaks with Barbara Newhouse, president and CEO of the ALS Association, one of the charities at the center of the challenge.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33168H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, Fed Chair Janet Yellen says the economy is improving but not enough to worry the market about moving up the rate-hiking time table. And, people are once again flipping homes but this time around the game has changed. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3274] Tavis talks with Oscar-nominated actor Frank Langella. The 3-time Tony-winning thespian and best-selling author shares his thoughts on celebrating more than 50 years in the business. Originally aired on April 9, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Time Scanners [#103] Petra Structural engineer Steve Burrows leads his team of laser-scanning experts to Jordan to scan the ancient desert city of Petra. Using 3D laser-scanning technology, he wants to uncover its construction secrets and shed new light on this architectural wonderland lost to the West for more than 1000 years. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1751] RELIGIOUS RESPONSE TO FERGUSON - As protests continue in Ferguson, Missouri in the wake of the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed African-American teenager, many religious leaders and members of faith communities are calling for new national conversations about racial inequality, social justice, and the use of police force. R&E discusses the responses of religious communities with Alton Pollard III, dean of Howard University Divinity School, and Russell Moore, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention. "I'm particularly concerned when I see white people and African-American people not having conversations with one another about what's happening in Ferguson," says Moore. "That needs to change in our own congregational life." Observes Pollard: "We haven't always been able to figure out our way to each other, recognizing our commonalities, our similarities, even with all of the issues that continue to divide. "
    CHINA ORPHAN CARE - Former Hollywood screenwriter Jenny Bowen was moved to adopt two orphaned Chinese girls after she and her husband learned about the widespread abandonment and neglect of children in China, many of them girls. Bowen went on to found the Half the Sky Foundation, which has trained 12,000 teachers and nannies in 27 Chinese provinces to care for the orphans. "Before Half the Sky, children were tied to their chairs. They were lying in bed. You could see the tragedy," says Bowen. "These children are going on with their lives. They're being treated like their lives matter. They know it, and they know they're loved, so they thrive."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1109] Dynamic Value Duo This week features an exclusive get together with two outstanding value investors. Weitz Funds' Wally Weitz and investment advisor Tom Russo discuss the different places each is finding value and why Warren Buffet is their investment hero. Guests: Tom Russo, Partner, Gardner Russo & Gardner; General Partner, Semper Vic Partners, L.P.; Wallace Weitz, President & Founder, Weitz Funds; Portfolio Manager, Weitz Partners Value Fund. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2324H] SIL's Appalling Acts Include Violence Against Women; "Breeders", New Film Challenges Ethics of Surrogacy; Behind the Headlines: Stopping Child Abuse and Neglect. PANELISTS: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, The Gender Equality Project's Megan Beyer, Republican Strategist Rina Shah, Incite Unlimited's Avis Jones DeWeever. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asia Insight [#204] duration 28:03   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Wilderness: The Great Debate For 40 years, the American West has been the nation's battleground for the preservation of wild lands. This one hour documentary explores a host of environmental issues in the American West. Robert Redford joins a cast of leading experts and activists on both sides of this complex conversation on the future of land management in American West and its affect on the planet. The program is narrated by Peter Coyote. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Rebels with a Cause Narrated by Oscar-winning actress Frances McDormand, this program spotlights a group of dedicated conservationists who fought to preserve open space, protect agriculture and wildlife, and establish public parks near San Francisco. Beginning in the 1950s, ordinary citizens from all walks of life, concerned by the intentions of residential land developers and the environmental cost of "progress," began banding together to save a vast stretch of Northern California coastline. Their passionate activism at both the local and federal level helped create Point Reyes National Seashore and the Golden Gate National Recreation Area. These precedent-setting efforts also raised Californians' awareness of their power to promote change, fostered a national movement to preserve open spaces, and shaped the environmental movement of today. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1751] RELIGIOUS RESPONSE TO FERGUSON - As protests continue in Ferguson, Missouri in the wake of the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed African-American teenager, many religious leaders and members of faith communities are calling for new national conversations about racial inequality, social justice, and the use of police force. R&E discusses the responses of religious communities with Alton Pollard III, dean of Howard University Divinity School, and Russell Moore, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention. "I'm particularly concerned when I see white people and African-American people not having conversations with one another about what's happening in Ferguson," says Moore. "That needs to change in our own congregational life." Observes Pollard: "We haven't always been able to figure out our way to each other, recognizing our commonalities, our similarities, even with all of the issues that continue to divide. "
    CHINA ORPHAN CARE - Former Hollywood screenwriter Jenny Bowen was moved to adopt two orphaned Chinese girls after she and her husband learned about the widespread abandonment and neglect of children in China, many of them girls. Bowen went on to found the Half the Sky Foundation, which has trained 12,000 teachers and nannies in 27 Chinese provinces to care for the orphans. "Before Half the Sky, children were tied to their chairs. They were lying in bed. You could see the tragedy," says Bowen. "These children are going on with their lives. They're being treated like their lives matter. They know it, and they know they're loved, so they thrive."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#333H] No to Tax Dodgers, Yes to Fair Play When it comes to paying taxes, the latest ploy in corporate America's never-ending search for loopholes and escape hatches is "inversion," creative accounting by which companies pretend to be headquartered abroad and make big profits on which they pay little or no US taxes. Inversion is just one more way jobs are being lost overseas and revenue is being drained from government and its services. That's why a recent report by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz for the Roosevelt Institute is so important. Paying a fair share of taxes and cracking down on corporate tax dodgers, Stiglitz writes, could be a cure for inequality and a faltering economy.
    This week, in an encore presentation, Stiglitz tells Bill Moyers that Apple, Google, GE and a host of other Fortune 500 companies are creating what amounts to "an unlimited IRA for corporations." He says, "I think we can use our tax system to create a better society, to be an expression of our true values. But if people don't think that their tax system is fair, they're not going to want to contribute. It's going to be difficult to get them to pay. And, unfortunately, right now, our tax system is neither fair nor efficient. We have a tax system that reflects not the interest of the middle. We have a tax system that reflects the interest of the 1%."
    Joseph Stiglitz's best-selling books - including The Price of Inequality, The Trillion Dollar War and Freefall - have shaped worldwide debates on globalization, income inequality and the role of government in the financial marketplace. He is currently a professor at Columbia University, a senior fellow at the Roosevelt Institute and president of the International Economic Association. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Bill Clinton, and as chief economist of the World Bank.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#261] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    This American Land [#404] Seamount of Life. Arctic Traffic, Altamaha River Pollution, Diatoms and Climate Change Using special recording technology to document the spawning of endangered fish like the Nassau grouper, scientists in the Caribbean study spawning aggregation sites that are critically important for the survival of many ocean species. We follow them to one of these sites off the western coast of Puerto Rico that has been severely impacted by overfishing; conservationists say an effectively enforced marine protected area is urgently needed there. Climate change is causing a rapid loss of summer sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, opening the region to more shipping traffic, oil exploration and other industrial activities that were never possible before. This is creating growing risks to whales, walruses, seals and seabirds - especially in the narrow migration corridor in the Bering Strait. The traffic also poses new risks to the region's local native people who hunt and fish in small boats. Conservationists are pressing for new measures to protect the marine environment, wildlife and welfare of local residents in the changing Arctic. The Altamaha River in southern Georgia is a major waterway, still undammed, flowing in its natural state more than a hundred miles to the Atlantic and its spectacular estuary. But there's a large pulp mill on the river that has been operating for decades, and critics say it has been discharging pollution into the river which they allege the pulp company refuses to clean up, and which the state of Georgia has been slow to address. We go to the river to see for ourselves. In another story on the warming Arctic, we meet researchers in Greenland who gather samples of fossilized microscopic algae in lake sediments, discovering vital clues about past and current climate change in the region. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5407H] Simmering racial tensions on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri and US military action in Iraq were just two of the issues President Obama addressed during his vacation on Martha's Vineyard this week.
    * Calm is slowly returning to the streets of Ferguson where clashes between police and protestors upset over the shooting death of an unarmed teenager have gone on for nearly 2 weeks. In addition to a grand jury investigation, Attorney General Eric Holder has launched a federal probe into possible civil rights violations surrounding the police-involved shooting of Michael Brown. While the president returned to the White House on Monday to address the situation in Ferguson, his decision not to visit the town was met with some criticism.
    * As the story in Ferguson plays out, President Obama is also working on the international threat posed by ISIL, the terrorist group also known as the Islamic State. The militants released a video this week showing the savage execution of journalist James Foley. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel calls the extremists an imminent threat to America adding, "This is beyond anything that we've seen. We must prepare for everything." President Obama remains resolute that the US will continue airstrikes against ISIL targets in Iraq, but will that be enough to stop the brutal terror organization? * In Texas, GOP Governor Rick Perry finds himself fighting felony charges just as his likely campaign for president was getting some traction. Supporters call the charges a political ploy while Perry is painting himself as a victim of an over-zealous Democratic prosecutor. Joining Gwen Ifill around the table to discuss these issues and more are Pierre Thomas of ABC News, Christi Parsons of Tribune Newspapers, Nancy Youssef of McClatchy Newspapers, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#140H] Special Edition: California Prisons Invest in Rehabilitation for "Lifer" Inmates
    Special Edition: California Prisons Invest in Rehabilitation for "Lifer" Inmates

    Until recently, prisoners serving life sentences in California had slim chances of ever getting paroled. With sentences of 15, 25 or 30 years to life, most of these so-called "lifers" are doing time for murder. Now, driven by court rulings that make it harder to deny parole, a record number of lifers are getting out -- nearly 2,300 since 2009, or more than three times the number paroled in the previous 17 years combined.

    For the first time, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) is offering classes aimed directly at lifers to prepare them for life on the outside. The prisoners who participate don't know if they'll ever get out, but they say the classes help them develop life skills, understand the impact of their crimes, and show the parole board that they're no longer a risk to public safety.

    Scott Shafer goes inside Solano Prison in Vacaville to see what the CDCR's programs have to offer and also hears from a paroled lifer about his struggles and successes.

    Thuy Vu talks with parole board chief Jennifer Shaffer about what the board looks for and how hearings are conducted. A panel discussion moderated by Scott Shafer provides additional perspective.

    Guests:
    • Jennifer Shaffer, Board of Parole Hearings Executive Officer
    • Carla Javits, REDF CEO & President
    • Gary Lieberstein, Napa County District Attorney
    • Marvin Speed, California State Parole Administrator

    Further Reporting:
    New Classes Aim to Help Paroled "Lifer" Inmates After Release
    More Lifers Coverage

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17234H] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2324H] SIL's Appalling Acts Include Violence Against Women; "Breeders", New Film Challenges Ethics of Surrogacy; Behind the Headlines: Stopping Child Abuse and Neglect. PANELISTS: The Heritage Foundation's Jennifer Marshall, The Gender Equality Project's Megan Beyer, Republican Strategist Rina Shah, Incite Unlimited's Avis Jones DeWeever. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3235H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#206H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#333H] No to Tax Dodgers, Yes to Fair Play When it comes to paying taxes, the latest ploy in corporate America's never-ending search for loopholes and escape hatches is "inversion," creative accounting by which companies pretend to be headquartered abroad and make big profits on which they pay little or no US taxes. Inversion is just one more way jobs are being lost overseas and revenue is being drained from government and its services. That's why a recent report by Nobel Prize-winning economist Joseph E. Stiglitz for the Roosevelt Institute is so important. Paying a fair share of taxes and cracking down on corporate tax dodgers, Stiglitz writes, could be a cure for inequality and a faltering economy.
    This week, in an encore presentation, Stiglitz tells Bill Moyers that Apple, Google, GE and a host of other Fortune 500 companies are creating what amounts to "an unlimited IRA for corporations." He says, "I think we can use our tax system to create a better society, to be an expression of our true values. But if people don't think that their tax system is fair, they're not going to want to contribute. It's going to be difficult to get them to pay. And, unfortunately, right now, our tax system is neither fair nor efficient. We have a tax system that reflects not the interest of the middle. We have a tax system that reflects the interest of the 1%."
    Joseph Stiglitz's best-selling books - including The Price of Inequality, The Trillion Dollar War and Freefall - have shaped worldwide debates on globalization, income inequality and the role of government in the financial marketplace. He is currently a professor at Columbia University, a senior fellow at the Roosevelt Institute and president of the International Economic Association. Stiglitz served as chairman of the Council of Economic Advisers under President Bill Clinton, and as chief economist of the World Bank.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1751] RELIGIOUS RESPONSE TO FERGUSON - As protests continue in Ferguson, Missouri in the wake of the fatal police shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed African-American teenager, many religious leaders and members of faith communities are calling for new national conversations about racial inequality, social justice, and the use of police force. R&E discusses the responses of religious communities with Alton Pollard III, dean of Howard University Divinity School, and Russell Moore, president of the Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission of the Southern Baptist Convention. "I'm particularly concerned when I see white people and African-American people not having conversations with one another about what's happening in Ferguson," says Moore. "That needs to change in our own congregational life." Observes Pollard: "We haven't always been able to figure out our way to each other, recognizing our commonalities, our similarities, even with all of the issues that continue to divide. "
    CHINA ORPHAN CARE - Former Hollywood screenwriter Jenny Bowen was moved to adopt two orphaned Chinese girls after she and her husband learned about the widespread abandonment and neglect of children in China, many of them girls. Bowen went on to found the Half the Sky Foundation, which has trained 12,000 teachers and nannies in 27 Chinese provinces to care for the orphans. "Before Half the Sky, children were tied to their chairs. They were lying in bed. You could see the tragedy," says Bowen. "These children are going on with their lives. They're being treated like their lives matter. They know it, and they know they're loved, so they thrive."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#334] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Conducting Hope Today, 2.3 million people in the United States - an all-time high - call prison home. Nearly two-thirds of inmates will face re-arrest within three years, and nearly 50% will return to prison. In response to these disheartening statistics, one innovative program in Kansas aims to reduce the high rate of recidivism in an unexpected way - through the power of music.
    This program reveals the story behind the East Hill Singers, the only secular prison choir in the country allowed to perform outside prison gates. During the documentary, choir director (and former opera singer) Kirk Carson works tirelessly to prepare the men - minimum security inmates at Lansing Correctional Facility - for an upcoming public performance alongside community volunteers and former inmates. Carson's passion never wavers despite the challenges of turning the novices into concert-ready singers capable of performing a repertoire ranging from traditional choral to contemporary music to a "rap of redemption." For many of the inmates, whose offenses range from drug-related crimes to burglary, rape and murder, the choir teaches valuable real-world lessons about discipline, responsibility and teamwork. These traits, along with a newfound self-esteem, confidence and pride, eventually may ultimately help ease the men's reintegration back into society.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Death and Politics at Attica Forty years after the bloodiest one-day encounter between Americans since the Civil War, the dead remain buried along with the truth. Until now. Based on interviews with eyewitnesses who just now are telling their stories, as well as access to newly discovered documents, the film sheds new light on exactly what happened at Attica between September 9-13, 1971. Death & Politics at Attica raises compelling new questions about the 39 deaths at Attica, White House involvement, and the corrupting influence of Nelson Rockefeller's political aspirations before, during, and long after the deadly retaking of the prison. Former hostage Michael Smith said that "the cover up started as soon as the shooting stopped." This film reveals that the truth actually may have been concealed long before that. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    POV [#2708H] A World Not Ours This film is a passionate, bittersweet account of one family's multi-generational experience living as permanent refugees. Now a Danish resident, director Mahdi Fleifel grew up in the Ain el-Helweh refugee camp in southern Lebanon, established in 1948 as a temporary refuge for exiled Palestinians. Today, the camp houses 70,000 people and is the hometown of generations of Palestinians. The filmmaker's childhood memories are surprisingly warm and humorous, a testament to the resilience of the community. Yet his yearly visits reveal the increasing desperation of family and friends who remain trapped in psychological as well as political limbo. duration 1:26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:30 pm
    PBS Previews: The Roosevelts This program previews Ken Burns' upcoming film, The Roosevelts. Using a celebrity host to introduce each "chapter" of the show, clips from the series, combined with interviews and behind-the-scenes material, it showcases the content of the series and what goes in to making a Ken Burns epic. The 7-part, 14-hour series premieres in the Fall of 2014. duration 26:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#201H] Included: As more and more employers throughout the country use background checks to review their company's applicants, Megan Thompson takes a look at the job-screening process, which has recently come under fire for inaccurate reports that can cost people jobs. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5407H] Simmering racial tensions on the streets of Ferguson, Missouri and US military action in Iraq were just two of the issues President Obama addressed during his vacation on Martha's Vineyard this week.
    * Calm is slowly returning to the streets of Ferguson where clashes between police and protestors upset over the shooting death of an unarmed teenager have gone on for nearly 2 weeks. In addition to a grand jury investigation, Attorney General Eric Holder has launched a federal probe into possible civil rights violations surrounding the police-involved shooting of Michael Brown. While the president returned to the White House on Monday to address the situation in Ferguson, his decision not to visit the town was met with some criticism.
    * As the story in Ferguson plays out, President Obama is also working on the international threat posed by ISIL, the terrorist group also known as the Islamic State. The militants released a video this week showing the savage execution of journalist James Foley. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel calls the extremists an imminent threat to America adding, "This is beyond anything that we've seen. We must prepare for everything." President Obama remains resolute that the US will continue airstrikes against ISIL targets in Iraq, but will that be enough to stop the brutal terror organization? * In Texas, GOP Governor Rick Perry finds himself fighting felony charges just as his likely campaign for president was getting some traction. Supporters call the charges a political ploy while Perry is painting himself as a victim of an over-zealous Democratic prosecutor. Joining Gwen Ifill around the table to discuss these issues and more are Pierre Thomas of ABC News, Christi Parsons of Tribune Newspapers, Nancy Youssef of McClatchy Newspapers, and Amy Walter of the Cook Political Report.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#140H] Special Edition: California Prisons Invest in Rehabilitation for "Lifer" Inmates
    Special Edition: California Prisons Invest in Rehabilitation for "Lifer" Inmates

    Until recently, prisoners serving life sentences in California had slim chances of ever getting paroled. With sentences of 15, 25 or 30 years to life, most of these so-called "lifers" are doing time for murder. Now, driven by court rulings that make it harder to deny parole, a record number of lifers are getting out -- nearly 2,300 since 2009, or more than three times the number paroled in the previous 17 years combined.

    For the first time, the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) is offering classes aimed directly at lifers to prepare them for life on the outside. The prisoners who participate don't know if they'll ever get out, but they say the classes help them develop life skills, understand the impact of their crimes, and show the parole board that they're no longer a risk to public safety.

    Scott Shafer goes inside Solano Prison in Vacaville to see what the CDCR's programs have to offer and also hears from a paroled lifer about his struggles and successes.

    Thuy Vu talks with parole board chief Jennifer Shaffer about what the board looks for and how hearings are conducted. A panel discussion moderated by Scott Shafer provides additional perspective.

    Guests:
    • Jennifer Shaffer, Board of Parole Hearings Executive Officer
    • Carla Javits, REDF CEO & President
    • Gary Lieberstein, Napa County District Attorney
    • Marvin Speed, California State Parole Administrator

    Further Reporting:
    New Classes Aim to Help Paroled "Lifer" Inmates After Release
    More Lifers Coverage

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#602H] Pump It Up: Heart Health Special Report Investigate the number one cause of death in America, heart disease, which kills close to 600,000 people each year - more than die from cancer, car accidents or AIDS. Meet a teenager trying to lower her risk; a heart attack patient and the team that saved her life, and a researcher working to one day rebuild a damaged heart from the inside out. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1302] Globe Trekker Food Hour: Spice Trails Merrilees Parker, Padma Lakshmi, Tyler Florence and Peter Gordon travel the world to see how control of the spice trails has made great cities and destroyed ancient civilizations. Our guides travel from the Molucca Islands of Indonesia, the original home of cloves and nutmeg, to the Indian province of Kerala, with its native pepper and cardamom. Leaving behind Sri Lanka's sublime cinnamon, they cross the oceans on Arab dhows, Chinese treasure junks and Portuguese caravels, in search of the world's flavor. Other stops along the trail include Venice, Beirut, Cairo, China, Spain and the Caribbean. Viewers will discover the secret spice blends that define the great cuisines of the world, including Jamaican jerk seasoning, Indian garam masala, Chinese 5-spice powder and Middle Eastern harissa. duration 57:32   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2907H] Raccoon Nation Are we, in an effort to outwit raccoons, actually making them smarter and unwittingly contributing to their evolutionary success? Are the ever more complex obstacles that our fast-paced urban world throws at them actually pushing the development of raccoon brains? In this film, scientists from around the world share their thoughts and work to help explore this scientific theory. Attempting to do something that has never been done before, they closely follow a family of urban raccoons as they navigate the complex world of a big city. duration 55:16   SRND51 TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#3813H] Finding Life Beyond Earth - Are We Alone? Scientists are on the verge of answering one of the greatest questions in history: are we alone? Combining the latest telescope images with dazzling CGI, this episode immerses audiences in the sights and sounds of alien worlds, while top astrobiologists explain how these places are changing how we think about the potential for life in our solar system. We used to think our neighboring planets and moons were fairly boring - mostly cold, dead rocks where life could never take hold. Today, however, the solar system looks wilder than we ever imagined. Powerful telescopes and unmanned space missions have revealed a wide range of dynamic environments - atmospheres thick with organic molecules, active volcanoes, and vast saltwater oceans. This ongoing revolution is forcing scientists to expand their ideas about what kinds of worlds could support life. And if we do find primitive life forms elsewhere in the solar system, it may well be that life is common in the universe -- the rule, and not the exception. duration 55:45   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 11:00 pm
    Nova [#3814H] Finding Life Beyond Earth - Moons and Beyond Scientists are on the verge of answering one of the greatest questions in history: are we alone? Combining the latest telescope images with dazzling CGI, "Finding Life Beyond Earth" immerses audiences in the sights and sounds of alien worlds, while top astrobiologists explain how these places are changing how we think about the potential for life in our solar system. We used to think our neighboring planets and moons were fairly boring -- mostly cold, dead rocks where life could never take hold. Today, however, the solar system looks wilder than we ever imagined. Powerful telescopes and unmanned space missions have revealed a wide range of dynamic environments -- atmospheres thick with organic molecules, active volcanoes, and vast saltwater oceans. This ongoing revolution is forcing scientists to expand their ideas about what kinds of worlds could support life. And if we do find primitive life forms elsewhere in the solar system, it may well be that life is common in the universe -- the rule, and not the exception. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#108] My Louisiana Love This film traces a young woman's quest to find a place in her Native American community as it reels from decades of environmental degradation. Monique Verdin returns to Southeast Louisiana to reunite with her Houma Indian family. But soon she sees that her people's traditional way of life is threatened by a cycle of man-made environmental crises. Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil leak are just the latest rounds in this century-old cycle that is forcing Monique's clan to adapt in new ways. Monique must overcome the loss of her house, her father, and her partner, and redefine the meaning of home. duration 1:17:09   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, August 23, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

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KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too