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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11035] FERGUSON - The National Guard has been deployed to Ferguson, Missouri in the latest effort to quell the violence and unrest that erupted following the shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, by a white police officer. The results of a privately conducted autopsy, released today by the attorneys for Brown's family, reveal that the 18-year-old was shot six times. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Yamiche Alcindor, a USA Today reporter who is on the ground in Ferguson. She then discusses the impact on the community with former Ferguson Mayor Brian Fletcher and State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal. EBOLA - Angry Liberian residents stormed an Ebola quarantine center in Monrovia Saturday night. Some charged that those sent to the center had received little care, others believed the Ebola outbreak to be a "hoax." Jeffrey Brown sits down with John Moore, a photographer for Getty Images who has been documenting the outbreak in Monrovia, and witnessed the attack.
    IRAQ - This weekend there were conflicting reports over who was in full control of the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq. The facility was captured by the Islamic State group earlier this month, but Iraqi government troops and Kurdish military forces have attempted to retake it, with U.S. support. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner is on assignment in Iraq. She reports on the latest developments in the region.
    TEACHER LED SCHOOLS - At a school in Boston, teachers have taken charge. Issues such as curriculum, budget and hiring are decided by consensus rather than a principal. John Tulenko of Learning Matters Television has the story.
    HUNGER IN AMERICA - A new report on hunger in the United States, released today by the nonprofit Feeding America, paints a grim picture. Jeffrey Brown is joined by Deborah Flateman, president and CEO of the Maryland Food Bank and a member of Feeding America's board, to examine the study's findings.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33164H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, no news was good news on Wall Street as a quiet August day ended with a 170-point gain on the Dow. And, you'll never guess how much it costs to raise kids. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3270] Tavis talks with Charles "Lil Buck" Riley, master of the style of dance known as "jookin'." The dancer who's been called the Baryshnikov of jookin' describes the free-style street dance that's become a sensation. Originally aired on June 27, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Autism: Coming of Age When people think of autism, they instinctively think of children. However, in the next 10 to 15 years, an estimated 800,000 children with autism will age out of the school system and transition into adulthood. Then, they will look to ill-prepared state and federal governments for the support services and resources to meet their many needs: a situation autism experts refer to as the "coming tsunami." This documentary provides an inside look at the lives of three adults with autism and includes interviews with their families and support teams. Autism and disability experts from Massachusetts, New York, Washington, Virginia and Pennsylvania also discuss the current system, impending challenges and possible outcomes for the future. duration 57:10   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#5102] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3271] Tavis talks with Academy Award-winning actress and director Anjelica Huston. Part of a third generation of Hollywood talent, Huston explains why she decided to write about her unusual upbringing. Originally aired on December 17, 2013 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia Insight [#202] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3233] Greece: Suicide Crisis and Depression Romania: Corruption and Intimidation - For decades, Romanian authorities have been fighting against endemic corruption, with increasing success. Now even the president's family has become the focus of investigations. One of the most serious scandals involves President Traian Basescu's brother, who is accused of taking a 250, 000 bribe from a Romanian criminal gang. In return he is alleged to have tried to influence the court investigating the clan - and video evidence has now surfaced. Parliament is demanding Basescu's resignation, saying he knew about the deal. The national anti-corruption directorate is investigating. France: Charm and Arrogance - Familiar scenarios for foreign tourists in Paris: a waiter brings coffee instead of water, or a hotel clerk supposedly can't understand English. Service in France is in need of improvement. France remains a hugely popular tourist destination. Hotel bookings are decreasing year by year, however, especially in the capital Paris. Service there doesn't exactly have the best reputation, while not speaking French can also be a major problem. That's set to change. Voluntary city guides called Paris Greeters accompany small groups of tourists, showing them local life in their own parts of town. At the same time, hotel and restaurant owners in particular are resisting the newly prescribed hospitality. Greece: Crisis and Desperation - Redundancies, bankruptcies, corruption: for years, Greeks have been reading the same headlines. Many can no longer take the constant pressure. The suicide rate in Greece is higher than it's ever been. Desperate pensioners, insolvent bank employees, jobless fathers - many poverty-stricken Greeks are taking their own lives. Government figures cite up to 3,000 suicides a year. Unofficially, the number is three times as high, even though suicide is a taboo topic in Greece. The Orthodox Church still denies a Christian burial to those who take their own lives, leading many families to register the suicides of relatives as accidents. Austria: Remembrance and Humanity - 101-year-old Marko Feingold once again attended the Alpine Peace Crossing this year, commemorating the flight of Jews over the Alps after the Second World War. Every year the Austrian village of Krimml commemorates the exodus of 5,000 Jewish refugees across the Alps in the summer of 1947. They were fleeing postwar anti-Semitism in Europe, and headed for Palestine to find a new home. Marko Feingold, the main organizer back then, takes part in the annual memorial peace hike over the Krimml Tauern pass. Now 101, he survived four concentration camps and is still fighting today for humane refugee policies the world over. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    History Detectives Special Investigations [#101H] Civil War Sabotage? It was one of the worst maritime naval disasters in US history. Officially, the death toll was 1500. Unofficially, the count may have been far higher. When it mysteriously exploded on April 27, 1865, the Mississippi steamboat USS Sultana was packed with Union soldiers. The war had ended that month; at every stop more and more men clamored to board the homeward-bound ship, which blew up mid-river. However, the story of the sinking quickly vanished from the papers. What really sank the Sultana? Was it Confederate sabotage? Securing the original investigative report and its archives allows the team to forensically examine and scientifically test theories of the boilers' failure. The team also researches the stories of a Confederate agent and spy who burned Union ships on the Mississippi and was an expert in using "coal torpedoes" and a former Union inspector's deathbed revelation. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    History Detectives Special Investigations [#102] The Disappearance of Glenn Miller One of the most celebrated, beloved entertainers of the wartime era takes off from England in heavy fog, heading to France to entertain troops. His plane vanishes. Glenn Miller's disappearance is perhaps the biggest mystery and cold case of World War II. This investigation contains a great deal of new information: Miller's pilot was a rank novice who had never flown over the English Channel, never mind in appalling weather; documents from a Lancaster bomber pilot support another possible accounting of the plane's disappearance; and a 17-year old plane spotter's notebook - discovered in 2012 at a UK Antiques Roadshow - answers a question that has long baffled investigators: which route did Miller's aircraft take? In addition, the German-speaking Miller was working for the US Army's Psychological Warfare Division, recording German language propaganda broadcasts and musical performances. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Local USA [#104] Head Trauma at War Traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, has received increasing attention especially among athletes and soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. We examine the links between TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder, and the damage they can do, through the story of retired Army sergeant Andrew Reeves of Colchester, Vermont. duration 26:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Local USA [#103] Finding One's Voice Searching for an artistic voice and a way of expressing oneself. An autistic artist in New Jersey finds the best tools to communicate his wonderful works of art -- despite barely uttering a word -- and a young Chicago prodigy connects with her inner performer and discovers her electrifying voice. duration 26:28   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Autism: Coming of Age When people think of autism, they instinctively think of children. However, in the next 10 to 15 years, an estimated 800,000 children with autism will age out of the school system and transition into adulthood. Then, they will look to ill-prepared state and federal governments for the support services and resources to meet their many needs: a situation autism experts refer to as the "coming tsunami." This documentary provides an inside look at the lives of three adults with autism and includes interviews with their families and support teams. Autism and disability experts from Massachusetts, New York, Washington, Virginia and Pennsylvania also discuss the current system, impending challenges and possible outcomes for the future. duration 57:10   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3271] Tavis talks with Academy Award-winning actress and director Anjelica Huston. Part of a third generation of Hollywood talent, Huston explains why she decided to write about her unusual upbringing. Originally aired on December 17, 2013 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3270] Tavis talks with Charles "Lil Buck" Riley, master of the style of dance known as "jookin'." The dancer who's been called the Baryshnikov of jookin' describes the free-style street dance that's become a sensation. Originally aired on June 27, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia Insight [#202] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3233] Greece: Suicide Crisis and Depression Romania: Corruption and Intimidation - For decades, Romanian authorities have been fighting against endemic corruption, with increasing success. Now even the president's family has become the focus of investigations. One of the most serious scandals involves President Traian Basescu's brother, who is accused of taking a 250, 000 bribe from a Romanian criminal gang. In return he is alleged to have tried to influence the court investigating the clan - and video evidence has now surfaced. Parliament is demanding Basescu's resignation, saying he knew about the deal. The national anti-corruption directorate is investigating. France: Charm and Arrogance - Familiar scenarios for foreign tourists in Paris: a waiter brings coffee instead of water, or a hotel clerk supposedly can't understand English. Service in France is in need of improvement. France remains a hugely popular tourist destination. Hotel bookings are decreasing year by year, however, especially in the capital Paris. Service there doesn't exactly have the best reputation, while not speaking French can also be a major problem. That's set to change. Voluntary city guides called Paris Greeters accompany small groups of tourists, showing them local life in their own parts of town. At the same time, hotel and restaurant owners in particular are resisting the newly prescribed hospitality. Greece: Crisis and Desperation - Redundancies, bankruptcies, corruption: for years, Greeks have been reading the same headlines. Many can no longer take the constant pressure. The suicide rate in Greece is higher than it's ever been. Desperate pensioners, insolvent bank employees, jobless fathers - many poverty-stricken Greeks are taking their own lives. Government figures cite up to 3,000 suicides a year. Unofficially, the number is three times as high, even though suicide is a taboo topic in Greece. The Orthodox Church still denies a Christian burial to those who take their own lives, leading many families to register the suicides of relatives as accidents. Austria: Remembrance and Humanity - 101-year-old Marko Feingold once again attended the Alpine Peace Crossing this year, commemorating the flight of Jews over the Alps after the Second World War. Every year the Austrian village of Krimml commemorates the exodus of 5,000 Jewish refugees across the Alps in the summer of 1947. They were fleeing postwar anti-Semitism in Europe, and headed for Palestine to find a new home. Marko Feingold, the main organizer back then, takes part in the annual memorial peace hike over the Krimml Tauern pass. Now 101, he survived four concentration camps and is still fighting today for humane refugee policies the world over. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    History Detectives Special Investigations [#101H] Civil War Sabotage? It was one of the worst maritime naval disasters in US history. Officially, the death toll was 1500. Unofficially, the count may have been far higher. When it mysteriously exploded on April 27, 1865, the Mississippi steamboat USS Sultana was packed with Union soldiers. The war had ended that month; at every stop more and more men clamored to board the homeward-bound ship, which blew up mid-river. However, the story of the sinking quickly vanished from the papers. What really sank the Sultana? Was it Confederate sabotage? Securing the original investigative report and its archives allows the team to forensically examine and scientifically test theories of the boilers' failure. The team also researches the stories of a Confederate agent and spy who burned Union ships on the Mississippi and was an expert in using "coal torpedoes" and a former Union inspector's deathbed revelation. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    History Detectives Special Investigations [#102] The Disappearance of Glenn Miller One of the most celebrated, beloved entertainers of the wartime era takes off from England in heavy fog, heading to France to entertain troops. His plane vanishes. Glenn Miller's disappearance is perhaps the biggest mystery and cold case of World War II. This investigation contains a great deal of new information: Miller's pilot was a rank novice who had never flown over the English Channel, never mind in appalling weather; documents from a Lancaster bomber pilot support another possible accounting of the plane's disappearance; and a 17-year old plane spotter's notebook - discovered in 2012 at a UK Antiques Roadshow - answers a question that has long baffled investigators: which route did Miller's aircraft take? In addition, the German-speaking Miller was working for the US Army's Psychological Warfare Division, recording German language propaganda broadcasts and musical performances. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Local USA [#104] Head Trauma at War Traumatic brain injuries, or TBI, has received increasing attention especially among athletes and soldiers returning from combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. We examine the links between TBI and post-traumatic stress disorder, and the damage they can do, through the story of retired Army sergeant Andrew Reeves of Colchester, Vermont. duration 26:52   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 pm
    Local USA [#103] Finding One's Voice Searching for an artistic voice and a way of expressing oneself. An autistic artist in New Jersey finds the best tools to communicate his wonderful works of art -- despite barely uttering a word -- and a young Chicago prodigy connects with her inner performer and discovers her electrifying voice. duration 26:28   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#5102] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#10165] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3271] Tavis talks with Academy Award-winning actress and director Anjelica Huston. Part of a third generation of Hollywood talent, Huston explains why she decided to write about her unusual upbringing. Originally aired on December 17, 2013 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33165H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, homeowners poured money into renovation projects and that helped Home Depot's bottomline. But is the trend expected to continue? And, how the Ice Bucket Challenge is changing the business model for charitable giving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11036H] FERGUSON - Unrest continues to grip Ferguson, Missouri as the National Guard struggles to help restore order. Meanwhile, a new poll conducted by the Pew Research Center has found a stark racial divide in reactions to the Michael Brown shooting and the ongoing protests and violence in Ferguson. Judy Woodruff explores multiple perspectives on the situation with Yamiche Alcindor, a USA Today reporter who is on the ground in Ferguson, Carroll Doherty, the director of political research at the Pew Research Center, Gil Alba, a former detective for the New York City Police Department, and Ronald Hampton, a former community relations officer for the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department.
    EBOLA - The death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues to rise, and concern about the strain the epidemic is placing on local resources is growing. The head of Doctors Without Borders has said that the threat of Ebola has also threatened access to basic health care for many people in West Africa. Jeffrey Brown sits down with Dr. Joanne Liu, the international president of Doctors Without Borders, to discuss the outbreak and its impact.
    INDONESIA: SHARIA LAW - In the years after a devastating earthquake and ensuing tsunami, one region of Indonesia has embraced Sharia law. Special correspondent Kira Kay reports from Aceh about the laws in that province and their impact on local life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33165H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, homeowners poured money into renovation projects and that helped Home Depot's bottomline. But is the trend expected to continue? And, how the Ice Bucket Challenge is changing the business model for charitable giving. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4017] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#5102] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3667H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11036H] FERGUSON - Unrest continues to grip Ferguson, Missouri as the National Guard struggles to help restore order. Meanwhile, a new poll conducted by the Pew Research Center has found a stark racial divide in reactions to the Michael Brown shooting and the ongoing protests and violence in Ferguson. Judy Woodruff explores multiple perspectives on the situation with Yamiche Alcindor, a USA Today reporter who is on the ground in Ferguson, Carroll Doherty, the director of political research at the Pew Research Center, Gil Alba, a former detective for the New York City Police Department, and Ronald Hampton, a former community relations officer for the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department.
    EBOLA - The death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues to rise, and concern about the strain the epidemic is placing on local resources is growing. The head of Doctors Without Borders has said that the threat of Ebola has also threatened access to basic health care for many people in West Africa. Jeffrey Brown sits down with Dr. Joanne Liu, the international president of Doctors Without Borders, to discuss the outbreak and its impact.
    INDONESIA: SHARIA LAW - In the years after a devastating earthquake and ensuing tsunami, one region of Indonesia has embraced Sharia law. Special correspondent Kira Kay reports from Aceh about the laws in that province and their impact on local life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3667H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#20172H] duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3667H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3272] Tavis talks with legendary singer-songwriter and social justice activist David Crosby. In his first interview since heart surgery earlier this year, the two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Famer describes the effort behind his first solo album in 20 years, "Croz." Originally aired on April 8, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3667H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#201] Meet the teams and watch insightful interviews in Southern California with the CEO & cofounder of Volcom Clothing and a music director who is credited for the American radio premiere of Moby and Garbage. duration 26:44   TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3667H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11036H] FERGUSON - Unrest continues to grip Ferguson, Missouri as the National Guard struggles to help restore order. Meanwhile, a new poll conducted by the Pew Research Center has found a stark racial divide in reactions to the Michael Brown shooting and the ongoing protests and violence in Ferguson. Judy Woodruff explores multiple perspectives on the situation with Yamiche Alcindor, a USA Today reporter who is on the ground in Ferguson, Carroll Doherty, the director of political research at the Pew Research Center, Gil Alba, a former detective for the New York City Police Department, and Ronald Hampton, a former community relations officer for the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department.
    EBOLA - The death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues to rise, and concern about the strain the epidemic is placing on local resources is growing. The head of Doctors Without Borders has said that the threat of Ebola has also threatened access to basic health care for many people in West Africa. Jeffrey Brown sits down with Dr. Joanne Liu, the international president of Doctors Without Borders, to discuss the outbreak and its impact.
    INDONESIA: SHARIA LAW - In the years after a devastating earthquake and ensuing tsunami, one region of Indonesia has embraced Sharia law. Special correspondent Kira Kay reports from Aceh about the laws in that province and their impact on local life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3667H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4017] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11036H] FERGUSON - Unrest continues to grip Ferguson, Missouri as the National Guard struggles to help restore order. Meanwhile, a new poll conducted by the Pew Research Center has found a stark racial divide in reactions to the Michael Brown shooting and the ongoing protests and violence in Ferguson. Judy Woodruff explores multiple perspectives on the situation with Yamiche Alcindor, a USA Today reporter who is on the ground in Ferguson, Carroll Doherty, the director of political research at the Pew Research Center, Gil Alba, a former detective for the New York City Police Department, and Ronald Hampton, a former community relations officer for the D.C. Metropolitan Police Department.
    EBOLA - The death toll from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues to rise, and concern about the strain the epidemic is placing on local resources is growing. The head of Doctors Without Borders has said that the threat of Ebola has also threatened access to basic health care for many people in West Africa. Jeffrey Brown sits down with Dr. Joanne Liu, the international president of Doctors Without Borders, to discuss the outbreak and its impact.
    INDONESIA: SHARIA LAW - In the years after a devastating earthquake and ensuing tsunami, one region of Indonesia has embraced Sharia law. Special correspondent Kira Kay reports from Aceh about the laws in that province and their impact on local life.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
Tuesday, August 19, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

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    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

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KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

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Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

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KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

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KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

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V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

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KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

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