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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Monday, August 18, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Monday, August 18, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#501] Peace Versus Justice This documentary examines the role of the International Criminal Court in the trial against rebel leader Joseph Kony, whose Lord' Resistance Army (LRA) has spread death and destruction in Uganda, and battled the government of president Museveni, for nearly 20 years now. But what if the victims of these crimes don't want the ICC's version of justice? The film also takes a look at the problems of applying western concepts of justice to other countries and continents. duration 52:55   STEREO
  • 1:00 am
    Autism: Coming of Age When people think of autism, they instinctively think of children. However, in the next 10 to 15 years, an estimated 800,000 children with autism will age out of the school system and transition into adulthood. Then, they will look to ill-prepared state and federal governments for the support services and resources to meet their many needs: a situation autism experts refer to as the "coming tsunami." This documentary provides an inside look at the lives of three adults with autism and includes interviews with their families and support teams. Autism and disability experts from Massachusetts, New York, Washington, Virginia and Pennsylvania also discuss the current system, impending challenges and possible outcomes for the future. duration 57:10   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Great Conversations [#403] Michio Kaku/James Canton Michio Kaku, a leader in the field of theoretical physics, and futurist James Canton discusses Kaku's book Physics of the Future: How Science Will Shape Human Destiny and Our Daily Lives by the Year 2100. duration 56:30   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#5101] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3270] Tavis talks with Charles "Lil Buck" Riley, master of the style of dance known as "jookin'." The dancer who's been called the Baryshnikov of jookin' describes the free-style street dance that's become a sensation. Originally aired on June 27, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    LinkAsia [#260] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 4:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1750] ATROCITIES IN MYANMAR - Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, continues to experience the violent persecution of its minority population of Rohingya Muslims. Muslims are being attacked by mobs of extremist Buddhist factions, despite Buddhist principles of nonviolence. "They refer to the Rohingya as subhuman, but beyond that they actually believe the Rohingya are subhuman," says Matthew Smith, executive director of Fortify Rights, an independent organization to protect and defend human rights, "and I think this is one of the things that make them particularly dangerous." (Originally broadcast April 18, 2014)
    JAMES LEE BURKE - The enormously successful crime novelist James Lee Burke has yet another book climbing the best seller charts. Wayfaring Stranger, his 35th title, was released last month. "A Franciscan told me once," says Burke, "'Don't keep track of the score. The score will take care of itself.'" His detective stories bear the influence of his Roman Catholic boyhood and are full of biblical imagery, the mystery of sin and evil, the struggle for salvation, and a longing for redemption. (Originally broadcast October 11, 2013)
    JANMASHTAMI - On August 17, Hindus observe the birth of Lord Krishna in a 2-day celebration popularly known as Janmashtami. We visited one such celebration at the Rajdhani Mandir Temple in Chantilly, Virginia. "I'm leaving behind my worries and being reminded of God's love," says Nidhi Singh, our guide, "of not feeling defeated by any hardship that I might be facing and getting strength to continue to do my dharma [duty] as Krishna taught." (Originally broadcast August 22, 2008)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Nature [#2801] Echo: An Elephant to Remember Echo, the elephant matriarch, was the subject of many "Nature" films and the leader of a carefully studied herd of elephants in Africa. Last year, she died of natural causes. This film is a look back at this remarkable animal through extraordinary footage and interviews with the researchers that cared for and studied this amazing herd. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    My Wild Affair [#101] The Elephant Who Found A Mom This is the heartbreaking story of Aisha, the baby elephant orphan, and Daphne Sheldrick, the woman who became her human foster parent. Their intense bond reaches a crisis point when Daphne leaves Aisha with a babysitter for a few days to attend her daughter's wedding. Aisha believes she has lost Daphne for good and refuses to eat, leading to her death. Heartbroken, Daphne uses the lessons learned from Aisha's short life to help her save more than 150 orphans over the next 40 years. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Global Voices [#712] Before The Revolution Dan Shadur's brother can't forget the day in November 1978 when he stood on the balcony of his family's apartment in Tehran and watched thousands of demonstrators clash with tanks and soldiers of the Shah's regime. His mother stood behind him, trembling, baby Dan in her arms. The next day, the Israeli embassy ordered the Shadur family, along with thousands of other Israeli citizens, to evacuate the city. The Islamic Revolution had begun. Dan's father stayed behind, and only managed to escape in 1979 with the help of others from the Israeli Embassy and the Mossad. Two years later, he died, leaving nothing but some 8 millimeter film for his sons to remember Tehran by. Director Dan Shadur is 30 - the same age as his father had been that fateful year. He set out to discover the man his father was, and the humble beginnings he imagined his parents had had. Instead, he discovers the extravagant lives of led by many Israelis in pre-Revolution Iran, and of Israel's intimate connection with the Shah's violent and corrupt regime. Using exclusive 8mm footage and rare television archival clips, Before the Revolution offers a glimpse of Israel's dramas in the Middle East, and illuminates the cycles of change in the region, all the way up to the Arab Spring of 2011. The film tracks one of the first great modern first popular uprisings in the Middle East through the people who experienced it firsthand without realizing its historic import or its ongoing consequences. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    Global Voices [#501] Peace Versus Justice This documentary examines the role of the International Criminal Court in the trial against rebel leader Joseph Kony, whose Lord' Resistance Army (LRA) has spread death and destruction in Uganda, and battled the government of president Museveni, for nearly 20 years now. But what if the victims of these crimes don't want the ICC's version of justice? The film also takes a look at the problems of applying western concepts of justice to other countries and continents. duration 52:55   STEREO
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3270] Tavis talks with Charles "Lil Buck" Riley, master of the style of dance known as "jookin'." The dancer who's been called the Baryshnikov of jookin' describes the free-style street dance that's become a sensation. Originally aired on June 27, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3269] Tavis talks with the creator and Emmy-winning writer of Mad Men, Matthew Weiner. Mad Men's showrunner talks about the final season of his award-winning series and his plans after it ends. Originally aired on May 23, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    LinkAsia [#260] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 10:30 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1750] ATROCITIES IN MYANMAR - Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, continues to experience the violent persecution of its minority population of Rohingya Muslims. Muslims are being attacked by mobs of extremist Buddhist factions, despite Buddhist principles of nonviolence. "They refer to the Rohingya as subhuman, but beyond that they actually believe the Rohingya are subhuman," says Matthew Smith, executive director of Fortify Rights, an independent organization to protect and defend human rights, "and I think this is one of the things that make them particularly dangerous." (Originally broadcast April 18, 2014)
    JAMES LEE BURKE - The enormously successful crime novelist James Lee Burke has yet another book climbing the best seller charts. Wayfaring Stranger, his 35th title, was released last month. "A Franciscan told me once," says Burke, "'Don't keep track of the score. The score will take care of itself.'" His detective stories bear the influence of his Roman Catholic boyhood and are full of biblical imagery, the mystery of sin and evil, the struggle for salvation, and a longing for redemption. (Originally broadcast October 11, 2013)
    JANMASHTAMI - On August 17, Hindus observe the birth of Lord Krishna in a 2-day celebration popularly known as Janmashtami. We visited one such celebration at the Rajdhani Mandir Temple in Chantilly, Virginia. "I'm leaving behind my worries and being reminded of God's love," says Nidhi Singh, our guide, "of not feeling defeated by any hardship that I might be facing and getting strength to continue to do my dharma [duty] as Krishna taught." (Originally broadcast August 22, 2008)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 am
    Nature [#2801] Echo: An Elephant to Remember Echo, the elephant matriarch, was the subject of many "Nature" films and the leader of a carefully studied herd of elephants in Africa. Last year, she died of natural causes. This film is a look back at this remarkable animal through extraordinary footage and interviews with the researchers that cared for and studied this amazing herd. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    My Wild Affair [#101] The Elephant Who Found A Mom This is the heartbreaking story of Aisha, the baby elephant orphan, and Daphne Sheldrick, the woman who became her human foster parent. Their intense bond reaches a crisis point when Daphne leaves Aisha with a babysitter for a few days to attend her daughter's wedding. Aisha believes she has lost Daphne for good and refuses to eat, leading to her death. Heartbroken, Daphne uses the lessons learned from Aisha's short life to help her save more than 150 orphans over the next 40 years. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Global Voices [#712] Before The Revolution Dan Shadur's brother can't forget the day in November 1978 when he stood on the balcony of his family's apartment in Tehran and watched thousands of demonstrators clash with tanks and soldiers of the Shah's regime. His mother stood behind him, trembling, baby Dan in her arms. The next day, the Israeli embassy ordered the Shadur family, along with thousands of other Israeli citizens, to evacuate the city. The Islamic Revolution had begun. Dan's father stayed behind, and only managed to escape in 1979 with the help of others from the Israeli Embassy and the Mossad. Two years later, he died, leaving nothing but some 8 millimeter film for his sons to remember Tehran by. Director Dan Shadur is 30 - the same age as his father had been that fateful year. He set out to discover the man his father was, and the humble beginnings he imagined his parents had had. Instead, he discovers the extravagant lives of led by many Israelis in pre-Revolution Iran, and of Israel's intimate connection with the Shah's violent and corrupt regime. Using exclusive 8mm footage and rare television archival clips, Before the Revolution offers a glimpse of Israel's dramas in the Middle East, and illuminates the cycles of change in the region, all the way up to the Arab Spring of 2011. The film tracks one of the first great modern first popular uprisings in the Middle East through the people who experienced it firsthand without realizing its historic import or its ongoing consequences. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#5101] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#10164] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3270] Tavis talks with Charles "Lil Buck" Riley, master of the style of dance known as "jookin'." The dancer who's been called the Baryshnikov of jookin' describes the free-style street dance that's become a sensation. Originally aired on June 27, 2014 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33164H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, no news was good news on Wall Street as a quiet August day ended with a 170-point gain on the Dow. And, you'll never guess how much it costs to raise kids. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11035] FERGUSON - The National Guard has been deployed to Ferguson, Missouri in the latest effort to quell the violence and unrest that erupted following the shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, by a white police officer. The results of a privately conducted autopsy, released today by the attorneys for Brown's family, reveal that the 18-year-old was shot six times. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Yamiche Alcindor, a USA Today reporter who is on the ground in Ferguson. She then discusses the impact on the community with former Ferguson Mayor Brian Fletcher and State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal. EBOLA - Angry Liberian residents stormed an Ebola quarantine center in Monrovia Saturday night. Some charged that those sent to the center had received little care, others believed the Ebola outbreak to be a "hoax." Jeffrey Brown sits down with John Moore, a photographer for Getty Images who has been documenting the outbreak in Monrovia, and witnessed the attack.
    IRAQ - This weekend there were conflicting reports over who was in full control of the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq. The facility was captured by the Islamic State group earlier this month, but Iraqi government troops and Kurdish military forces have attempted to retake it, with U.S. support. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner is on assignment in Iraq. She reports on the latest developments in the region.
    TEACHER LED SCHOOLS - At a school in Boston, teachers have taken charge. Issues such as curriculum, budget and hiring are decided by consensus rather than a principal. John Tulenko of Learning Matters Television has the story.
    HUNGER IN AMERICA - A new report on hunger in the United States, released today by the nonprofit Feeding America, paints a grim picture. Jeffrey Brown is joined by Deborah Flateman, president and CEO of the Maryland Food Bank and a member of Feeding America's board, to examine the study's findings.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33164H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, no news was good news on Wall Street as a quiet August day ended with a 170-point gain on the Dow. And, you'll never guess how much it costs to raise kids. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4016] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#5101] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3666H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11035] FERGUSON - The National Guard has been deployed to Ferguson, Missouri in the latest effort to quell the violence and unrest that erupted following the shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, by a white police officer. The results of a privately conducted autopsy, released today by the attorneys for Brown's family, reveal that the 18-year-old was shot six times. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Yamiche Alcindor, a USA Today reporter who is on the ground in Ferguson. She then discusses the impact on the community with former Ferguson Mayor Brian Fletcher and State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal. EBOLA - Angry Liberian residents stormed an Ebola quarantine center in Monrovia Saturday night. Some charged that those sent to the center had received little care, others believed the Ebola outbreak to be a "hoax." Jeffrey Brown sits down with John Moore, a photographer for Getty Images who has been documenting the outbreak in Monrovia, and witnessed the attack.
    IRAQ - This weekend there were conflicting reports over who was in full control of the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq. The facility was captured by the Islamic State group earlier this month, but Iraqi government troops and Kurdish military forces have attempted to retake it, with U.S. support. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner is on assignment in Iraq. She reports on the latest developments in the region.
    TEACHER LED SCHOOLS - At a school in Boston, teachers have taken charge. Issues such as curriculum, budget and hiring are decided by consensus rather than a principal. John Tulenko of Learning Matters Television has the story.
    HUNGER IN AMERICA - A new report on hunger in the United States, released today by the nonprofit Feeding America, paints a grim picture. Jeffrey Brown is joined by Deborah Flateman, president and CEO of the Maryland Food Bank and a member of Feeding America's board, to examine the study's findings.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3666H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#20171H] (original broadcast date: 8/18/14)
    a rebroadcast of the tribute to Robin Williams.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3666H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3271] Tavis talks with Academy Award-winning actress and director Anjelica Huston. Part of a third generation of Hollywood talent, Huston explains why she decided to write about her unusual upbringing. Originally aired on December 17, 2013 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3666H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#1008H] It Doesn't End Here After traveling over 5,000 miles in 45 days, the Roadtrippers reach Massachusetts for the final week of their journey. There, they meet with Jeremy England, an MIT biophysicist, and Juan Enriquez, the CEO of Biotechnonomy LLC. Change is the topic of discussion with Juan, who tells the Roadtrippers to 'scare the hell' out of themselves sometimes because stagnancy is the enemy of personal growth. Moving onto the last interview of the trip, the Roadtrippers meet with Lydia Villa-Komaroff, an internationally-acclaimed molecular biologist and Chief Scientific Officer at CytonomeST. Lydia discusses the challenges of being a Mexican-American woman in a male-dominated field, and credits her passion for helping her to overcome obstacles. Afterwards, the team heads to the airport where they reflect on their personal growth and future paths before sharing one last group hug. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3666H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11035] FERGUSON - The National Guard has been deployed to Ferguson, Missouri in the latest effort to quell the violence and unrest that erupted following the shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, by a white police officer. The results of a privately conducted autopsy, released today by the attorneys for Brown's family, reveal that the 18-year-old was shot six times. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Yamiche Alcindor, a USA Today reporter who is on the ground in Ferguson. She then discusses the impact on the community with former Ferguson Mayor Brian Fletcher and State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal. EBOLA - Angry Liberian residents stormed an Ebola quarantine center in Monrovia Saturday night. Some charged that those sent to the center had received little care, others believed the Ebola outbreak to be a "hoax." Jeffrey Brown sits down with John Moore, a photographer for Getty Images who has been documenting the outbreak in Monrovia, and witnessed the attack.
    IRAQ - This weekend there were conflicting reports over who was in full control of the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq. The facility was captured by the Islamic State group earlier this month, but Iraqi government troops and Kurdish military forces have attempted to retake it, with U.S. support. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner is on assignment in Iraq. She reports on the latest developments in the region.
    TEACHER LED SCHOOLS - At a school in Boston, teachers have taken charge. Issues such as curriculum, budget and hiring are decided by consensus rather than a principal. John Tulenko of Learning Matters Television has the story.
    HUNGER IN AMERICA - A new report on hunger in the United States, released today by the nonprofit Feeding America, paints a grim picture. Jeffrey Brown is joined by Deborah Flateman, president and CEO of the Maryland Food Bank and a member of Feeding America's board, to examine the study's findings.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3666H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4016] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11035] FERGUSON - The National Guard has been deployed to Ferguson, Missouri in the latest effort to quell the violence and unrest that erupted following the shooting of Michael Brown, an unarmed black teenager, by a white police officer. The results of a privately conducted autopsy, released today by the attorneys for Brown's family, reveal that the 18-year-old was shot six times. Judy Woodruff debriefs with Yamiche Alcindor, a USA Today reporter who is on the ground in Ferguson. She then discusses the impact on the community with former Ferguson Mayor Brian Fletcher and State Senator Maria Chappelle-Nadal. EBOLA - Angry Liberian residents stormed an Ebola quarantine center in Monrovia Saturday night. Some charged that those sent to the center had received little care, others believed the Ebola outbreak to be a "hoax." Jeffrey Brown sits down with John Moore, a photographer for Getty Images who has been documenting the outbreak in Monrovia, and witnessed the attack.
    IRAQ - This weekend there were conflicting reports over who was in full control of the Mosul Dam in northern Iraq. The facility was captured by the Islamic State group earlier this month, but Iraqi government troops and Kurdish military forces have attempted to retake it, with U.S. support. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner is on assignment in Iraq. She reports on the latest developments in the region.
    TEACHER LED SCHOOLS - At a school in Boston, teachers have taken charge. Issues such as curriculum, budget and hiring are decided by consensus rather than a principal. John Tulenko of Learning Matters Television has the story.
    HUNGER IN AMERICA - A new report on hunger in the United States, released today by the nonprofit Feeding America, paints a grim picture. Jeffrey Brown is joined by Deborah Flateman, president and CEO of the Maryland Food Bank and a member of Feeding America's board, to examine the study's findings.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Monday, August 18, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too