Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Sunday, August 17, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Sunday, August 17, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Knee Deep This program follows a culturally diverse group of dedicated senior citizens who are pooling their collective knowledge for a common cause: the environmental health of the Delaware Valley's waterways. The Park Senior Environment Corps is quietly generating scientific data that someday will feed into a global database documenting the long-term health of the world's rivers and streams, and possibly spur changes in the management of water and waste. The documentary also highlights how the volunteer organization prioritized environmental education within their community, particularly with schoolchildren. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 am
    Teaching Channel Presents [#301] Inside Common Core Classrooms We'll begin the new season of Teaching Channel Presents in classrooms where teachers are already integrating the Common Core. From adding and subtracting to fractions and functions, we'll follow students as they explore mathematical reasoning across grade levels. See how the standards change as students advance. And, we'll visit three lively English classes where the Common Core emphasis is on speaking and listening skills. duration 59:00   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Moyers & Company [#332H] Facing Evil with Maya Angelou In this second of 2 programs celebrating the life and work of the late Maya Angelou, Bill Moyers revisits a 1988 documentary in which he and Angelou attended a conference on "Facing Evil," held in the Hill Country of central Texas. Evil was a topic about which Angelou, the victim of childhood rape and virulent racism, had a lot to say. < br>Rape caused her to retreat into silence for 5 years. she said, and was "a dire kind of evil, because rape on the body of a young person more often than not introduces cynicism, and there is nothing quite so tragic as a young cynic, because it means the person has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing. In my case I was saved in that muteness, you see, in the sordida, I was saved. And I was able to draw from human thought, human disappointments and triumphs, enough to triumph myself."
    She recites the lyrics of a song she wrote for Roberta Flack about Angelou's crippled Uncle Willie, who made sure she and others knew their lessons and "left for our generation and generations to come a legacy so rich." She reads from the poetry of African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar as well her own: "There in those pleated faces/I see the auction block/The chains and slavery's coffles/The whip and lash and stock./My fathers speak in voices/That shred my fact and sound/They say, but, sugar, it was our submission/that made your world go round.''
    She tells the conference, "We need the courage to create ourselves daily, to be bodacious enough to create ourselves daily - as Christians, as Jews, as Muslims, as thinking, caring, laughing, loving human beings," she says. I think that the courage to confront evil and turn it by dint of will into something applicable to the development of our evolution, individually and collectively, is exciting, honorable."
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Asia Insight [#202] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5406H] * The police-involved shooting death of an unarmed Missouri teen has sparked 4 days of violent confrontations between law enforcement and protestors in the town of Ferguson. 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed last Saturday while walking with a friend in his grandmother's neighborhood outside St. Louis. Tensions on the street escalated all week and on Wednesday night police used tear gas and stun grenades to try and control crowds. During a brief news conference on Thursday, President Obama urged everyone to remain calm and said it was time for healing on the streets of Ferguson. The Justice Department is now investigating possible civil rights violations surrounding the shooting. Carrie Johnson of NPR has the latest on the investigation into Brown's death and the possible use of excessive force by police in the aftermath of the shooting.
    * The US is stepping up military assistance to Iraqi forces fighting ISIS militants who now call themselves the Islamic State. In addition to the strategic bombing of rebel targets and the dispatch of more than 100 military advisors to northern Iraq, the CIA is supplying weapons to Kurdish fighters who are battling the aggressive militant group. Late Thursday Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki agreed to step down and support Haider al-Abadi, the deputy speaker of the Parliament as his replacement. Maliki had been facing political pressure to relinquish power. Yochi Dreazen of Foreign Policy Magazine updates us on the US mission and explain whether there is a political solution ahead in Iraq.
    * Plus Jeff Zeleny of ABC News examines the reported rift between Hillary Clinton and President Obama over US foreign policy as the former secretary of state considers a possible 2016 run for the White House.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3234H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 5:00 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#205] * Laurie Garrett on the ebola outbreak * David Brooks on President Obama and the Democratic party * John Lithgow discusses his role as King Lear * A look at the film: The Giver * we remember Robin Williams duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 am
    European Journal [#3233] Greece: Suicide Crisis and Depression Romania: Corruption and Intimidation - For decades, Romanian authorities have been fighting against endemic corruption, with increasing success. Now even the president's family has become the focus of investigations. One of the most serious scandals involves President Traian Basescu's brother, who is accused of taking a 250, 000 bribe from a Romanian criminal gang. In return he is alleged to have tried to influence the court investigating the clan - and video evidence has now surfaced. Parliament is demanding Basescu's resignation, saying he knew about the deal. The national anti-corruption directorate is investigating. France: Charm and Arrogance - Familiar scenarios for foreign tourists in Paris: a waiter brings coffee instead of water, or a hotel clerk supposedly can't understand English. Service in France is in need of improvement. France remains a hugely popular tourist destination. Hotel bookings are decreasing year by year, however, especially in the capital Paris. Service there doesn't exactly have the best reputation, while not speaking French can also be a major problem. That's set to change. Voluntary city guides called Paris Greeters accompany small groups of tourists, showing them local life in their own parts of town. At the same time, hotel and restaurant owners in particular are resisting the newly prescribed hospitality. Greece: Crisis and Desperation - Redundancies, bankruptcies, corruption: for years, Greeks have been reading the same headlines. Many can no longer take the constant pressure. The suicide rate in Greece is higher than it's ever been. Desperate pensioners, insolvent bank employees, jobless fathers - many poverty-stricken Greeks are taking their own lives. Government figures cite up to 3,000 suicides a year. Unofficially, the number is three times as high, even though suicide is a taboo topic in Greece. The Orthodox Church still denies a Christian burial to those who take their own lives, leading many families to register the suicides of relatives as accidents. Austria: Remembrance and Humanity - 101-year-old Marko Feingold once again attended the Alpine Peace Crossing this year, commemorating the flight of Jews over the Alps after the Second World War. Every year the Austrian village of Krimml commemorates the exodus of 5,000 Jewish refugees across the Alps in the summer of 1947. They were fleeing postwar anti-Semitism in Europe, and headed for Palestine to find a new home. Marko Feingold, the main organizer back then, takes part in the annual memorial peace hike over the Krimml Tauern pass. Now 101, he survived four concentration camps and is still fighting today for humane refugee policies the world over. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    America Reframed [#206] Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea Once known as the California Riviera, the Salton Sea is now called one of America's worst ecological disasters: a fetid, stagnant, salty lake, that coughs up dead fish and birds by the thousands in frequent die-offs that occur. However, amongst the ruins of this man-made mistake, a few remaining eccentrics (a roadside nudist, a religious folk artist, a Hungarian revolutionary, and real estate speculators) struggle to keep a remodeled version of the original Salton Sea dream alive. Accidentally created by an engineering error in 1905, reworked in the 50's as a world class vacation destination for the rich and famous, suddenly abandoned after a series of hurricanes, floods, and fish die-offs, and finally almost saved by Congressman Sonny Bono, the Salton Sea has a bittersweet past. The film shares these people's stories and their difficulties in keeping their unique community alive, as the nearby cities of Los Angeles and San Diego attempt to take the agricultural water run-off that barely sustains the Salton Sea. While covering the historical, economic, political, and environmental issues that face the Sea, this program offers an offbeat portrait of the peculiar and individualistic people who populate its shores. It is an epic western tale of fantastic real estate ventures and failed boomtowns, inner-city gangs fleeing to white small town America, and the subjective notion of success and failure amidst the ruins of the past. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Alan Alda in Scientific American Frontiers [#1505] Hot Planet - Cold Comfort So you think global warming won't affect you? Wait until the great Atlantic Conveyor shuts down. And find out what's already happening in Alaska. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 8:00 am
    Asia Insight [#203] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1108] Fundamental Differences This week WT asks: is there such thing as a better mouse trap? "Financial Thought Leader" Robert Arnott, chairman of Research Affiliates, says he has created a better alternative to traditional index funds. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Truth About Money with Ric Edelman [#324H] Financial Planner Ric Edelman talks with one investor about the best place to put real estate profits. Plus, where's the best place to invest these days? And Jean Edelman will explain the importance of tuning in to your "inner voice". All that and much more on this edition of The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:30 am
    This American Land [#403] Wilderness Anniversary, Arkansas Oil Pipeline, Climbing Fish Marking the fiftieth anniversary of the Wilderness Act, we explore its origins and success in protecting more than 100 million acres of unspoiled natural wilderness, a distinctly American achievement. There are still many more areas of wild nature that deserve protection, and the Wilderness Act remains an essential law in the cause of conservation. In March, 2013, a rupture in a buried oil pipeline surprised suburban homeowners in Mayflower, Arkansas by flooding their streets with crude oil. Many of them didn't even know there was a pipeline under their yards. To find out more about this event, we offer a two-part investigative story co-produced with Inside Climate News, a Pulitzer Prize-winning reporting unit. Researchers study a type of Goby fish in Hawaii that climbs up steep waterfalls to reach its freshwater spawning areas, an amazing story of adaptation and evolution over time. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 10:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3234H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5406H] * The police-involved shooting death of an unarmed Missouri teen has sparked 4 days of violent confrontations between law enforcement and protestors in the town of Ferguson. 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed last Saturday while walking with a friend in his grandmother's neighborhood outside St. Louis. Tensions on the street escalated all week and on Wednesday night police used tear gas and stun grenades to try and control crowds. During a brief news conference on Thursday, President Obama urged everyone to remain calm and said it was time for healing on the streets of Ferguson. The Justice Department is now investigating possible civil rights violations surrounding the shooting. Carrie Johnson of NPR has the latest on the investigation into Brown's death and the possible use of excessive force by police in the aftermath of the shooting.
    * The US is stepping up military assistance to Iraqi forces fighting ISIS militants who now call themselves the Islamic State. In addition to the strategic bombing of rebel targets and the dispatch of more than 100 military advisors to northern Iraq, the CIA is supplying weapons to Kurdish fighters who are battling the aggressive militant group. Late Thursday Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki agreed to step down and support Haider al-Abadi, the deputy speaker of the Parliament as his replacement. Maliki had been facing political pressure to relinquish power. Yochi Dreazen of Foreign Policy Magazine updates us on the US mission and explain whether there is a political solution ahead in Iraq.
    * Plus Jeff Zeleny of ABC News examines the reported rift between Hillary Clinton and President Obama over US foreign policy as the former secretary of state considers a possible 2016 run for the White House.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#139H] Back to School: Education Policy, Rim Fire Restoration, Remembering Robin Williams
    Back to School: Education Policy
    It's not just kids who are getting ready to hit the books. California schools will be put to the test this year as well, with two major policy changes. First, California's new funding formula, devised by Gov. Jerry Brown puts local districts in control of how they spend education funding and provides more money for low income students and English learners. Also, the national Common Core curriculum takes full effect this school year, changing how students are taught and tested.

    Guests:
    • Michael Kirst, California State School Board President
    • Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle Education Reporter

    Rim Fire Restoration
    It's been a year since the rim fire scorched 400 square miles in Yosemite and surrounding areas. It was the largest fire to ever burn in the Sierra Nevada. This week, a hunter pleaded not guilty to charges that he started it with an illegal campfire. KQED Science Reporter Lauren Sommer recently visited the area to see first-hand. KQED Newsroom's Thuy Vu sat down with her to discuss the lingering impact and current restoration efforts.

    Guests:
    • Lauren Sommer, KQED Science Reporter

    Further Reporting:
    Yosemite Opens Areas Closed After Last Summer's Huge Rim Fire
    Drought Could Hamper Forest Recovery After Rim Fire

    Remembering Robin Williams: Interview with Frank Zamacona
    As the world struggles to come to grips with the death of Robin Williams, here in the Bay Area we mourn the loss of one of our own. Williams helped to establish and support San Francisco as a comedy capitol in the 1980's with a thriving club scene that included the Holy City Zoo, The Other Café and The Punch Line. During the 1980s and 90s, KQED produced 10 seasons of a popular comedy series called "Comedy Tonight." It featured performances by up and comers Dana Carvey, Whoopi Goldberg, Ellen Degeneres and others. KQED Newsroom's Scott Shafer sat down with former "Comedy Tonight" Producer Frank Zamacona to reminisce about Robin Williams and that golden era of comedy in the city.

    Further Reporting:
    Robin Williams Suffered From Parkinson's Disease, Wife Says

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 11:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#332H] Facing Evil with Maya Angelou In this second of 2 programs celebrating the life and work of the late Maya Angelou, Bill Moyers revisits a 1988 documentary in which he and Angelou attended a conference on "Facing Evil," held in the Hill Country of central Texas. Evil was a topic about which Angelou, the victim of childhood rape and virulent racism, had a lot to say. < br>Rape caused her to retreat into silence for 5 years. she said, and was "a dire kind of evil, because rape on the body of a young person more often than not introduces cynicism, and there is nothing quite so tragic as a young cynic, because it means the person has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing. In my case I was saved in that muteness, you see, in the sordida, I was saved. And I was able to draw from human thought, human disappointments and triumphs, enough to triumph myself."
    She recites the lyrics of a song she wrote for Roberta Flack about Angelou's crippled Uncle Willie, who made sure she and others knew their lessons and "left for our generation and generations to come a legacy so rich." She reads from the poetry of African-American poet Paul Laurence Dunbar as well her own: "There in those pleated faces/I see the auction block/The chains and slavery's coffles/The whip and lash and stock./My fathers speak in voices/That shred my fact and sound/They say, but, sugar, it was our submission/that made your world go round.''
    She tells the conference, "We need the courage to create ourselves daily, to be bodacious enough to create ourselves daily - as Christians, as Jews, as Muslims, as thinking, caring, laughing, loving human beings," she says. I think that the courage to confront evil and turn it by dint of will into something applicable to the development of our evolution, individually and collectively, is exciting, honorable."
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1750] ATROCITIES IN MYANMAR - Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, continues to experience the violent persecution of its minority population of Rohingya Muslims. Muslims are being attacked by mobs of extremist Buddhist factions, despite Buddhist principles of nonviolence. "They refer to the Rohingya as subhuman, but beyond that they actually believe the Rohingya are subhuman," says Matthew Smith, executive director of Fortify Rights, an independent organization to protect and defend human rights, "and I think this is one of the things that make them particularly dangerous." (Originally broadcast April 18, 2014)
    JAMES LEE BURKE - The enormously successful crime novelist James Lee Burke has yet another book climbing the best seller charts. Wayfaring Stranger, his 35th title, was released last month. "A Franciscan told me once," says Burke, "'Don't keep track of the score. The score will take care of itself.'" His detective stories bear the influence of his Roman Catholic boyhood and are full of biblical imagery, the mystery of sin and evil, the struggle for salvation, and a longing for redemption. (Originally broadcast October 11, 2013)
    JANMASHTAMI - On August 17, Hindus observe the birth of Lord Krishna in a 2-day celebration popularly known as Janmashtami. We visited one such celebration at the Rajdhani Mandir Temple in Chantilly, Virginia. "I'm leaving behind my worries and being reminded of God's love," says Nidhi Singh, our guide, "of not feeling defeated by any hardship that I might be facing and getting strength to continue to do my dharma [duty] as Krishna taught." (Originally broadcast August 22, 2008)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:30 pm
    Alan Alda in Scientific American Frontiers [#1505] Hot Planet - Cold Comfort So you think global warming won't affect you? Wait until the great Atlantic Conveyor shuts down. And find out what's already happening in Alaska. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 1:00 pm
    Miller Center's American Forum [#2208H] Stokely Carmichael, Freedom Summer 50 Years Later Historian Peniel Joseph on his new biography of legendary radical African American Civil Rights activist Stokely Carmichael - who launched the "Black Power" movement in defiance of the traditional civil rights leadership in the 1960s and played a crucial part in the dangerous mobilization in Mississippi during Freedom Summer 1964 that became a pivot point in American history. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1301] Myanmar Megan McCormick starts her journey in Yangon with a visit to Shwedagon Pagoda, the most revered Buddhist temple in Myanmar. Next she visits Inle Lake and then heads to the Shan Palace in the town of Hsipaw, where she uncovers a centuries-old tribal rivalry. Megan travels by train to Mandalay to visit the golden Mahamuni Buddha and to try her hand at puppetry. She makes her way to the Chin State and then on to Bagan, once the capital city. Megan's last stop is the Rahkine State where she boards a boat to Ngapali Beach, the ultimate beach destination. duration 58:04   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 3:00 pm
    Nature [#2801] Echo: An Elephant to Remember Echo, the elephant matriarch, was the subject of many "Nature" films and the leader of a carefully studied herd of elephants in Africa. Last year, she died of natural causes. This film is a look back at this remarkable animal through extraordinary footage and interviews with the researchers that cared for and studied this amazing herd. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    Hawking Stephen Hawking is one of the most recognizable people on the planet, a superstar of the scientific world. But although Hawking is an iconic figure, who is the man behind the image? In this film Hawking gives us a rare insight onto his life, both past and present. This is a man whose mind soars beyond the ordinary but who is trapped inside a body he can barely move. This documentary presents the story of one of the most remarkable minds of the modern age. duration 55:31   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Out on a Limb This program explores the evolution of prosthetics and the exciting advancements being made at the intersection of neuroscience, engineering and robotics. A science story and a human story, this documentary shows the impact of this transformative science, as revolutionary prosthetics move from the lab to the bodies of amputees, and particularly to children with limb loss, who stand to benefit the most. duration 57:26   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#200H] Included: Amid decades of declining museum attendance rates, which are especially low among young people, NewsHour Weekend follows one group aiming to recruit a new generation of museum-goers by creating a highly interactive, unconventional museum experience. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#139H] Back to School: Education Policy, Rim Fire Restoration, Remembering Robin Williams
    Back to School: Education Policy
    It's not just kids who are getting ready to hit the books. California schools will be put to the test this year as well, with two major policy changes. First, California's new funding formula, devised by Gov. Jerry Brown puts local districts in control of how they spend education funding and provides more money for low income students and English learners. Also, the national Common Core curriculum takes full effect this school year, changing how students are taught and tested.

    Guests:
    • Michael Kirst, California State School Board President
    • Jill Tucker, San Francisco Chronicle Education Reporter

    Rim Fire Restoration
    It's been a year since the rim fire scorched 400 square miles in Yosemite and surrounding areas. It was the largest fire to ever burn in the Sierra Nevada. This week, a hunter pleaded not guilty to charges that he started it with an illegal campfire. KQED Science Reporter Lauren Sommer recently visited the area to see first-hand. KQED Newsroom's Thuy Vu sat down with her to discuss the lingering impact and current restoration efforts.

    Guests:
    • Lauren Sommer, KQED Science Reporter

    Further Reporting:
    Yosemite Opens Areas Closed After Last Summer's Huge Rim Fire
    Drought Could Hamper Forest Recovery After Rim Fire

    Remembering Robin Williams: Interview with Frank Zamacona
    As the world struggles to come to grips with the death of Robin Williams, here in the Bay Area we mourn the loss of one of our own. Williams helped to establish and support San Francisco as a comedy capitol in the 1980's with a thriving club scene that included the Holy City Zoo, The Other Café and The Punch Line. During the 1980s and 90s, KQED produced 10 seasons of a popular comedy series called "Comedy Tonight." It featured performances by up and comers Dana Carvey, Whoopi Goldberg, Ellen Degeneres and others. KQED Newsroom's Scott Shafer sat down with former "Comedy Tonight" Producer Frank Zamacona to reminisce about Robin Williams and that golden era of comedy in the city.

    Further Reporting:
    Robin Williams Suffered From Parkinson's Disease, Wife Says

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:00 pm
    Global Voices [#712] Before The Revolution Dan Shadur's brother can't forget the day in November 1978 when he stood on the balcony of his family's apartment in Tehran and watched thousands of demonstrators clash with tanks and soldiers of the Shah's regime. His mother stood behind him, trembling, baby Dan in her arms. The next day, the Israeli embassy ordered the Shadur family, along with thousands of other Israeli citizens, to evacuate the city. The Islamic Revolution had begun. Dan's father stayed behind, and only managed to escape in 1979 with the help of others from the Israeli Embassy and the Mossad. Two years later, he died, leaving nothing but some 8 millimeter film for his sons to remember Tehran by. Director Dan Shadur is 30 - the same age as his father had been that fateful year. He set out to discover the man his father was, and the humble beginnings he imagined his parents had had. Instead, he discovers the extravagant lives of led by many Israelis in pre-Revolution Iran, and of Israel's intimate connection with the Shah's violent and corrupt regime. Using exclusive 8mm footage and rare television archival clips, Before the Revolution offers a glimpse of Israel's dramas in the Middle East, and illuminates the cycles of change in the region, all the way up to the Arab Spring of 2011. The film tracks one of the first great modern first popular uprisings in the Middle East through the people who experienced it firsthand without realizing its historic import or its ongoing consequences. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 pm
    Global Voices [#501] Peace Versus Justice This documentary examines the role of the International Criminal Court in the trial against rebel leader Joseph Kony, whose Lord' Resistance Army (LRA) has spread death and destruction in Uganda, and battled the government of president Museveni, for nearly 20 years now. But what if the victims of these crimes don't want the ICC's version of justice? The film also takes a look at the problems of applying western concepts of justice to other countries and continents. duration 52:55   STEREO
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#2801] Echo: An Elephant to Remember Echo, the elephant matriarch, was the subject of many "Nature" films and the leader of a carefully studied herd of elephants in Africa. Last year, she died of natural causes. This film is a look back at this remarkable animal through extraordinary footage and interviews with the researchers that cared for and studied this amazing herd. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    My Wild Affair [#101] The Elephant Who Found A Mom This is the heartbreaking story of Aisha, the baby elephant orphan, and Daphne Sheldrick, the woman who became her human foster parent. Their intense bond reaches a crisis point when Daphne leaves Aisha with a babysitter for a few days to attend her daughter's wedding. Aisha believes she has lost Daphne for good and refuses to eat, leading to her death. Heartbroken, Daphne uses the lessons learned from Aisha's short life to help her save more than 150 orphans over the next 40 years. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 11:00 pm
    Global Voices [#712] Before The Revolution Dan Shadur's brother can't forget the day in November 1978 when he stood on the balcony of his family's apartment in Tehran and watched thousands of demonstrators clash with tanks and soldiers of the Shah's regime. His mother stood behind him, trembling, baby Dan in her arms. The next day, the Israeli embassy ordered the Shadur family, along with thousands of other Israeli citizens, to evacuate the city. The Islamic Revolution had begun. Dan's father stayed behind, and only managed to escape in 1979 with the help of others from the Israeli Embassy and the Mossad. Two years later, he died, leaving nothing but some 8 millimeter film for his sons to remember Tehran by. Director Dan Shadur is 30 - the same age as his father had been that fateful year. He set out to discover the man his father was, and the humble beginnings he imagined his parents had had. Instead, he discovers the extravagant lives of led by many Israelis in pre-Revolution Iran, and of Israel's intimate connection with the Shah's violent and corrupt regime. Using exclusive 8mm footage and rare television archival clips, Before the Revolution offers a glimpse of Israel's dramas in the Middle East, and illuminates the cycles of change in the region, all the way up to the Arab Spring of 2011. The film tracks one of the first great modern first popular uprisings in the Middle East through the people who experienced it firsthand without realizing its historic import or its ongoing consequences. duration 56:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    Global Voices [#501] Peace Versus Justice This documentary examines the role of the International Criminal Court in the trial against rebel leader Joseph Kony, whose Lord' Resistance Army (LRA) has spread death and destruction in Uganda, and battled the government of president Museveni, for nearly 20 years now. But what if the victims of these crimes don't want the ICC's version of justice? The film also takes a look at the problems of applying western concepts of justice to other countries and continents. duration 52:55   STEREO
Sunday, August 17, 2014

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

    • KQET Off Air Sun 8/03 morning

      (DT25.1, 25.2, 25.3) KQET DT25 was off the air for a portion of Sunday morning, due to the transmitter taking a power hit. The signal has been restored. Most receivers should have re-acquired our signal once it returned, but a few Over the Air viewers may need to do a rescan in order to restore […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too