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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, August 9, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 9, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11029] IRAQ STRIKES - US airstrikes hit Iraq today for the first time since American troops departed in late 2011. The strikes were launched in response to Islamist militants' advance in the north, which has forced religious minority groups to flee. The US has also commenced air drops of humanitarian aid to these refugees. Hari Sreenivasan reports on the situation.
    MARKET BASKET - Employees and customers alike have been drawn into a family feud between the owners of Market Basket, a New England grocery store chain. Economics correspondent Paul Solman has the story as part of his on-going reporting on "Making Sen$e" of financial news.
    SHIELDS & BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze this week's top stories.
    FREEDOM SCHOOLS - It has been 50 years since Freedom Summer galvanized the Civil Rights Movement by registering voters in Mississippi. There was also a focus on the next generation among the movement's college age volunteers. They created a network of "Freedom Schools" to teach children the value of their own history. This summer, these schools are being re-created to teach the history of civil rights to young people today.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33158] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3264] Tavis concludes his two-part visit with comedian and filmmaker Mel Brooks. The filmmaking legend has stories to tell and recounts a few in the conclusion of his conversation. (Originally aired on May 16, 2014) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Time Scanners [#101H] Egyptian Pyramids The team travels to Egypt to scan the pyramids - the tombs of the mighty pharaohs - to find out how the necropolis evolved from simple mud-brick structures to the most impressive buildings in the ancient world. They use their cutting-edge laser technology to scan Djoser's Step Pyramid at Saqqara, Meidum's collapsed pyramid, the mysterious Bent Pyramid at Dashur and the famous Great Pyramid at Giza. duration 53:31   SRND51 TVPG
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1749] JORDAN'S SYRIAN REFUGEES - More than 9 million Syrians have fled their country in what the UN has called the "greatest humanitarian catastrophe of modern times." Faith-based groups - Catholic, Jewish, Muslim, Orthodox, Mennonite, and more - in Jordan, home now to 2 large Syrian refugee camps, are doing what they can to help. "Behind each of these wonderful people is a life that is completely disrupted. We see God in all of these people. We see that these are brothers and sisters like us," says Catholic Relief Services president Carolyn Woo. (Originally broadcast January 24, 2014.)
    THE DECEMBER PROJECT - Sara Davidson is a best-selling writer and journalist who confesses she felt completely unprepared to face the reality of her own mortality. In 2009, she met Jewish Renewal founder Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi. They spent every Friday together for 2 years discussing what the spiritual teacher believed helps one prepare for death. The rabbi died this summer on July 3 at the age of 89. Their conversations culminated in Davidson's book The December Project, named for what Reb Zalman referred to as the December of life. "When you feel you're coming to the end of your tour of duty, what is the spiritual work of that time," he asked, "and how do we prepare for the mystery?" (Originally broadcast May 2, 2014.)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1107] Greatest Financial Challenges This week features Jonathan Clements and Jason Zweig, two top personal finance journalists both now at The Wall Street Journal, who tackle the three greatest financial challenges facing Americans. Guests: Jonathan Clements, Columnist, The Wall Street Journal; Jason Zweig, Columnist "The Intelligent Investor," The Wall Street Journal. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2311H] Becoming Papa - a Look at a groundbreaking program for men in Rio De Janeiro's favelas to stem the tide of violence and promote healthy relationships. (originally airdate: 5/24/14) duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#308] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Mark Twain [#102] Part Two In episode two, Burns explores the other side of the writer - an American icon who, through tragedy and bad financial decisions, falls hard with failure. In contrast to the wildly successful Twain, Clemens is an inept businessman who squanders his fortunes on pipe dream patents and bad investments. Clemens turns to the lecture circuit and tours extensively, leaving behind his beloved Hartford home and, often, his family, to pay off his creditors. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1749] JORDAN'S SYRIAN REFUGEES - More than 9 million Syrians have fled their country in what the UN has called the "greatest humanitarian catastrophe of modern times." Faith-based groups - Catholic, Jewish, Muslim, Orthodox, Mennonite, and more - in Jordan, home now to 2 large Syrian refugee camps, are doing what they can to help. "Behind each of these wonderful people is a life that is completely disrupted. We see God in all of these people. We see that these are brothers and sisters like us," says Catholic Relief Services president Carolyn Woo. (Originally broadcast January 24, 2014.)
    THE DECEMBER PROJECT - Sara Davidson is a best-selling writer and journalist who confesses she felt completely unprepared to face the reality of her own mortality. In 2009, she met Jewish Renewal founder Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi. They spent every Friday together for 2 years discussing what the spiritual teacher believed helps one prepare for death. The rabbi died this summer on July 3 at the age of 89. Their conversations culminated in Davidson's book The December Project, named for what Reb Zalman referred to as the December of life. "When you feel you're coming to the end of your tour of duty, what is the spiritual work of that time," he asked, "and how do we prepare for the mystery?" (Originally broadcast May 2, 2014.)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#331H] Going Home with Maya Angelou Over the years and on several occasions, Bill Moyers interviewed Maya Angelou, the legendary author who died in late May. In this first of two programs celebrating her extraordinary life and legacy, Moyers revisits an episode from his 1982 series "Creativity" in which he and Angelou returned to the small town of Stamps, Arkansas, where she spent much of her childhood.
    Walking with Moyers, she remembers a place where she was "terribly hurt - and vastly loved." Stamps, Arkansas, was deeply segregated, divided by railroad tracks that split the town into black and white. "This was more or less a no man's land here. If you were black you never felt really safe when you simply crossed the railroad tracks," she says. "And I used to have to walk over here. Oh gosh, I hated it. I had no protection at all over there. I had an idea of protection on this side. I had my grandmother on this side. I had the church, my uncle, and all my people were on this side. So I had an idea of protection, but there I would be all alone and I loathed it, crossing those railroad tracks." Angelou, who had been traumatized by rape at the age of seven-and-a-half and did not speak for several years, found her voice again with the help of a family friend, Mrs. Flowers, who "told me poetry was music written for the human voice" and encouraged her to read aloud. The great writers she read, the music she heard in church, and the scars of racial discrimination guided her toward the writing career that made her famous.
    "I am a writer and Stamps must remain for me in that nebulous, unreal reality, because I'm a poet and I have to draw from these shadows, these densities, these phantasmagorias for my poetry," Angelou tells Moyers. "I don't want it to become a place on the map, because the truth is you never can leave home. You take it with you everywhere you go."
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#259] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    This American Land [#402] Owyhee Canyonlands, Sustainable Alaskan Village, Algae Power, Fungi Fuel Much of Oregon is a desert; and in the dry, remote southeastern corner of the state there's a wild and captivating canyon landscape carved by the Owyhee River. It's been described as the largest intact, unprotected stretch of the American West, but it needs more protection from development pressure, including mining. A robust campaign for wilderness designation is making progress. We travel to a remote Alaskan village, Igiugig, where young native Alaskans are adopting new technologies and green ethics to build a healthy, sustainable future while keeping true to their traditions. With another report on emerging biofuels, we learn about new advances in converting algae into a wide range of useful products, including oil, growing the algae with by-products from corn ethanol distilleries. We meet a scientist in Montana who searches the globe for botanical specimens, discovering fungi and bacteria in the tissues of some plants that can be converted into a diesel-like fuel. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5405H] The Obama administration is considering airstrikes in Iraq to help rescue tens of thousands of religious minorities who are stranded on mountaintops after fleeing the militant group ISIS according to a report in The New York Times. The White House would not confirm the report on Thursday but did say the situation in Iraq was on the verge of becoming a "humanitarian catastrophe." In recent weeks fighters from the Islamic State have seized control of the country's largest dam, the water supply and main electricity source. Helene Cooper of The New York Times broke the story and will join us to report on the options the US is considering to get humanitarian aid to displaced Iraqis, stop the aggressive assault by ISIS, and deal with the failures of Iraq's political leaders.
    * During this week's US-Africa Summit in Washington, DC, President Obama pushed to expand trade and hailed "a new emerging Africa" rich with US business opportunities. Nearly 50 heads of state attended the three-day conference where more than $33 billion in US public and private investment was pledged to the continent. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will explain how the US hopes to expand its ties with Africa which is home to 6 of the world's fastest-growing economies. Gwen takes a closer look at the issues that were eclipsed at this week's conference including terrorism, corruption and the Ebola outbreak in this week's Gwen's Take.
    * Plus, Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report will have analysis of the latest public opinion polls that show Americans remain frustrated with Congress, the president, and their own struggle to recover from the financial meltdown of 2008; and she will explain how these issues may factor into the midterm elections.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#138H] Gavin Newsom Interview, State of Bay Area Arts, Legislative Updates
    Interview with Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom
    As Colorado and Washington forge ahead with a newly legal marijuana industry, recent polls show a growing number of Americans support legalizing pot. Four years ago, California voters rejected a statewide ballot measure to legalize recreational marijuana use here. But plans are underway to put the question before voters again in 2016. Gov. Jerry Brown opposes the idea. But Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom is chairing a statewide task force to study the issue, and he spoke to Thuy Vu about it.

    Further Reporting:
    More marijuana coverage

    State of the Arts in the Bay Area and Beyond
    This week the recently merged Sacramento Philharmonic and Opera announced they're scrapping their upcoming seasons due to financial distress, leaving the capital city without an active symphony orchestra for the first time in 17 years. Earlier this year, San Jose Repertory Theatre filed for bankruptcy and San Francisco's Intersection for the Arts, the city's oldest alternative arts organization, scaled back operations significantly and furloughed staff. Our panel explores the reasons some companies struggle while others thrive in a turbulent economic climate.

    Guests:
    • Tom DeCaigny, Cultural Affairs Director, San Francisco Arts Commission
    • Marc Bamuthi Joseph, Director of Performing Arts, YBCA
    • Rebecca Ratzkin, Senior Consultant, WolfBrown

    Further Reporting:
    San Jose Rep Announces Closure

    Legislative Update On Assisted Living Reforms, Water Bond, Cap-and-Trade
    The number of assisted living facilities has boomed in the last decade, but with little regulation or oversight. KQED News Health Reporter April Dembosky reports on a package of bills the legislature is considering that would reform the industry.

    Also, lawmakers tackle a controversial water bond and California's cap-and-trade program. A report from KQED Sacramento Bureau Chief Scott Detrow.

    Further Reporting:
    Cap and Trade Faces First Major Political Test
    A Walk Through Assisted Living Facilities in California

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17220H] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2322H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3233H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#204] * Iraq update with Dexter Filkins of The New Yorker * Discussion about the Ebola virus outbreak with Jim Yong Kim, President of the World Bank * Africa Summit * Mike Allen of Politico * The Nixon Tapes with Douglas Brinkley * James Cameron on his latest film: Deepsea Challenge 3-D duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#331H] Going Home with Maya Angelou Over the years and on several occasions, Bill Moyers interviewed Maya Angelou, the legendary author who died in late May. In this first of two programs celebrating her extraordinary life and legacy, Moyers revisits an episode from his 1982 series "Creativity" in which he and Angelou returned to the small town of Stamps, Arkansas, where she spent much of her childhood.
    Walking with Moyers, she remembers a place where she was "terribly hurt - and vastly loved." Stamps, Arkansas, was deeply segregated, divided by railroad tracks that split the town into black and white. "This was more or less a no man's land here. If you were black you never felt really safe when you simply crossed the railroad tracks," she says. "And I used to have to walk over here. Oh gosh, I hated it. I had no protection at all over there. I had an idea of protection on this side. I had my grandmother on this side. I had the church, my uncle, and all my people were on this side. So I had an idea of protection, but there I would be all alone and I loathed it, crossing those railroad tracks." Angelou, who had been traumatized by rape at the age of seven-and-a-half and did not speak for several years, found her voice again with the help of a family friend, Mrs. Flowers, who "told me poetry was music written for the human voice" and encouraged her to read aloud. The great writers she read, the music she heard in church, and the scars of racial discrimination guided her toward the writing career that made her famous.
    "I am a writer and Stamps must remain for me in that nebulous, unreal reality, because I'm a poet and I have to draw from these shadows, these densities, these phantasmagorias for my poetry," Angelou tells Moyers. "I don't want it to become a place on the map, because the truth is you never can leave home. You take it with you everywhere you go."
    duration 24:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1749] JORDAN'S SYRIAN REFUGEES - More than 9 million Syrians have fled their country in what the UN has called the "greatest humanitarian catastrophe of modern times." Faith-based groups - Catholic, Jewish, Muslim, Orthodox, Mennonite, and more - in Jordan, home now to 2 large Syrian refugee camps, are doing what they can to help. "Behind each of these wonderful people is a life that is completely disrupted. We see God in all of these people. We see that these are brothers and sisters like us," says Catholic Relief Services president Carolyn Woo. (Originally broadcast January 24, 2014.)
    THE DECEMBER PROJECT - Sara Davidson is a best-selling writer and journalist who confesses she felt completely unprepared to face the reality of her own mortality. In 2009, she met Jewish Renewal founder Rabbi Zalman Schachter-Shalomi. They spent every Friday together for 2 years discussing what the spiritual teacher believed helps one prepare for death. The rabbi died this summer on July 3 at the age of 89. Their conversations culminated in Davidson's book The December Project, named for what Reb Zalman referred to as the December of life. "When you feel you're coming to the end of your tour of duty, what is the spiritual work of that time," he asked, "and how do we prepare for the mystery?" (Originally broadcast May 2, 2014.)
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#601H] Amateur Rocketeers/Edible Insects Meet amateur rocket builders who are striving to reach the edge of space with their home-made rockets.Then get a different perspective on nature with photographer Simon Christen who shares his passion for observing the environment through time-lapse photography. Finally, take a bite into the latest food craze and cook with bug-eating enthusiasts who believe that insects are a smarter alternative to more traditional kinds of meat. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#332] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    G-Man: The Rise and Fall of Melvin Purvis Melvin Purvis skyrocketed to fame in the 1930s as the leader of the FBI team that took down gangsters John Dillinger, "Baby Face" Nelson and "Pretty Boy" Floyd. This program explores the complicated relationship between Purvis and FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, the man who some have said was responsible not only for Purvis' meteoric rise, but also his rapid descent back into obscurity. duration 56:40   STEREO TV14
  • 3:00 pm
    Mind Over Murder A troubled youth opens fire in a crowded upscale department store. A pregnant woman is the victim of a heinous murder. Answering an ad for a slave, a man is kept captive and subjected to sadistic torture. These are not fictional scenarios, but actual crimes. In this program, an FBI-trained criminal profiler demonstrates how behavioral research can team with old school detective work to get inside the criminal mind to solve or even prevent crimes like these. duration 57:48   STEREO TV14-VL
  • 4:00 pm
    POV [#2707H] 15 to Life: Kenneth's Story Does sentencing a teenager to life without parole serve our society well? The United States is the only country in the world that routinely condemns children to die in prison. This is the story of one of those children, now a young man, seeking a second chance in Florida. At age 15, Kenneth Young received four consecutive life sentences for a series of armed robberies. Imprisoned for more than a decade, he believed he would die behind bars. Now a US Supreme Court decision could set him free. This film follows Young's struggle for redemption, revealing a justice system with thousands of young people serving sentences intended for society's most dangerous criminals. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Ninoy Aquino and the Rise of People Power Benigno S. "Ninoy" Aquino II was the boy wonder of Philippine politics until the object of his criticism, Ferdinand Marcos, threw him into prison. There Aquino became a deeply reflective and spiritual person who changed the course of history. Where Gandhi used non-violence to drive out the colonizer, and Dr. King used it to fight for civil rights, Aquino adapted nonviolence to overthrowing national dictatorships. The Philippine uprising in the wake of his 1983 assassination began a global wave of pro-democracy movements that continue today. duration 56:44   STEREO TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#197H] Included: With more than a billion people lacking access to water - and that number is expected to double in about a decade - the UN says water scarcity will be one of the biggest global crises of the 21st century. NewsHour Weekend speaks with an expert about water shortages around the world and the investments companies are making to get ahead of the problem. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5405H] The Obama administration is considering airstrikes in Iraq to help rescue tens of thousands of religious minorities who are stranded on mountaintops after fleeing the militant group ISIS according to a report in The New York Times. The White House would not confirm the report on Thursday but did say the situation in Iraq was on the verge of becoming a "humanitarian catastrophe." In recent weeks fighters from the Islamic State have seized control of the country's largest dam, the water supply and main electricity source. Helene Cooper of The New York Times broke the story and will join us to report on the options the US is considering to get humanitarian aid to displaced Iraqis, stop the aggressive assault by ISIS, and deal with the failures of Iraq's political leaders.
    * During this week's US-Africa Summit in Washington, DC, President Obama pushed to expand trade and hailed "a new emerging Africa" rich with US business opportunities. Nearly 50 heads of state attended the three-day conference where more than $33 billion in US public and private investment was pledged to the continent. Doyle McManus of the Los Angeles Times will explain how the US hopes to expand its ties with Africa which is home to 6 of the world's fastest-growing economies. Gwen takes a closer look at the issues that were eclipsed at this week's conference including terrorism, corruption and the Ebola outbreak in this week's Gwen's Take.
    * Plus, Amy Walter of The Cook Political Report will have analysis of the latest public opinion polls that show Americans remain frustrated with Congress, the president, and their own struggle to recover from the financial meltdown of 2008; and she will explain how these issues may factor into the midterm elections.
    duration 24:10   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#138H] Gavin Newsom Interview, State of Bay Area Arts, Legislative Updates
    Interview with Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom
    As Colorado and Washington forge ahead with a newly legal marijuana industry, recent polls show a growing number of Americans support legalizing pot. Four years ago, California voters rejected a statewide ballot measure to legalize recreational marijuana use here. But plans are underway to put the question before voters again in 2016. Gov. Jerry Brown opposes the idea. But Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom is chairing a statewide task force to study the issue, and he spoke to Thuy Vu about it.

    Further Reporting:
    More marijuana coverage

    State of the Arts in the Bay Area and Beyond
    This week the recently merged Sacramento Philharmonic and Opera announced they're scrapping their upcoming seasons due to financial distress, leaving the capital city without an active symphony orchestra for the first time in 17 years. Earlier this year, San Jose Repertory Theatre filed for bankruptcy and San Francisco's Intersection for the Arts, the city's oldest alternative arts organization, scaled back operations significantly and furloughed staff. Our panel explores the reasons some companies struggle while others thrive in a turbulent economic climate.

    Guests:
    • Tom DeCaigny, Cultural Affairs Director, San Francisco Arts Commission
    • Marc Bamuthi Joseph, Director of Performing Arts, YBCA
    • Rebecca Ratzkin, Senior Consultant, WolfBrown

    Further Reporting:
    San Jose Rep Announces Closure

    Legislative Update On Assisted Living Reforms, Water Bond, Cap-and-Trade
    The number of assisted living facilities has boomed in the last decade, but with little regulation or oversight. KQED News Health Reporter April Dembosky reports on a package of bills the legislature is considering that would reform the industry.

    Also, lawmakers tackle a controversial water bond and California's cap-and-trade program. A report from KQED Sacramento Bureau Chief Scott Detrow.

    Further Reporting:
    Cap and Trade Faces First Major Political Test
    A Walk Through Assisted Living Facilities in California

    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#601H] Amateur Rocketeers/Edible Insects Meet amateur rocket builders who are striving to reach the edge of space with their home-made rockets.Then get a different perspective on nature with photographer Simon Christen who shares his passion for observing the environment through time-lapse photography. Finally, take a bite into the latest food craze and cook with bug-eating enthusiasts who believe that insects are a smarter alternative to more traditional kinds of meat. duration 26:21   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1318] Globe Trekker Special: Planet of the Apes Our Trekkers visit the last strongholds of many rare and sometimes endangered species of primates. Justine heads to Thailand in search of the White-Handed Gibbon. Holly, Ian and Megan get up close and personal with the orangutan in Borneo and Sumatra, the chimpanzee in Tanzania and Zambia and the Mountain Gorilla in the remote mountains of Uganda. Ian glimpses the elusive Golden Bamboo Lemur on Madagascar, Eils Nevitt discovers the Black-Crowned Dwarf Marmoset - at six inches high, the world's second-smallest monkey - in the Amazon jungle, and Zay encounters two enormous and extremely rare apes in Africa: the Drill in Cameroon and the Mandrill, known as the world's largest monkey, in Gabon. duration 56:24   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    My Wild Affair [#104] The Seal Who Came Home Andre, "the seal who came home," is the true story of a two-day old wild harbor seal who, in 1961, was rescued from certain death by Harry Goodridge, an arborist from Rockport, Maine. Over the next 25 years, Andre and Harry established a friendship that brought Andre into the world of humans without Andre ever having to give up his wildness. The human world gave Andre shelter during the harsh New England winter. But staying wild at heart meant Andre had the know-how to be able to make the 200 mile swim home to Rockport. This interspecies friendship weathered every kind of challenge including at the end, Andre's blindness. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4012H] Australia's First 4 Billion Years: Strange Creatures Of all the continents on Earth, none preserves a more spectacular story of its origins than Australia. Nova's mini-series takes viewers on a rollicking adventure from the birth of the Earth to the emergence of the world we know today. With help from high-energy host and scientist Richard Smith, we meet titanic dinosaurs and giant kangaroos, sea monsters and prehistoric crustaceans, disappearing mountains and deadly asteroids. This is the untold story of the Land Down Under, the one island continent that has got it all. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Sex in the Wild [#104] Dolphins In this episode, Reidenberg travels to New Zealand to uncover the mating strategies and anatomies of dusky dolphins, who form mating groups that leap from the water in perfect unison. In a high-speed chase, males pursue females and rapidly mate with them - in just two seconds. Viewers can witness a dolphin birth and learn the difficulties of breastfeeding underwater. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#210] Downeast Set during an era of US post-industrialization in which numerous factories have been exported, this program focuses on Antonio Bussone's efforts to open a processing factory in rural Maine. duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, August 9, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too