Donate

TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, August 2, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, August 2, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11024] ISRAEL - HAMAS - Another cease fire attempt has failed as fighting between Israel and Hamas continues to escalate. Israeli forces have moved deeper into Gaza in search of one of their soldiers who was apparently captured by Hamas. Chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner has an update on the latest developments.
    EBOLA - The Ebola outbreak that has killed more than 700 people in West Africa is moving faster than health workers' efforts to contain it. Two Americans infected with the virus are being transported to Atlanta where they will be treated in a specially equipped isolation unit at Emory University Hospital. Hari Sreenivasan debriefs with the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr. Tom Frieden.
    JOBS NUMBERS - July has been the sixth straight month of steady job gains, a fact economists are largely interpreting as a sign of steady recovery. However, the limits of the labor market are still very apparent. NewsHour economics correspondent Paul Solman has the story as part of his ongoing reporting "Making Sen$e" of financial news.
    CALIFORNIA DROUGHT - As California continues to grapple with severe drought, the debate about conservation has moved from surface water to underground sources. NewsHour special correspondent Spencer Michels reports on the situation.
    SHIELDS AND BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and the New York Times' David Brooks analyze this week's top stories.
    NFL - DOMESTIC VIOLENCE - As the National Football League prepares to kick off its preseason, Baltimore Ravens running back Ray Rice has publicly apologized for a domestic abuse incident that led to a two game suspension and fine by the league. Jeffrey Brown sits down with sports columnist Christine Brennan to discuss the incident and its aftermath.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33153] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3259] Tavis talks with comedic genius Carl Reiner and his equally talented son, Rob Reiner. In a first-ever joint interview, the talented Reiners - the elder a 12-time Emmy-winning TV pioneer; the younger an Emmy-winning actor and director - reflect on their father-son relationship. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1101] Lost Ships of Rome In 2009 a team of marine archeologists, carrying out a sonar survey of the seabed around the remote Italian island of Ventotene, made an astonishing discovery. The wrecks of five ancient Roman ships were found in pristine condition, each one fully laden with exotic goods. Remarkably, much of the cargo remained exactly as the ancient Roman crews had loaded it, suggesting that these ships had not capsized but had gone to the bottom of the sea intact and upright. What happened to these ancient ships? What were they carrying and why had they traveled to this remote, rocky island in the first place? "Lost Ships of Rome" follows the team as they explore the sites in detail, salvage artifacts and piece together the history of the ships and why they were lost at Ventotene 2,000 years ago. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1748] DRUGS OF LAST RESORT - Jamie and Jason Fowler are seeking access to experimental drugs that have not yet been approved by the FDA to treat their son Jack's life-threatening disease. The pharmaceutical company can make the treatment available to the family without FDA approval, but that could further delay the clinical trials required for official release. "How do we balance the rapid and accelerated approval of drugs that we can establish, definitively establish, are safe and effective," asks Dr. Russell Medford, who chairs the bioethics committee for the Biotechnology Industry Organization, "versus the immediate needs of individual patients who cannot wait for us to come to those final determinations?"
    THE AMANDA LINDHOUT STORY - In 2008, Canadian journalist Amanda Lindhout was kidnapped by a group of Somali teenagers and held captive for over 460 days. She was tortured, starved, and abused repeatedly before finally being released for a ransom. Lindhout says she did more than just survive the ordeal, she was transformed by it. "Physically I was in chains on the floor, and I had no power, no control over that, but I still had the power to choose my response to what was happening to me, to hold on to my own morals and my own values," Lindhout explains. "I knew somehow at the deepest part of my being that if I chose forgiveness, that experience just would not have the power to crush me." Lindhout is the author of a memoir about her ordeal, A House in the Sky, written with Sara Corbett.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1106] Financial Thought Leader Jason Trennert "Financial Thought Leader" and leading investment strategist Jason Trennert, who explains his "TINA" theme of "there is no alternative" to stocks. Guest: Jason Trennert, Chief Investment Strategist, Strategas Research Partners. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2321H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#309] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Mark Twain [#101] Part One In the first episode, Burns takes viewers on a journey through Sam Clemens' early days along the Mississippi River, to the small river town of Hannibal, Missouri. Clemens grows up, stumbling from adventure to adventure until he begins to evolve into Mark Twain, the humorist and writer who would revolutionize the way Americans viewed themselves and their language. The episode ends with the publication of Adventures ofHuckleberry Finn, a novel that has been banned in hundreds of librari es and schools across the country ever since. duration 1:56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1748] DRUGS OF LAST RESORT - Jamie and Jason Fowler are seeking access to experimental drugs that have not yet been approved by the FDA to treat their son Jack's life-threatening disease. The pharmaceutical company can make the treatment available to the family without FDA approval, but that could further delay the clinical trials required for official release. "How do we balance the rapid and accelerated approval of drugs that we can establish, definitively establish, are safe and effective," asks Dr. Russell Medford, who chairs the bioethics committee for the Biotechnology Industry Organization, "versus the immediate needs of individual patients who cannot wait for us to come to those final determinations?"
    THE AMANDA LINDHOUT STORY - In 2008, Canadian journalist Amanda Lindhout was kidnapped by a group of Somali teenagers and held captive for over 460 days. She was tortured, starved, and abused repeatedly before finally being released for a ransom. Lindhout says she did more than just survive the ordeal, she was transformed by it. "Physically I was in chains on the floor, and I had no power, no control over that, but I still had the power to choose my response to what was happening to me, to hold on to my own morals and my own values," Lindhout explains. "I knew somehow at the deepest part of my being that if I chose forgiveness, that experience just would not have the power to crush me." Lindhout is the author of a memoir about her ordeal, A House in the Sky, written with Sara Corbett.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#330H] John Lithgow on the Role of a Lifetime Back in the 1970s, a time of Vietnam and Watergate, war and corruption, disaffected youth flocked to productions of Shakespeare's "Hamlet," the story of a young prince angered by betrayal and the abuse of power. Today, in an era of aging baby boomers and an unstable world, we're surrounded by productions of Shakespeare's "King Lear," the story of an elderly monarch losing strength and sanity, seeking order in uncertainty.
    Why are we so drawn these days to the tale of Lear and his dysfunctional family? John Lithgow, the award-winning actor and writer is playing him right now in The Public Theater's free Shakespeare in the Park production, and on this week's edition, he tells Bill Moyers what it's like to perform the monumental role, and what he thinks its significance is in a time of so much violence and unrest.
    Lithgow has been blogging about the experience in The New York Times. "'King Lear' is full of high-pitched, raw emotion," he wrote. "From day one, I've been tracking Lear's journey into madness. It's a journey fueled by humiliation, anger, regret and sorrow. His interaction with every character he confronts is scaldingly intense. I've found it impossible to rehearse the role dispassionately. Try as I may to restrain myself, the emotions simply run away with me."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#258] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    This American Land [#401] Forage Fish, Wild Olympics, Biofuel from Cornfield Residue, Fire Ants Researchers on the Oregon coast study the role that forage fish play in the food chain. Sometimes called "bait fish", sardines, anchovies, smelt and other small fish are vitally important in sustaining larger species - including sea birds, salmon, and marine mammals like sea lions. Humans also catch forage fish, mainly for animal feed, and there's growing concern that large-scale commercial harvesting of forage fish comes at the expense of other marine life, potentially with catastrophic results. Spectacular Olympic National Park is the centerpiece of the verdant Olympic Peninsula in northwest Washington State, right up against the Canadian border. There's now a bill in Congress that would add more protection to the forests and watersheds around the park, and we explore why there's wide support for the proposal among the people living there. In another report on emerging second-generation biofuels, we travel to Iowa where farmers are discovering there's growing demand for the residue in their cornfields - stalks, leaves, husks and cobs - left on the ground after the corn is harvested, That residue, called "corn stover", is biomass that can also be converted into ethanol. Everybody wants to eradicate biting, invasive fire ants, but scientists say they can learn a great deal by studying the social structure of these insects. New research shows that the widespread success of fire ants has been assisted when humans disturb natural areas with roads and development. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5404H] * Congress scrambled to try and address a number of critical issues from border security to funding for the Veterans Administration before leaving to start its summer recess, but once again politics stalled any legislative progress. Intra-party politics forced House GOP leaders to cancel a Thursday vote on their own border bill because of strong opposition by members of their own party. House Republicans then moved to delay their August recess. Earlier in the week partisan politics were the backdrop to a vote by House Republicans to sue President Obama over his alleged abuse of executive power in enforcing the Affordable Care Act. Can anything be done to bridge the political divide that has lead to this legislative failure? We'll get answers and analysis from Robert Costa of The Washington Post and Molly Ball of The Atlantic.
    * The crises in the Middle East and Ukraine continue to spark international criticism and outrage. On Thursday the US and UN announced that Israel and Hamas have agreed to a 72-hour cease-fire to begin Friday morning. During this time forces on the ground will remain in place while negotiations for a more durable truce continue.
    * President Obama announced new sanctions against Russia for its continued actions to undermine Ukraine's sovereignty. Meanwhile the investigation into the downing of a Malaysian jetliner is being hampered by violent clashes between Ukraine's government forces and pro-Russian separatists.
    Elise Labott of CNN and Yochi Dreazen of Foreign Policy magazine will examine why the US and European nations are taking a hard line on the deadly conflicts in Gaza and Ukraine.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#137H] Loretta Lynch on the CPUC, Tech's Diversity Deficit and Free Art!
    Former CPUC President Loretta Lynch on the California Public Utilities Commisison
    Emails that reveal an unusually close relationship between PG&E and the California Public Utilities Commission are leading to calls for the removal of Michael Peevey, the head of the regulatory agency. The emails were obtained from a lawsuit settlement related to the 2010 San Bruno pipeline blast that killed eight people, destroyed 38 homes and leveled a neighborhood. The city's mayor says state officials are "subject to undue influence" by PG&E and that state oversight of the utility is corrupted. Loretta Lynch is a former CPUC president and a longtime critic of corporate influence at the state agency. Lynch sits down with Scott Shafer.

    Further Reporting:
    Outrage Over "Cozy" Correspondence Between CPUC, PG&E
    PG&E Charged With Obstructing San Bruno Investigation

    Diversity Deficit in the Tech Industry
    While tech thrives in the Bay Area, not everyone is enjoying the boom equally. The industry is being criticized for lack of diversity when it comes to age, gender and ethnicity. Recently an over 50-year old worker filed a lawsuit against social media giant Twitter for age discrimination. And in the last few weeks, a number of high tech companies including Twitter, Google and Facebook have released their employee demographics. They show Silicon Valley and tech companies are largely filled with young, Caucasian and Asian male employees.

    Guests:
    • Laura Sydell, NPR Digital Culture Correspondent
    • Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News Business Columnist
    • Eric Abrams, Director of Diversity Initiatives, U.C. Berkeley Haas School of Business

    Free Art! Contemporary Artist Ronald Chase
    For the past six decades San Francisco artist Ronald Chase has worked in a variety of mediums - from abstract paintings and drawings to mixed media and photography. Some of his finest work is in the collections of major museums in Paris, Canada, New York and our own SFMOMA. Now, as he approaches 80, Chase has decided to share his legacy in an unusual fashion. On Saturday, August 2, anyone who stops by his Mission District studio will have the opportunity to take home a piece of art -- absolutely free. Thuy Vu sits down with Chase to learn what inspired him to make such a bold move.

    Ronald Chase's Artwork
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17213H] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2321H] duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3232H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#203] * Discussion about the Ebola virus outbreak with Doctor John LaPook, Chief medical correspondent for CBS News * Khaled Meshaal, political leader of Hamas * The crash of Malaysian Air 17 with Sabrina Tavernise of The New York Times * Mike Allen of Politico * Tim Finchem, Commissioner of golf's PGA Tour * a look at the Charles James exhibit at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#330H] John Lithgow on the Role of a Lifetime Back in the 1970s, a time of Vietnam and Watergate, war and corruption, disaffected youth flocked to productions of Shakespeare's "Hamlet," the story of a young prince angered by betrayal and the abuse of power. Today, in an era of aging baby boomers and an unstable world, we're surrounded by productions of Shakespeare's "King Lear," the story of an elderly monarch losing strength and sanity, seeking order in uncertainty.
    Why are we so drawn these days to the tale of Lear and his dysfunctional family? John Lithgow, the award-winning actor and writer is playing him right now in The Public Theater's free Shakespeare in the Park production, and on this week's edition, he tells Bill Moyers what it's like to perform the monumental role, and what he thinks its significance is in a time of so much violence and unrest.
    Lithgow has been blogging about the experience in The New York Times. "'King Lear' is full of high-pitched, raw emotion," he wrote. "From day one, I've been tracking Lear's journey into madness. It's a journey fueled by humiliation, anger, regret and sorrow. His interaction with every character he confronts is scaldingly intense. I've found it impossible to rehearse the role dispassionately. Try as I may to restrain myself, the emotions simply run away with me."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1748] DRUGS OF LAST RESORT - Jamie and Jason Fowler are seeking access to experimental drugs that have not yet been approved by the FDA to treat their son Jack's life-threatening disease. The pharmaceutical company can make the treatment available to the family without FDA approval, but that could further delay the clinical trials required for official release. "How do we balance the rapid and accelerated approval of drugs that we can establish, definitively establish, are safe and effective," asks Dr. Russell Medford, who chairs the bioethics committee for the Biotechnology Industry Organization, "versus the immediate needs of individual patients who cannot wait for us to come to those final determinations?"
    THE AMANDA LINDHOUT STORY - In 2008, Canadian journalist Amanda Lindhout was kidnapped by a group of Somali teenagers and held captive for over 460 days. She was tortured, starved, and abused repeatedly before finally being released for a ransom. Lindhout says she did more than just survive the ordeal, she was transformed by it. "Physically I was in chains on the floor, and I had no power, no control over that, but I still had the power to choose my response to what was happening to me, to hold on to my own morals and my own values," Lindhout explains. "I knew somehow at the deepest part of my being that if I chose forgiveness, that experience just would not have the power to crush me." Lindhout is the author of a memoir about her ordeal, A House in the Sky, written with Sara Corbett.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#311H] Profile: Sylvia Earle/SETI: The New Search for ET QUEST profiles marine scientist and deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle, and find out why SETI scientists now say we might be hearing from ET sooner than you think. duration 25:48   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#331] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Time Scanners [#101H] Egyptian Pyramids The team travels to Egypt to scan the pyramids - the tombs of the mighty pharaohs - to find out how the necropolis evolved from simple mud-brick structures to the most impressive buildings in the ancient world. They use their cutting-edge laser technology to scan Djoser's Step Pyramid at Saqqara, Meidum's collapsed pyramid, the mysterious Bent Pyramid at Dashur and the famous Great Pyramid at Giza. duration 53:31   SRND51 TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Overdraft This documentary presents a broad explanation of America's federal debt and the choices Americans will have to make to fix it. It describes the connections, opportunities, and consequences of debt at the federal, state, and local levels of government. The program includes interviews with prominent leaders in government, economics, and journalism alongside stories of citizens from across the country who must cope with the consequences - and sometimes invisible hand - of America's debt. In the end, viewers are left with choices to change a gloomy forecast. duration 55:46   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    POV [#2706H] Fallen City In today's go-go China, an old city completely destroyed by a devastating earthquake can be rebuilt - boasting new and improved civic amenities - in an astoundingly quick two years. But, as this film reveals, the journey from the ruined old city of Bichuan to the new Bichuan nearby is long and heartbreaking for the survivors. Three families struggle with loss - most strikingly the loss of children and grandchildren - and feelings of loneliness, fear and dislocation that no amount of propaganda can disguise. First-time director Zhao Qi offers an intimate look at a country torn between tradition and modernity. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 5:00 pm
    Richard Bangs' Adventures with Purpose Pearl River Delta: Hong Kong, Macau and Guangdong: Quest for Harmony Renowned adventurer Richard Bangs explores the Pearl River Delta of South China in search of the roots of harmony. He explores Macau and Guangdong Province in China, and revisits Hong Kong. In each location, he witnesses traditional customs and religion meshing with the new and modern, explores the integration of Western sensibility with Eastern aesthetic, and meets people who continue to seek a civilized harmony with the natural world. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#195H] Included: Millions of Americans are now eligible for health insurance under the Affordable Care Act, including 1.2 million people with mental illnesses. But are they actually getting the heath care they need? We examine the difficulties of enrolling in new plans and getting adequate care for people with persistent mental illness. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5404H] * Congress scrambled to try and address a number of critical issues from border security to funding for the Veterans Administration before leaving to start its summer recess, but once again politics stalled any legislative progress. Intra-party politics forced House GOP leaders to cancel a Thursday vote on their own border bill because of strong opposition by members of their own party. House Republicans then moved to delay their August recess. Earlier in the week partisan politics were the backdrop to a vote by House Republicans to sue President Obama over his alleged abuse of executive power in enforcing the Affordable Care Act. Can anything be done to bridge the political divide that has lead to this legislative failure? We'll get answers and analysis from Robert Costa of The Washington Post and Molly Ball of The Atlantic.
    * The crises in the Middle East and Ukraine continue to spark international criticism and outrage. On Thursday the US and UN announced that Israel and Hamas have agreed to a 72-hour cease-fire to begin Friday morning. During this time forces on the ground will remain in place while negotiations for a more durable truce continue.
    * President Obama announced new sanctions against Russia for its continued actions to undermine Ukraine's sovereignty. Meanwhile the investigation into the downing of a Malaysian jetliner is being hampered by violent clashes between Ukraine's government forces and pro-Russian separatists.
    Elise Labott of CNN and Yochi Dreazen of Foreign Policy magazine will examine why the US and European nations are taking a hard line on the deadly conflicts in Gaza and Ukraine.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#137H] Loretta Lynch on the CPUC, Tech's Diversity Deficit and Free Art!
    Former CPUC President Loretta Lynch on the California Public Utilities Commisison
    Emails that reveal an unusually close relationship between PG&E and the California Public Utilities Commission are leading to calls for the removal of Michael Peevey, the head of the regulatory agency. The emails were obtained from a lawsuit settlement related to the 2010 San Bruno pipeline blast that killed eight people, destroyed 38 homes and leveled a neighborhood. The city's mayor says state officials are "subject to undue influence" by PG&E and that state oversight of the utility is corrupted. Loretta Lynch is a former CPUC president and a longtime critic of corporate influence at the state agency. Lynch sits down with Scott Shafer.

    Further Reporting:
    Outrage Over "Cozy" Correspondence Between CPUC, PG&E
    PG&E Charged With Obstructing San Bruno Investigation

    Diversity Deficit in the Tech Industry
    While tech thrives in the Bay Area, not everyone is enjoying the boom equally. The industry is being criticized for lack of diversity when it comes to age, gender and ethnicity. Recently an over 50-year old worker filed a lawsuit against social media giant Twitter for age discrimination. And in the last few weeks, a number of high tech companies including Twitter, Google and Facebook have released their employee demographics. They show Silicon Valley and tech companies are largely filled with young, Caucasian and Asian male employees.

    Guests:
    • Laura Sydell, NPR Digital Culture Correspondent
    • Michelle Quinn, San Jose Mercury News Business Columnist
    • Eric Abrams, Director of Diversity Initiatives, U.C. Berkeley Haas School of Business

    Free Art! Contemporary Artist Ronald Chase
    For the past six decades San Francisco artist Ronald Chase has worked in a variety of mediums - from abstract paintings and drawings to mixed media and photography. Some of his finest work is in the collections of major museums in Paris, Canada, New York and our own SFMOMA. Now, as he approaches 80, Chase has decided to share his legacy in an unusual fashion. On Saturday, August 2, anyone who stops by his Mission District studio will have the opportunity to take home a piece of art -- absolutely free. Thuy Vu sits down with Chase to learn what inspired him to make such a bold move.

    Ronald Chase's Artwork
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#311H] Profile: Sylvia Earle/SETI: The New Search for ET QUEST profiles marine scientist and deep sea explorer Sylvia Earle, and find out why SETI scientists now say we might be hearing from ET sooner than you think. duration 25:48   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1317] Globe Trekker Special: World War II Our Trekkers visit many of the European sites that played a major role in World War II. From the forests of Compiegne in northern France to the island of Crete, where veterans and locals recount the first major airborne invasion by the Germans, this episode takes viewers on a haunting journey of discovery. Other locations include Nuremberg, Vienna, Dunkirk, the Italian town of Anzio, the Normandy beaches, Dresden, Berlin and Auschwitz. duration 57:01   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    My Wild Affair [#103] The Rhino Who Joined The Family Rescued from flooding caused by the damming of the Zambezi River, Rupert, an orphaned black rhinoceros, was brought up in the suburban family home of wildlife vet Dr. John Condy. Rupert captured the hearts of the vet's four young children before his eventual release into the wild. Fifty years later, the children are searching for clues to their childhood friend's fate. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4011H] Australia's First 4 Billion Years: Monsters Of all the continents on Earth, none preserves a more spectacular story of its origins than Australia. Nova's mini-series takes viewers on a rollicking adventure from the birth of the Earth to the emergence of the world we know today. With help from high-energy host and scientist Richard Smith, we meet titanic dinosaurs and giant kangaroos, sea monsters and prehistoric crustaceans, disappearing mountains and deadly asteroids. This is the untold story of the Land Down Under, the one island continent that has got it all. duration 55:01   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Sex in the Wild [#103] Kangaroos In Australia, Joy and Mark uncover the reproductive secrets of some of the strangest mammals on Earth - the pouch-wearing marsupials. Thanks to their bizarre way of reproducing, kangaroos thrive in one of the most unpredictable, drought-prone environments on Earth - the Australian Outback. In Queensland's eucalyptus forests, he sees how tree-living marsupials - koalas - have mastered gravity-defying sex. At a kangaroo sanctuary, Joy witnesses a tiny newborn's first steps as it crawls to the pouch, and in Adelaide, she learns how endangered rock wallabies are being saved using foster mothers. During a kangaroo dissection, she learns what makes marsupial reproductive anatomy unique. duration 56:46   STEREO TV14 (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#209] The Pruitt-Igoe Myth This program tells the story of the transformation of the American city in the decades after World War II, through the lens of the infamous Pruitt-Igoe housing development and the St. Louis residents who called it home. At the film's historical center is an analysis of the massive impact of the national urban renewal program of the 1950s and 1960s, which prompted the process of mass suburbanization and emptied American cities of their residents, businesses, and industries. Those left behind in the city faced a destitute, rapidly de-industrializing St. Louis, parceled out to downtown interests and increasingly segregated by class and race. The residents of Pruitt-Igoe were among the hardest hit. Their gripping stories of survival, adaptation, and success are at the emotional heart of the film. duration 1:29:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, August 2, 2014

Navigate By Date

Calendar is loading...
Become a KQED sponsor

TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too