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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11020] MIDEAST VIOLENCE - Efforts to broker a cease fire between Israel and Hamas continue to fail as the violence rages on in Gaza. Gwen Ifill is joined by Robert Satloff, the executive director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy, and Mark Perry, a writer and foreign policy analyst, to explore the difficulties of reaching a diplomatic solution.
    FIXING THE VA - The leaders of the Senate and House Committees on Veterans' Affairs held a joint press conference today to announce a bipartisan deal aimed at improving patient care. Judy Woodruff debriefs with the chairmen of both committees, Senator Bernie Sanders, an Independent from Vermont, and Representative Jeff Miller, a Republican from Florida.
    LIBYA - The US embassy in Libya has been evacuated in response to the escalating violence in recent weeks. Jeffrey Brown sits down with Frederic Wehrey a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace to analyze the situation.
    TRICKLE DOWN OR MIDDLE OUT - As part of his ongoing reporting on "Making Sen$e" of financial news, economic correspondent Paul Solman examines both sides of the debate over how to fix the country'seconomic problems.
    EBOLA UPDATE - The worst Ebola outbreak on record has now spread to four countries in West Africa. The lead Ebola doctor in Sierra Leone and two American aid workers are among those currently infected. Gwen Ifill discusses the outbreak and its impact with Estrella Lasry, the tropical medical advisor for Doctors Without Borders.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33149] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3255] Tavis talks with Nobel Prize-winning neurologist Dr. Stanley B. Prusiner. The award-winning physician explains his journey from pariah to prophet and discusses a possible breakthrough for understanding Alzheimer's. Tavis also chats with athlete-turned-actor and new "Millionaire" host Terry Crews. The co-star of the Golden Globe-winning sitcom, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, talks about his turn as game show host and his memoir, Manhood. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    The Kennedy Half-Century Based on Larry Sabato's book, this program chronicles the impact and influence of John F. Kennedy's life, administration and tragic death on the general public, the media and every subsequent US president. John F. Kennedy's legacy endured due to the early efforts of family and friends, Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society" programs, Ronald Reagan's tax cuts and Cold War strategies, Bill Clinton's infatuation with the 35th president, and the "twinning" of JFK and Barrack Obama in the 2008 presidential campaign.
    The compelling documentary features interviews with major political and media figures, including Bob Schieffer, Ron Reagan Jr., Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Ari Fleischer, James Carville, Julian Bond,Andrew Bell and Larry Sabato, among others.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Newsline [#5087] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 3:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3256] Tavis talks with military vet and founder of the Veterans Writing Project Ron Capps. The former professional military officer and diplomat offers a sobering reminder of the cost of war with his memoir, Seriously Not All Right. Tavis also chats with Earth, Wind & Fire's Philip Bailey. The multiple Grammy winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer recounts inspirational stories from his memoir, Shining Star. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 am
    Asia This Week [#415] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3230] Prudery In Putinland: Latest In Russian Censorship Laws Italy: Europe's Mightiest Volcano - Mount Etna is both fascinating and feared, and it attracts thousands of tourists every year. But for two weeks there have been new eruptive fissures. The summit has been closed off since they appeared. Three volcanoes constantly keep Italy on tenterhooks: Stromboli, the most active; the unpredictable Vesuvius; and the tallest, Mount Etna. At a height of 3352 meters, it visibly dominates much of the eastern coast of Sicily. Time and again, earthquakes shake the region, clouds of ash darken the skies and lava flows destroy houses high up on the mountain. A team of volcanologists and rangers on site monitor every movement Etna makes. Theoretically, an eruption could happen at any time. Russia Censorship: Prudery in Putinland - Russia is being flooded by a wave of morality legislation. Scantily-clad statues, swear words and lace undergarments are coming into the sights of Duma representatives. What at first sight looks like a piece of bungling could be the latest in a raft of regressive laws designed to enforce moral standards. On July 1st this year, laws came into effect aimed at protecting citizens from low-quality lingerie and swear words. De facto, just under 90% of the underclothing available in Russia was banned. As far as vulgarity and profanity are concerned, the bans mean that in the media and the arts many songs with "indecorous" language can no longer be played on the radio without being censored with bleep sounds. Not even the statue of Apollo in front of the Bolshoi has escaped the wrath of the Moscow moralists: since the theater was renovated, its loins have been covered with a fig leaf. Spain: Deadly Danger for Europe's Vultures - Spain is home to the largest population of vultures in Europe, but their numbers are steadily declining. A new drug for cattle now threatens to wipe out the vultures altogether. Vultures have long had a bad reputation in Spain. Time and time again, the birds are illegally poisoned, because they are said to prey on living cattle. Now the EU has authorized the administration of veterinary diclofenac to livestock in Spain and Italy - a deadly threat to the four species of vultures that live in Spain. The anti-inflammatory drug has already led to the near-extinction of the vulture population in India, Pakistan and Nepal. The birds ingest the substance when eating the carcasses of cattle treated with the drug, and die of kidney failure. Czech Republic: Hosting the Five Thousand - When refugees from the former East Germany camping in the West German embassy in Prague were finally given official permission to leave for West Germany, it was a milestone that presaged the fall of the Berlin Wall. 25 years ago, many helpers behind the scenes helped make it possible. When Hans-Dietrich Genscher, West German Foreign Minister at the time, announced to the refugees in the embassy in Prague that they would be allowed to emigrate to West Germany, it was an iconic moment in post-war German history. What is less well known is the story of Hermann Huber, the West German ambassador in the Prague embassy. Reporter Tilmann Bunz met him and tells how the ambassador and his wife faced the task of sheltering 5000 refugees in summer 1989. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 am
    Frontline [#3201] Egypt In Crisis It took 80 years to rise to power, but now, after only 12 months, the Muslim Brotherhood has been ousted by its longtime foe - the Egyptian military. In this report, veteran Middle East Correspondents Martin Smith and Charles Sennott of GlobalPost examine the rise and rapid fall of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood. How did the Brotherhood lose control? Could the US have done anything to alter the course of events in Egypt? With unique access to the Brotherhood's leadership, Frontline follows the Islamist movement as it plots its next move. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Frontline [#3208] Syria's Second Front Frontline makes a dangerous trip to the battlefields of Syria, gaining exclusive access to rebel forces as they try to unify against extremist Islamic factions that have thwarted the fight against the regime of Bashar al-Assad. With international peace efforts foundering and Western news organizations unable to safely report inside the country, journalist Muhammad Ali crosses into Syria to travel with moderate rebel commanders and fighters as they launch what they are calling "The Second Revolution," this time against jihadis from the Al Qaeda-linked group known as ISIS. From inside the war zone, Frontline gives the most timely view yet of this newest front in the Syrian revolution.

    Also in this hour, a report from the besieged city of Aleppo, where more than 2000 children have been killed in the fighting. This intimate portrait exposes what life is like for children who stay behind and are forced to adapt, as the world around them slips further into chaos.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Local USA [#101] Through The Past Wherever we go, the past is never far behind. We explore four stories that connect us to times gone by. A family business that started a major fast food innovation, a man trying to keep a legacy alive, a muralist who keeps the iconic images of yesteryear around for generations to come and the fragility of life is examined through the memories we keep, and the ones we forget. duration 24:11   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Local USA [#120] Ptsd: Bringing The War Home An examination of the terrifying syndrome that's all too common among U.S. veterans returning from combat zones: a devastating injury pushes one former soldier into the dark; the family of a Navy Seal tells his tragic story; a woman rebuilds her post-war life; and a program at the City College of San Francisco committed to rehabbing veterans. duration 27:42   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 8:00 am
    The Kennedy Half-Century Based on Larry Sabato's book, this program chronicles the impact and influence of John F. Kennedy's life, administration and tragic death on the general public, the media and every subsequent US president. John F. Kennedy's legacy endured due to the early efforts of family and friends, Lyndon Johnson's "Great Society" programs, Ronald Reagan's tax cuts and Cold War strategies, Bill Clinton's infatuation with the 35th president, and the "twinning" of JFK and Barrack Obama in the 2008 presidential campaign.
    The compelling documentary features interviews with major political and media figures, including Bob Schieffer, Ron Reagan Jr., Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Ari Fleischer, James Carville, Julian Bond,Andrew Bell and Larry Sabato, among others.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:00 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3256] Tavis talks with military vet and founder of the Veterans Writing Project Ron Capps. The former professional military officer and diplomat offers a sobering reminder of the cost of war with his memoir, Seriously Not All Right. Tavis also chats with Earth, Wind & Fire's Philip Bailey. The multiple Grammy winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer recounts inspirational stories from his memoir, Shining Star. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3255] Tavis talks with Nobel Prize-winning neurologist Dr. Stanley B. Prusiner. The award-winning physician explains his journey from pariah to prophet and discusses a possible breakthrough for understanding Alzheimer's. Tavis also chats with athlete-turned-actor and new "Millionaire" host Terry Crews. The co-star of the Golden Globe-winning sitcom, Brooklyn Nine-Nine, talks about his turn as game show host and his memoir, Manhood. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 am
    Asia This Week [#415] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:30 am
    Focus On Europe [#3230] Prudery In Putinland: Latest In Russian Censorship Laws Italy: Europe's Mightiest Volcano - Mount Etna is both fascinating and feared, and it attracts thousands of tourists every year. But for two weeks there have been new eruptive fissures. The summit has been closed off since they appeared. Three volcanoes constantly keep Italy on tenterhooks: Stromboli, the most active; the unpredictable Vesuvius; and the tallest, Mount Etna. At a height of 3352 meters, it visibly dominates much of the eastern coast of Sicily. Time and again, earthquakes shake the region, clouds of ash darken the skies and lava flows destroy houses high up on the mountain. A team of volcanologists and rangers on site monitor every movement Etna makes. Theoretically, an eruption could happen at any time. Russia Censorship: Prudery in Putinland - Russia is being flooded by a wave of morality legislation. Scantily-clad statues, swear words and lace undergarments are coming into the sights of Duma representatives. What at first sight looks like a piece of bungling could be the latest in a raft of regressive laws designed to enforce moral standards. On July 1st this year, laws came into effect aimed at protecting citizens from low-quality lingerie and swear words. De facto, just under 90% of the underclothing available in Russia was banned. As far as vulgarity and profanity are concerned, the bans mean that in the media and the arts many songs with "indecorous" language can no longer be played on the radio without being censored with bleep sounds. Not even the statue of Apollo in front of the Bolshoi has escaped the wrath of the Moscow moralists: since the theater was renovated, its loins have been covered with a fig leaf. Spain: Deadly Danger for Europe's Vultures - Spain is home to the largest population of vultures in Europe, but their numbers are steadily declining. A new drug for cattle now threatens to wipe out the vultures altogether. Vultures have long had a bad reputation in Spain. Time and time again, the birds are illegally poisoned, because they are said to prey on living cattle. Now the EU has authorized the administration of veterinary diclofenac to livestock in Spain and Italy - a deadly threat to the four species of vultures that live in Spain. The anti-inflammatory drug has already led to the near-extinction of the vulture population in India, Pakistan and Nepal. The birds ingest the substance when eating the carcasses of cattle treated with the drug, and die of kidney failure. Czech Republic: Hosting the Five Thousand - When refugees from the former East Germany camping in the West German embassy in Prague were finally given official permission to leave for West Germany, it was a milestone that presaged the fall of the Berlin Wall. 25 years ago, many helpers behind the scenes helped make it possible. When Hans-Dietrich Genscher, West German Foreign Minister at the time, announced to the refugees in the embassy in Prague that they would be allowed to emigrate to West Germany, it was an iconic moment in post-war German history. What is less well known is the story of Hermann Huber, the West German ambassador in the Prague embassy. Reporter Tilmann Bunz met him and tells how the ambassador and his wife faced the task of sheltering 5000 refugees in summer 1989. duration 26:10   STEREO TVG
  • 11:00 am
    Frontline [#3201] Egypt In Crisis It took 80 years to rise to power, but now, after only 12 months, the Muslim Brotherhood has been ousted by its longtime foe - the Egyptian military. In this report, veteran Middle East Correspondents Martin Smith and Charles Sennott of GlobalPost examine the rise and rapid fall of Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood. How did the Brotherhood lose control? Could the US have done anything to alter the course of events in Egypt? With unique access to the Brotherhood's leadership, Frontline follows the Islamist movement as it plots its next move. duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Frontline [#3208] Syria's Second Front Frontline makes a dangerous trip to the battlefields of Syria, gaining exclusive access to rebel forces as they try to unify against extremist Islamic factions that have thwarted the fight against the regime of Bashar al-Assad. With international peace efforts foundering and Western news organizations unable to safely report inside the country, journalist Muhammad Ali crosses into Syria to travel with moderate rebel commanders and fighters as they launch what they are calling "The Second Revolution," this time against jihadis from the Al Qaeda-linked group known as ISIS. From inside the war zone, Frontline gives the most timely view yet of this newest front in the Syrian revolution.

    Also in this hour, a report from the besieged city of Aleppo, where more than 2000 children have been killed in the fighting. This intimate portrait exposes what life is like for children who stay behind and are forced to adapt, as the world around them slips further into chaos.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    Local USA [#101] Through The Past Wherever we go, the past is never far behind. We explore four stories that connect us to times gone by. A family business that started a major fast food innovation, a man trying to keep a legacy alive, a muralist who keeps the iconic images of yesteryear around for generations to come and the fragility of life is examined through the memories we keep, and the ones we forget. duration 24:11   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 pm
    Local USA [#120] Ptsd: Bringing The War Home An examination of the terrifying syndrome that's all too common among U.S. veterans returning from combat zones: a devastating injury pushes one former soldier into the dark; the family of a Navy Seal tells his tragic story; a woman rebuilds her post-war life; and a program at the City College of San Francisco committed to rehabbing veterans. duration 27:42   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 pm
    Newsline [#5087] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:30 pm
    Journal [#10150] duration 28:10   STEREO TVG
  • 3:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3256] Tavis talks with military vet and founder of the Veterans Writing Project Ron Capps. The former professional military officer and diplomat offers a sobering reminder of the cost of war with his memoir, Seriously Not All Right. Tavis also chats with Earth, Wind & Fire's Philip Bailey. The multiple Grammy winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Famer recounts inspirational stories from his memoir, Shining Star. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33150] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 4:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11021] UKRAINE - RUSSIA - The United States and the European Union have agreed to new sanctions targeting Russia, in an effort to stop the nation from supporting the separatists in Ukraine. Judy Woodruff debriefs with chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner. < br>NCAA CONCUSSIONS - The NCAA agreed today to settle a class action head injury lawsuit. If approved, the settlement will create a fund for concussion testing and diagnosis of current and former collegiate athletes. Gwen Ifill analyzes the settlement with Rachel Axon, an investigative reporter covering the story for USA Today Sports Media Group.
    LONGER SCHOOL DAYS - As academic expectations rise, extending the school day is one proposal for closing the achievement gap between the US and other industrialized countries. John Tulenko of Learning Matters television has the report.
    MEDIA & SURVEILLANCE - A new report from the ACLU and Human Rights Watch states that the US government's large-scale surveillance methods are hindering journalists' ability to cover stories. Jeffrey Brown discusses the report with Dana Priest, an investigative reporter for the Washington Post, and Stewart Baker, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland security and a former general counsel at the NSA.
    PRISON SENTENCES - Democratic Senator Cory Booker and Republican Rand Paul are behind a bipartisan effort to reform the nation's criminal justice system. Judy woodruff sits down with the lawmakers to examine their proposal.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Nightly Business Report [#33150] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:30 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4002] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • EVENING
  • 6:30 pm
    Newsline [#5087] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3652H] duration 1:00  
  • 7:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11021] UKRAINE - RUSSIA - The United States and the European Union have agreed to new sanctions targeting Russia, in an effort to stop the nation from supporting the separatists in Ukraine. Judy Woodruff debriefs with chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner. < br>NCAA CONCUSSIONS - The NCAA agreed today to settle a class action head injury lawsuit. If approved, the settlement will create a fund for concussion testing and diagnosis of current and former collegiate athletes. Gwen Ifill analyzes the settlement with Rachel Axon, an investigative reporter covering the story for USA Today Sports Media Group.
    LONGER SCHOOL DAYS - As academic expectations rise, extending the school day is one proposal for closing the achievement gap between the US and other industrialized countries. John Tulenko of Learning Matters television has the report.
    MEDIA & SURVEILLANCE - A new report from the ACLU and Human Rights Watch states that the US government's large-scale surveillance methods are hindering journalists' ability to cover stories. Jeffrey Brown discusses the report with Dana Priest, an investigative reporter for the Washington Post, and Stewart Baker, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland security and a former general counsel at the NSA.
    PRISON SENTENCES - Democratic Senator Cory Booker and Republican Rand Paul are behind a bipartisan effort to reform the nation's criminal justice system. Judy woodruff sits down with the lawmakers to examine their proposal.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3652H] duration 1:00  
  • 8:00 pm
    Charlie Rose [#20157] (original broadcast date: 7/29/14)
    * Tom Donilon, former National Security Advisor on the crisis in Ukraine
    * a discussion about elephant ivory in Africa with Patrick Bergin, Veronica Varekova and Marcus Asner.
    duration 56:47   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3652H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:00 pm
    Tavis Smiley [#3257] Tavis talks with Bill Medley, one half of a hit-making duo that produced some of the biggest hits of the 20th century. The Rock and Roll Hall of Famer shares stories from his book, The Time of My Life: A Righteous Brother's Memoir, which covers his five decades in the music business. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 9:28 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3652H] duration 1:00  
  • 9:30 pm
    Roadtrip Nation [#902H] Boston - New York City The team lands at the doorstep of the MIT Media Lab, where they speak with a graduate assistant in the robotics department. Next, they talk with two women who created sOccket, a soccer ball that generates electricity, and the co-founder of Bamboo Bike Studio. The Roadtrippers also stop at the USA Shaolin Temple in New York City, where they meet founder Shi Yan Ming who is known for his super-human abilities-such as breaking rocks with his skull. They end the week meeting with Nat Paynter, director of water programs at Charity Water. duration 26:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 9:58 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3652H] duration 1:00  
  • 10:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour [#11021] UKRAINE - RUSSIA - The United States and the European Union have agreed to new sanctions targeting Russia, in an effort to stop the nation from supporting the separatists in Ukraine. Judy Woodruff debriefs with chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner. < br>NCAA CONCUSSIONS - The NCAA agreed today to settle a class action head injury lawsuit. If approved, the settlement will create a fund for concussion testing and diagnosis of current and former collegiate athletes. Gwen Ifill analyzes the settlement with Rachel Axon, an investigative reporter covering the story for USA Today Sports Media Group.
    LONGER SCHOOL DAYS - As academic expectations rise, extending the school day is one proposal for closing the achievement gap between the US and other industrialized countries. John Tulenko of Learning Matters television has the report.
    MEDIA & SURVEILLANCE - A new report from the ACLU and Human Rights Watch states that the US government's large-scale surveillance methods are hindering journalists' ability to cover stories. Jeffrey Brown discusses the report with Dana Priest, an investigative reporter for the Washington Post, and Stewart Baker, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland security and a former general counsel at the NSA.
    PRISON SENTENCES - Democratic Senator Cory Booker and Republican Rand Paul are behind a bipartisan effort to reform the nation's criminal justice system. Judy woodruff sits down with the lawmakers to examine their proposal.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:57 pm
    NBR NewsBrief [#3652H] duration 1:00  
  • 11:00 pm
    Democracy Now! [#4002] duration 59:00   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#11021] UKRAINE - RUSSIA - The United States and the European Union have agreed to new sanctions targeting Russia, in an effort to stop the nation from supporting the separatists in Ukraine. Judy Woodruff debriefs with chief foreign affairs correspondent Margaret Warner. < br>NCAA CONCUSSIONS - The NCAA agreed today to settle a class action head injury lawsuit. If approved, the settlement will create a fund for concussion testing and diagnosis of current and former collegiate athletes. Gwen Ifill analyzes the settlement with Rachel Axon, an investigative reporter covering the story for USA Today Sports Media Group.
    LONGER SCHOOL DAYS - As academic expectations rise, extending the school day is one proposal for closing the achievement gap between the US and other industrialized countries. John Tulenko of Learning Matters television has the report.
    MEDIA & SURVEILLANCE - A new report from the ACLU and Human Rights Watch states that the US government's large-scale surveillance methods are hindering journalists' ability to cover stories. Jeffrey Brown discusses the report with Dana Priest, an investigative reporter for the Washington Post, and Stewart Baker, former assistant secretary at the Department of Homeland security and a former general counsel at the NSA.
    PRISON SENTENCES - Democratic Senator Cory Booker and Republican Rand Paul are behind a bipartisan effort to reform the nation's criminal justice system. Judy woodruff sits down with the lawmakers to examine their proposal.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
Tuesday, July 29, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too