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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, May 17, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 17, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10930] INDIAN ELECTIONS - The Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party, whose leader was once banned from the Unites States, was swept into power in India today as a result of the largest democratic election in human history. Judy Woodruff discusses the election and what it means for relations between India and the United States with Sumit Ganguly, a political science professor at Indiana University, and Tanvi Madan, the director of the India Project at the Brookings Institute.
    UKRAINE - President Obama spoke with French Prime Minister Francois Hollande today and both agreed that Russia will face "significant" additional costs if it continues its "provocative and destabilizing" actions against Ukraine. Judy Woodruff talks with our Chief Foreign Affairs Correspondent, Margaret Warner, about the week's major developments.
    BROWN V. BOARD OF ED - Saturday marks the 60th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision that declared segregated schools for black and white students unconstitutional. Gwen Ifill brings us an in-depth conversation on the ruling, and its historical impact, with Cheryl Brown Henderson, president of the Brown Foundation for Educational Equity, Excellence and Research, Sheryll Cashin, professor of law at Georgetown University and author of the new book "Place, Not Race: A New Vision of Opportunity in America," Catherine Lhamon, assistant secretary for civil rights at the US Department of Education, and Ron Brownstein, editorial director for Atlantic Media and a columnist for National Journal.
    SHIELDS & BROOKS - Syndicated columnist Mark Shields and New York Times columnist David Brooks analyze the week's biggest stories.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33098] duration 26:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3204] Tavis talks with funnyman and veteran director-producer-writer Mel Brooks in the first of a 2-part conversation. Brooks reflects on his career and shares his thoughts on his classic Western spoof, Blazing Saddles, 40 years later. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 2:00 am
    Secrets of the Dead [#1202] Bugging Hitler's Soldiers Spied upon by MI19 in a bugging operation of unprecedented scale and cunning, 4,000 German POW's revealed their inner thoughts about the Third Reich and let slip military secrets that helped the Allies win WWII. Based on groundbreaking research conducted by a team of leading German historians and scientists, the film will tell the story of how those confessions were stolen, how they changed the outcome of the war and how they can now reveal, in more shocking detail than ever before, the hearts and minds of the German fighter. The evidence that supports this extraordinary new chapter in the history of WWII will be told through powerful dramatic reconstructions. Acted by German actors, speaking both German and English, they will quote directly from the highlights of over 100,000 hours of secretly recorded and therefore unguarded conversations between German POWs held in Britain. These long lost voices of the past are being brought back to life, bringing with them unique and exclusive insights into What the Nazis Really Thought. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1737] RWANDA GENOCIDE: 20 YEARS LATER - In 1994, ethnic tensions in Rwanda culminated in one hundred days of killing, in which nearly one million Tutsi people were killed by their Hutu neighbors. Now, two decades later in the largely Christian country, many perpetrators are being released from prison and seeking forgiveness from those they traumatized. The Christian charity World Vision has brought together thousands of pairs of victims and assailants in small groups, encouraging restoration through building houses and planting trees for survivors. "I see real reconciliation is taking place, and it's not fake. It's genuine," says Josephine Munyeli, a peace and reconciliation expert for World Vision. "You cannot fake reconciliation. You can't."
    YOUNG GAY MEN AND HIV IN CHICAGO - The rate of HIV infections has stabilized in every demographic in America accept for one. It has increased by twenty-two percent in recent years for young gay men 13 to 25 years old. A Chicago-based organization called The Night Ministry, founded by clergy members, has equipped a van to offer rapid free testing and other resources right on the street. Rabbi Menachem Cohen serves with them. "What it comes down to is we meet people where they are at, and we provide the services they need, and HIV testing is one of the important services people need."
    THE MEANING OF YOGA - Yoga: The Art of Transformation is a visually rich art exhibit presenting the spiritual origins and historical manifestations of yoga. Having debuted at the Smithsonian Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C., the exhibit is now being shown at the San Francisco Asian Art Museum, followed by the Cleveland Museum of Art. "Yoga's techniques and goals move in and through and outside of religion in very interesting and complex ways," says Debra Diamond, an associate curator of south and southeast Asian art for the Smithsonian Institution's Freer and Sackler galleries. "There are also Hindus who live in India who think that every aspect of their life is an act of yoga."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1047] Great Investor Chuck Akre A rare interview with "Great Investor" Chuck Akre(Portfolio Manager, Akre Focus Fund) who specializes in finding "compounding machines," the rare breed of companies delivering above-average returns year after year. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2310H] * What Jill Abramson's Firing Means for Women In the Media * Why More Republican Women Don't Run for Office * Reps. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) and Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) Push for A National Women's History Museum
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); former Pres. Women's Campaign Fund Sam Bennett; Mercedes Vianna Schlap, Republican Strategist; Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#303] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Long Road Home Exploring the impact of wartime Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), LONG ROAD HOME offers compelling stories of Pittsburgh-area military veterans of Vietnam, Korea and World War II still coming to terms with the emotional wounds of war. The film explores successful therapies and documents the promising research underway at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, where doctors study the sleep and brain patterns of PTSD sufferers and examine the reasons why women are twice as likely as men to develop the disorder. The program concludes on a hopeful note, with a visit to a weekend retreat for veterans dealing with PTSD and combat stress. United by their experiences, the former servicemen and women discuss their feelings, their struggles in civilian life, their need for closure and their optimism for the future. duration 58:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 6:00 am
    Coming Back with Wes Moore [#101] Coming Back Host Wes Moore explores the questions surrounding the difficulty with the process of coming back from war. He meets Chris Phelan who was able to successfully translate his experience in the military to a career as a police officer. He is also raising his two-year-old daughter River by himself, while his wife, Star Lopez, serves as a lawyer at the Afghan Embassy preparing to return home herself.
    When Andy Clark returned from war, he and his wife were faced with their son's diagnosis with autism and the costs of his care. Feeling financial pressure, Andy decides to accept a position as a military contractor that requires him to be in Afghanistan for months at a time.
    Letrice Titus works as a counselor in the Canandaigua VA Hospital where all the calls to the VA Veterans Crisis Line are routed. And Brad Farnsley is at a Warrior Transition Unit, a system established by the Army in 2007 to assist with the transitioning of soldiers they deem medically or psychologically unready for either duty or discharge. Anxious to return to his family for good, Brad is stuck by the complicated bureaucracy and his discharge date remains a mystery.
    duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG-V (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1737] RWANDA GENOCIDE: 20 YEARS LATER - In 1994, ethnic tensions in Rwanda culminated in one hundred days of killing, in which nearly one million Tutsi people were killed by their Hutu neighbors. Now, two decades later in the largely Christian country, many perpetrators are being released from prison and seeking forgiveness from those they traumatized. The Christian charity World Vision has brought together thousands of pairs of victims and assailants in small groups, encouraging restoration through building houses and planting trees for survivors. "I see real reconciliation is taking place, and it's not fake. It's genuine," says Josephine Munyeli, a peace and reconciliation expert for World Vision. "You cannot fake reconciliation. You can't."
    YOUNG GAY MEN AND HIV IN CHICAGO - The rate of HIV infections has stabilized in every demographic in America accept for one. It has increased by twenty-two percent in recent years for young gay men 13 to 25 years old. A Chicago-based organization called The Night Ministry, founded by clergy members, has equipped a van to offer rapid free testing and other resources right on the street. Rabbi Menachem Cohen serves with them. "What it comes down to is we meet people where they are at, and we provide the services they need, and HIV testing is one of the important services people need."
    THE MEANING OF YOGA - Yoga: The Art of Transformation is a visually rich art exhibit presenting the spiritual origins and historical manifestations of yoga. Having debuted at the Smithsonian Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C., the exhibit is now being shown at the San Francisco Asian Art Museum, followed by the Cleveland Museum of Art. "Yoga's techniques and goals move in and through and outside of religion in very interesting and complex ways," says Debra Diamond, an associate curator of south and southeast Asian art for the Smithsonian Institution's Freer and Sackler galleries. "There are also Hindus who live in India who think that every aspect of their life is an act of yoga."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#319H] The War On Climate Scientists Global warming may cause humans and other species to change or disappear but Planet Earth will survive, scientist and environmental activist David Suzuki tells Bill Moyers in the second of their two conversations. We live in a time, Suzuki says, "when human beings have become a geological force. We're altering the physical, chemical and biological features of the planet on a geological scale.
    "A lot of my colleagues have now said it's too late, [that] we've passed too many tipping points to go back. My answer is thank you for the message of urgency. We don't know enough to say it's too late. I believe that nature has many more surprises if we can pull back and give her room. And that's the basis of my hope - I see where all the curves are going, but I still cling to hope as the thing we've got to grab onto if we give nature a chance."
    Continuing attempts on the part of politicians and big business to censor and attack those who speak the truth about climate change are pervasive, Suzuki notes: "This is a very effective thing that we know has been done by the tobacco industry [and] it's being done by the fossil fuel industry. You attack a person on the basis of their trustworthiness, their ulterior motives, anything to get away from dealing with the issues. That really sends a chill through the scientific community," he continues. "That really scares me because if you can't have scientists telling you what the information is on various issues, who then do we go to for the authority? Do we go to the Bible? Do we go to the Koran? Do we go to these rightwing think tanks? That's why it's really important to me that scientists not only be freed but be recognized as the most authoritative source of information on these various issues."
    David Suzuki is a geneticist, author and broadcaster known to many as "the godfather of the environmental movement." Since 1979, he has hosted the Canadian TV series "The Nature of Things." In a recent poll of his fellow Canadians he was named that country's most admired figure, yet his outspoken views on climate change and government collusion with the petrochemical industry have made him the target of relentless attacks from his nation's prime minister, corporations, and right-wing ideologues.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#247] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    This American Land [#306] Precious Sierra Water, Nevada Wilderness, Rallying to Save a Watershed Climate change portends less snowfall in the Sierras, and that means less water in California's Sacramento and San Joaquin watersheds, two of the nation's most important and sensitive estuary systems. Snow melt from the Sierras feeds $400 billion in economic activities, supports four million acres of farmland, and supplies drinking water for more than 23 million people. In another look at how the Natural Resources Conservation Service works with communities, farmers and agencies, we follow the Cosumnes River and see how NRCS advisors assist in improving water quality and quantity along the downstream flow from the mountains to the coast. In the dry, harsh landscape between Las Vegas and Reno, most people see only a wasteland without much value except as a site for gold and silver mines. The mining boom days are long past, yet they still affect the way many people think about public lands like Emigrant Peak, Volcanic Hills, and Silver Peak. But now a growing number of Nevadans are beginning to appreciate the sustainable value of these lands as destinations for outdoor recreation. Visitors see a stunning variety of landscapes: the dust-dry Mojave desert, verdant marshes and pools, a maze of steep canyons with near vertical walls - a rugged and serene world that is far away in both distance and time. In Colorado, the Hermosa Creek Watershed north of Durango encompasses one of the state's largest, biologically diverse forests, including some of the biggest stands of old-growth ponderosa pine remaining in the San Juan Mountains. Most of the watershed is roadless and generally unblemished by past human activities, so it's an ideal home for native Colorado River cutthroat trout, rare Canada lynx, and vast herds of deer and elk that draw thousands of hunters annually. An expansive trail system attracts countless hikers, mountain bikers, hunters, horseback users, and other recreational enthusiasts. In a landmark collaboration, a working group of diverse local interests has developed a long-term conservation plan to manage 108,000 acres so that much of it would still remain open to historic uses - including mountain biking, motorized recreation, selective timber harvesting and grazing, while also designating some 37,000 acres of wilderness and a 43,000-acre roadless area. Ice cores may be the closest things scientists have to a time machine. They provide remarkably accurate details about the environment from tens of thousands of years ago. They can also help researchers look into the future of the changing climate on our planet. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5346H] * Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki said he is "mad as hell" over allegations that veterans did not receive timely medical care at Veterans Administration hospitals around the country. The retired 4-star general testified on Capitol Hill on Thursday about alleged 'secret' wait-lists, cover-ups and possible deaths linked to lengthy wait times for treatment. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the investigation into the VA as well as whether Secretary Shinseki's job might be in jeopardy.
    * President Obama renewed his push for immigration reform this week and added that he thought most Republicans were coming around on the issue, but not all. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will explain the risks and benefits House Speaker John Boehner is facing in trying to get House Republicans to pass a compromise immigration bill ahead of the fall midterm elections.
    * John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News will look at the latest controversy surrounding Hillary Clinton and her health - a topic floated by GOP strategist Karl Rove. In addition, the parlor game of who'll run for president in 2016 and who won't continues to play out. The names, Bush, Christie, Rubio, O'Malley, Walker and Warren seem to be among the latest names added to the list.
    * Plus, Molly Ball of The Atlantic will explain how the winner of this week's GOP Senate primary in Nebraska was able to pull off a rare feat - he gathered support from establishment Republicans as well as tea party conservatives.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#128H] Local Races in the June Primary, 'Coming Back with Wes Moore' and Fire Season Updates
    Local Races In The June Primary
    The June primary is less than three weeks away and it's crunch time for local candidates running for office and for groups pushing ballot measures. In San Jose, residents will vote for a new mayor. San Francisco and the East Bay are battlegrounds for key state and congressional races. Also in San Francisco, a fight over waterfront development regulations is on the ballot.

    Guests:
    • Scott Shafer, KQED
    • C.W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle
    • Terry Christensen, San Jose State University

    Further Reporting:
    Republicans Donnelly, Kashkari Face Off in Talk Show Debate
    Public Safety Top Issue in San Jose Mayoral Campaign
    California Proposition Guide

    'Coming Back with Wes Moore'
    As revelations about delays in medical care for veterans continue to surface, a new three-part documentary series takes a look at the struggles -- and successes -- of combat veterans. "Coming Back with Wes Moore", offers an unflinching yet hopeful journey into the lives of soldiers returning home from war.

    Fire Season
    An early heat wave and the statewide drought are contributing to concerns that a particularly severe fire season faces the state. With several wildfires already burning in southern California, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) is already at its peak staffing level for the south and will ramp up to full staffing levels in the north within two weeks.

    Guests:
    • Paul Rogers, KQED/San Jose Mercury News

    Further Reporting:
    New Evacuations Ordered in San Diego County Wildfires
    Bay Area Wilts Under Record High Temps
    It's Hot, Our Air Is Bad, and Watch Out for Fire
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17136Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2310H] * What Jill Abramson's Firing Means for Women In the Media * Why More Republican Women Don't Run for Office * Reps. Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) and Marsha Blackburn (R-TN) Push for A National Women's History Museum
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC); former Pres. Women's Campaign Fund Sam Bennett; Mercedes Vianna Schlap, Republican Strategist; Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3221H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#144] * Gary Yohe on melting Antarctic ice * Ken Auletta on the replacement of New York Times executive editor Jill Abramson * Mike Allen of Politico on the week in politics * Sister Rosemary Nyirumbe discusses her work helping Ugandan girls forced into slavery * Marion Cotillard on her film "The Immigrant" duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#319H] The War On Climate Scientists Global warming may cause humans and other species to change or disappear but Planet Earth will survive, scientist and environmental activist David Suzuki tells Bill Moyers in the second of their two conversations. We live in a time, Suzuki says, "when human beings have become a geological force. We're altering the physical, chemical and biological features of the planet on a geological scale.
    "A lot of my colleagues have now said it's too late, [that] we've passed too many tipping points to go back. My answer is thank you for the message of urgency. We don't know enough to say it's too late. I believe that nature has many more surprises if we can pull back and give her room. And that's the basis of my hope - I see where all the curves are going, but I still cling to hope as the thing we've got to grab onto if we give nature a chance."
    Continuing attempts on the part of politicians and big business to censor and attack those who speak the truth about climate change are pervasive, Suzuki notes: "This is a very effective thing that we know has been done by the tobacco industry [and] it's being done by the fossil fuel industry. You attack a person on the basis of their trustworthiness, their ulterior motives, anything to get away from dealing with the issues. That really sends a chill through the scientific community," he continues. "That really scares me because if you can't have scientists telling you what the information is on various issues, who then do we go to for the authority? Do we go to the Bible? Do we go to the Koran? Do we go to these rightwing think tanks? That's why it's really important to me that scientists not only be freed but be recognized as the most authoritative source of information on these various issues."
    David Suzuki is a geneticist, author and broadcaster known to many as "the godfather of the environmental movement." Since 1979, he has hosted the Canadian TV series "The Nature of Things." In a recent poll of his fellow Canadians he was named that country's most admired figure, yet his outspoken views on climate change and government collusion with the petrochemical industry have made him the target of relentless attacks from his nation's prime minister, corporations, and right-wing ideologues.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1737] RWANDA GENOCIDE: 20 YEARS LATER - In 1994, ethnic tensions in Rwanda culminated in one hundred days of killing, in which nearly one million Tutsi people were killed by their Hutu neighbors. Now, two decades later in the largely Christian country, many perpetrators are being released from prison and seeking forgiveness from those they traumatized. The Christian charity World Vision has brought together thousands of pairs of victims and assailants in small groups, encouraging restoration through building houses and planting trees for survivors. "I see real reconciliation is taking place, and it's not fake. It's genuine," says Josephine Munyeli, a peace and reconciliation expert for World Vision. "You cannot fake reconciliation. You can't."
    YOUNG GAY MEN AND HIV IN CHICAGO - The rate of HIV infections has stabilized in every demographic in America accept for one. It has increased by twenty-two percent in recent years for young gay men 13 to 25 years old. A Chicago-based organization called The Night Ministry, founded by clergy members, has equipped a van to offer rapid free testing and other resources right on the street. Rabbi Menachem Cohen serves with them. "What it comes down to is we meet people where they are at, and we provide the services they need, and HIV testing is one of the important services people need."
    THE MEANING OF YOGA - Yoga: The Art of Transformation is a visually rich art exhibit presenting the spiritual origins and historical manifestations of yoga. Having debuted at the Smithsonian Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C., the exhibit is now being shown at the San Francisco Asian Art Museum, followed by the Cleveland Museum of Art. "Yoga's techniques and goals move in and through and outside of religion in very interesting and complex ways," says Debra Diamond, an associate curator of south and southeast Asian art for the Smithsonian Institution's Freer and Sackler galleries. "There are also Hindus who live in India who think that every aspect of their life is an act of yoga."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#704H] From Farm to Fork to Fuel Discover innovative approaches for producing and maximizing our food resources. Explore how a Milwaukee farmer feeds a growing urban population, discover strategies for reducing food waste in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond, and go behind the scenes at a North Carolina facility that turns cooking grease into fuel. Plus, check out gardens on wheels in Omaha, Nebraska. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#320] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Civil War: The Untold Story [#103H] River of Death Abraham Lincoln's Emancipation does not only free slaves in the rebelling states. It changes the war from one of reunification, to one of ending slavery. The Emancipation Proclamation also gives African Americans freedom to fight. By war's end, some 200,000 will enlist. In truth, Lincoln's proclamation is an empty promise without the power of the United States Army to enforce it. In 1863, Ulysses S. Grant begins a campaign to take Vicksburg, Mississippi, a Confederate citadel overlooking a strategic section of the lower Mississippi River. In May, Grant begins laying siege to the city of 4500. Mary Loughborough is one of the many terrified civilians who have dug caves into the hillsides for protection. Clutching her 2-year old daughter, Mary "endeavored by constant prayer to prepare myself for the sudden death I was almost certain awaited me." On July 4, 1863 - the day after Pickett's disastrous charge at Gettysburg - the Confederates surrender Vicksburg to Grant. With the Mississippi River now under Union control, the campaign moves eastward to Chattanooga, Tennessee, a rail center that Lincoln considers to be as important as the Confederate capital of Richmond. Eight miles south, along the Chickamauga - a creek the Cherokee call "the river of death" - Union and Confederate forces clash in what will become the biggest battle of the Western Theater. duration 55:30   STEREO TVPG
  • 3:00 pm
    Riding Rails In China [#101] American travelers Chris and Sarah are quick to observe that these northern Chinese cities are not much different than major cities in the U.S. like San Francisco or New York. They visit the magnificent Shenyang Imperial Palace. At Changchun World Sculpture Park, they see 450 different sculptures from artists over 215 different countries. In addition to experiencing urban life and culture through eating the food and engaging in social activities with locals, they visit unique natural sites including the Benxi Water Cave, called "the longest water cave in Asia" near Shenyang. duration 57:48   STEREO TVG
  • 4:00 pm
    Riding Rails In China [#102H] Chris and Sarah walk around a 3,900 pounds meteor for good luck. They pick vegetables on a farm outside of Changchun and have them cooked along with a Manchurian style "hotpot" dish. In Harbin, they discover a wildlife reserve for Siberian tigers on Sun Island along the city's Songhua River. Sarah and Chris also visit the Church of St. Sophia, and see how these regions are influenced by Russian culture. duration 58:40   STEREO TVG
  • 5:00 pm
    Nazi Mega Weapons [#106H] Fortress Berlin April 1945. Hitler is in the center of Berlin, 10 meters underground, surrounded by four-meter thick concrete walls, safe from any air attack the Allies can throw at him. But the Russians are advancing on the ground: the Red Army is lined up along the Oder River and going for the Fuhrer. Blocking the way are rings of ingenious defenses, kill zones and strong-points that have turned Berlin into a fortress. At the heart of this fortress is the Fuhrerbunker. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#173H] There's been an explosion over the past decade in the use of automated cameras to enforce traffic laws. 10 years ago, only a few dozen communities had red-light or speed-enforcement cameras. Today, hundreds do. On Saturday, we take a look at a debate in Ohio. Camera advocates say the technology saves lives. Opponents say the devices are profit-centers for municipalities and camera manufacturers and a violation of due process. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5346H] * Secretary of Veterans Affairs Eric Shinseki said he is "mad as hell" over allegations that veterans did not receive timely medical care at Veterans Administration hospitals around the country. The retired 4-star general testified on Capitol Hill on Thursday about alleged 'secret' wait-lists, cover-ups and possible deaths linked to lengthy wait times for treatment. Martha Raddatz of ABC News will have the latest on the investigation into the VA as well as whether Secretary Shinseki's job might be in jeopardy.
    * President Obama renewed his push for immigration reform this week and added that he thought most Republicans were coming around on the issue, but not all. John Harwood of CNBC and The New York Times will explain the risks and benefits House Speaker John Boehner is facing in trying to get House Republicans to pass a compromise immigration bill ahead of the fall midterm elections.
    * John Dickerson of Slate Magazine and CBS News will look at the latest controversy surrounding Hillary Clinton and her health - a topic floated by GOP strategist Karl Rove. In addition, the parlor game of who'll run for president in 2016 and who won't continues to play out. The names, Bush, Christie, Rubio, O'Malley, Walker and Warren seem to be among the latest names added to the list.
    * Plus, Molly Ball of The Atlantic will explain how the winner of this week's GOP Senate primary in Nebraska was able to pull off a rare feat - he gathered support from establishment Republicans as well as tea party conservatives.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#128H] Local Races in the June Primary, 'Coming Back with Wes Moore' and Fire Season Updates
    Local Races In The June Primary
    The June primary is less than three weeks away and it's crunch time for local candidates running for office and for groups pushing ballot measures. In San Jose, residents will vote for a new mayor. San Francisco and the East Bay are battlegrounds for key state and congressional races. Also in San Francisco, a fight over waterfront development regulations is on the ballot.

    Guests:
    • Scott Shafer, KQED
    • C.W. Nevius, San Francisco Chronicle
    • Terry Christensen, San Jose State University

    Further Reporting:
    Republicans Donnelly, Kashkari Face Off in Talk Show Debate
    Public Safety Top Issue in San Jose Mayoral Campaign
    California Proposition Guide

    'Coming Back with Wes Moore'
    As revelations about delays in medical care for veterans continue to surface, a new three-part documentary series takes a look at the struggles -- and successes -- of combat veterans. "Coming Back with Wes Moore", offers an unflinching yet hopeful journey into the lives of soldiers returning home from war.

    Fire Season
    An early heat wave and the statewide drought are contributing to concerns that a particularly severe fire season faces the state. With several wildfires already burning in southern California, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) is already at its peak staffing level for the south and will ramp up to full staffing levels in the north within two weeks.

    Guests:
    • Paul Rogers, KQED/San Jose Mercury News

    Further Reporting:
    New Evacuations Ordered in San Diego County Wildfires
    Bay Area Wilts Under Record High Temps
    It's Hot, Our Air Is Bad, and Watch Out for Fire
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#704H] From Farm to Fork to Fuel Discover innovative approaches for producing and maximizing our food resources. Explore how a Milwaukee farmer feeds a growing urban population, discover strategies for reducing food waste in the San Francisco Bay Area and beyond, and go behind the scenes at a North Carolina facility that turns cooking grease into fuel. Plus, check out gardens on wheels in Omaha, Nebraska. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1306] Indonesia: Java & Sumatra Megan explores two of the 11,000 islands in the Indonesian archipelago. Starting in Jakarta, she learns about shadow puppets, Java's most famous art form, and visits the old Dutch trading schooners. From there she climbs the famous Krakatoa volcano and goes diving in the waters nearby. After visiting the world-famous Boroubudur Temple, Megan travels to Sumatra, learning the ancient art of batik from the people who invented it. She visits the island of Nias, home to ancient Stone-Age culture and some of the best surfing in the world. She ends her trip in the orangutan preserve of Gunung Lenser Park. duration 57:38   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3111] Leave It to Beavers A growing number of scientists, conservationists and grass-roots environmentalists have come to regard beavers as overlooked tools when it comes to reversing the disastrous effects of global warming and world-wide water shortages. Once valued for their fur or hunted as pests, these industrious rodents are seen in a new light through the eyes of this novel assembly of beaver enthusiasts and "employers" who reveal the ways in which the presence of beavers can transform and revive landscapes. Using their skills as natural builders and brilliant hydro-engineers, beavers are being recruited to accomplish everything from finding water in a bone-dry desert to recharging water tables and coaxing life back into damaged lands. duration 56:46   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4112H] Escape from Nazi Alcatraz Colditz Castle, a notorious prisoner of war camp in Nazi Germany, was supposed to be escape-proof. But in the dark days at the end of World War II, a group of British officers dreamt up the ultimate escape plan: in a secret attic workshop, they constructed a two-man glider out of bed sheets and floorboards. Their plan was to fly to freedom from the roof of the castle, but the war ended before they could put it to the test. Now a crack team of aerospace engineers and carpenters rebuild the glider in the same attic using the same materials, and they'll do something the prisoners never got a chance to try: use a bathtub full of concrete to catapult the glider off the roof of the castle. As the hair-raising launch 90 feet up draws near, the program explores the Colditz legend and exposes the secrets of other ingenious and audacious escapes. Then, after a 70-year wait, the team finally finds out if the legendary glider plan would have succeeded. duration 55:31   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#1202] Bugging Hitler's Soldiers Spied upon by MI19 in a bugging operation of unprecedented scale and cunning, 4,000 German POW's revealed their inner thoughts about the Third Reich and let slip military secrets that helped the Allies win WWII. Based on groundbreaking research conducted by a team of leading German historians and scientists, the film will tell the story of how those confessions were stolen, how they changed the outcome of the war and how they can now reveal, in more shocking detail than ever before, the hearts and minds of the German fighter. The evidence that supports this extraordinary new chapter in the history of WWII will be told through powerful dramatic reconstructions. Acted by German actors, speaking both German and English, they will quote directly from the highlights of over 100,000 hours of secretly recorded and therefore unguarded conversations between German POWs held in Britain. These long lost voices of the past are being brought back to life, bringing with them unique and exclusive insights into What the Nazis Really Thought. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#215] Mothers of Bedford 80% of women in US prisons today are mothers of school-age children. Filmmaker Jenifer McShane spent 4 years visiting Bedford Hills and following the women and their families. A mother herself, Jenifer was drawn to the universal themes of motherhood and the staggering power of the mother-child relationship. In all walks of life, mother and child care for each other. As we watch the mothers inside Bedford trying to become their better selves, we see parts of our own selves - and that gives us all hope. duration 1:59:27   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, May 17, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • KQED all channels, planned overnight maintenance: early Fri 12/19 midnight-6am

      (this includes all DT9, DT54 and DT25 channels, along with all paid services) We will be doing upgrade and maintenance work in our Master Control area during the overnight hours of late Thurs/early Fri 12/19. Work will begin shortly after midnight early Friday, which may last until 6am, though we hope to finish earlier. This […]

    • KQED Plus OTA ? Optimistically planned maintenance: Fri 12/05 mid-morning

      (DT54.1 thru 54.5) Assuming that the weather and road conditions permit, we plan to do a bit of maintenance on our KQEH transmitter the morning of Friday 12/05… hopefully 10am-11am-ish, but could be a bit later. Most of the work should not affect the outgoing signal, but there will need to be a cable swap […]

    • Mon 11/03/14: Work on KQED Plus tower (DT54)

      Another station needs to do maintenance on its equipment on the tower on Monument Peak, requiring that we switch our DT54 Over the Air signal from the main antenna to the auxiliary when the work starts, then back to the main antenna at the conclusion. These switches should cause momentary outages only, and most receivers […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Channels 9.1, 54.2 & 25.1 - Monterey (KQET)
XFINITY 9 and HD 709

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

KQED +
Channels 54, 54.1, 9.2 & 25.2 - Monterey
XFINITY 10 and HD 2710

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Channel 54.3
XFINITY 189

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Channel 9.3
XFINITY 190

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Channel 54.5 & 25.3
XFINITY 191 & 621

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Channel 54.4
XFINITY 192

Quality children's programming parents love too