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TV Daily Schedule: KQED World

Please Note: As of July 1, 2011, KTEH has been renamed KQED Plus.

Another way to search for programs is from the TV Programs A-Z Directory.

KQED World: Saturday, May 3, 2014

Comcast 190  •  Digital 9.3

Schedule is subject to change. Please visit kqed.org/tv/schedules/daily for the most up-to-date info.

Saturday, May 3, 2014
  • 12:00 am
    PBS NewsHour [#10920] * Jobs report * Ukraine * Nigeria * Senegal * South Sudan * Shields & Brooks duration 56:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 am
    Nightly Business Report [#33088H] Tonight on Nightly Business Report, the April jobs report comes in much stronger than expected. So what should investors do if the economy starts to heat up? duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 am
    Tavis Smiley [#3194Z] Tavis talks with Elizabeth Economy and Michael Levi. The CFR senior fellows discuss their text, By All Means Necessary, which tackles China's meteoric rise and the impact it will have on the rest of the world. Tavis also chats with one of the UK's most up-and-coming talents, Hugh Dancy. The British actor previews the second season of his NBC series, Hannibal, and his role as an FBI criminal profiler. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 2:00 am
    Nazi Mega Weapons [#101] Atlantic Wall To protect occupied Europe from an Allied invasion, Hitler demanded the construction of a defensive wall stretching thousands of kilometers from France in the south to Norway in the north. This is the story of how this vast engineering project sucked in huge quantities of raw materials and men from all over the Third Reich ... and faced its ultimate test on D-Day. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1735] * Prospects for Pastors; December Project * Diminishing Job Prospects for Protestant Pastors * The December Project duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:30 am
    Consuelo Mack WealthTrack [#1045] Financial Though Leader Andrew Lo This week's WT answers: what can investors do to avoid making bad decisions? "Financial Thought Leader" and MIT Professor Andrew Lo explains his latest research on "artificial stupidity!" Guest: Andrew Lo, Professor of Finance, MIT Sloan School of Management; Head of MIT's Laboratory for Financial Engineering; Chairman and Chief Investment Strategist, Alpha Simplex. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:00 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2308H] * How Boys and Men Can Stop Rape * Why Men Don't Campaign for Women's Rights * Nigerian Schoolgirls Abducted by Terrorists * Former Child Slave Shyima Hall
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (DC); Kellyanne Conway, Republican Pollster; Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy; Journalist Anushay Hossain.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 4:30 am
    Asian Voices [#303] duration 28:12   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 am
    Calling Tokyo This documentary tells the unheralded story about a group of Japanese Americans, who as civilians served America during World War II, even as their families and friends were incarcerated in concentration camps. While the unequaled battle records of Japanese American soldiers are now legendary, little is known about the vital role played by these US citizens who did language translation work and short wave radio broadcasting to Japan, assisting in the war efforts of Britain and the USA. Through actual recordings and first-person interviews with the participants of those broadcasts, CALLING TOKYO is a fascinating story about a unique effort to help hasten the end of the war. duration 25:48   TVG
  • 5:30 am
    the Grace Lee Project When Korean American filmmaker Grace Lee was growing up in Missouri, she was the only Grace Lee she knew. Once she left the Midwest however, everyone she met seemed to know "another Grace Lee." But why did they assume that all Grace Lees were reserved, dutiful, piano-playing overachievers? The filmmaker plunges into a funny, highly unscientific investigation into all those Grace Lees who break the mold -- from a fiery social activist to a rebel who tried to burn down her high school. With wit and charm, THE GRACE LEE PROJECT puts a hilarious spin on the eternal question, "What's in a name?" duration 1:26:46   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
  • MORNING
  • 7:00 am
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1735] * Prospects for Pastors; December Project * Diminishing Job Prospects for Protestant Pastors * The December Project duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 7:30 am
    Moyers & Company [#317H] Stuck in the Internet Slow Lane? For better or worse, the Internet has become democracy's information superhighway, an endless bounty of valuable data and insight or the biggest timewaster of all time. And for years, the government has upheld the principle of "net neutrality," the belief that everyone should have equal access to the web without preferential treatment.
    But now, Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission and a former cable and telecommunications top gun, is circulating potential new rules that reportedly would put a price tag on climbing aboard the Internet. The largest and richest providers, giant corporations such as Verizon and Comcast - in mid-takeover of Time Warner Cable - like the idea. They could afford to buy their way to the front of the line. Everyone else - nonprofit groups, startups, the smaller, independent content creators, and everyday users - would have to move to the rear, and the net would be neutral no more.
    This week, Bill Moyers speaks with two keen observers of media and the world of cyberspace. David Carr covers the busy intersection of media with business, government and culture for The New York Times. He writes a popular weekly column, "Media Equation" and is a former editor of alternative newspapers in Washington, DC, and Minneapolis. "The open consumer Web," Carr has written, "has been a motor of American innovation."
    Susan Crawford is a visiting professor at Harvard Law School, contributor to Bloomberg View and author of, Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age. The net neutrality uproar, she wrote recently, "is appropriate: In bowing before an onslaught of corporate lobbying the commission has chosen short-term political expediency over the long-term interest of the country."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 8:00 am
    LinkAsia [#245] duration 26:46   STEREO
  • 8:30 am
    This American Land [#304] Navajo Conservation, Brokeoff Mountains, Bycatch Survival After decades of yearning for lost ancestral lands, the Navajo Nation in Utah is sponsoring a proposal for a national conservation area that would preserve Cedar Mesa and adjacent areas. Just outside the Navajo Reservation, Cedar Mesa has a rich history - occupied by ancestral Anasazi for thousands of years and now filled with some of America's oldest archaeological treasures that need urgent protection. Facing the formidable challenge of winning support from a wide range of local and state interests, the Navajo's mission would benefit all Americans if it succeeds. Off the coast of San Diego, marine biologists test a new device for increasing the survival rate of fish caught as bycatch by sport fishermen. Entered in a competition sponsored by the World Wildlife Fund, the SeaQualizer is proving effective as a solution to the problem of barotrauma with bottom-dwelling fish that are released at the surface as bycatch. The expanded bladder prevents the fish from returning to their original depth when released at the surface as bycatch, and mortality is very high. The device employs a non-invasive method of returning fish to depth and is highly effective at increasing the survival rate. Between Carlsbad Caverns in southeastern New Mexico and Guadalupe National Park in Texas, the Brokeoff Mountains are a little-known stretch of rugged canyons and peaks that are still relatively untouched by development. In a classic Chihuahuan Desert landscape of steep cliffs, caves, shelters and stunning rock formations, limestone canyons cut through the mountains and empty onto plains full of an unexpectedly wide variety of plants and animals. Local advocates want federal authorities to extend wilderness protection to the Brokeoffs while there's still time to avoid intrusion by oil and gas drilling and other invasive threats. The unusual body shape of a snake may seem like quite a disadvantage compared to other creatures. But boas, pythons and pit vipers have a secret weapon when it comes to sensing both predators and prey: they can sense danger - and lunch - even with their eyes closed! duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 9:00 am
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5344H] * President Obama will meet with German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House on Friday to discuss how the US and European allies may be able to exert additional pressure on Russia to de-escalate the crisis in Ukraine. Earlier this week, new sanctions were announced against Russia targeting the country's defense industry and companies controlled by President Vladimir Putin's closest allies. Ukraine's acting president has admitted his government is not equipped to stop a rolling takeover by pro-Russia separatists. Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics will have the latest on the Obama administration's efforts to help Ukraine resolve the crisis peacefully. Meanwhile a new poll finds most Americans are weary of foreign entanglements and want the US to have less engagement in world affairs. Janet Hook of The Wall Street Journal will have analysis of the dilemma the president faces defending his foreign policy agenda while dealing with the backlash of public opinion opposed to US intervention in another country.
    * After a two-week recess, lawmakers returned to Capitol Hill this week. But with six months until the November midterm elections, the goal of Republicans and Democrats seems to be the same: Do no political harm. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will examine the competing legislative agendas for the Democratic-controlled Senate and the Republican-controlled House and the prospects for any progress ahead of the fall midterms.
    * Plus, Charles Babington of AP will preview the high-profile Republican Senate primary in North Carolina where the GOP is hoping to defeat incumbent Democrat Kay Hagan in November with an eye on gaining control of the Senate.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 9:30 am
    KQED NEWSROOM [#126H] Concerns Over Crude by Rail, the Push Back Against Airbnb and an Interview With Gov. Jerry Brown
    Concerns Over Crude by Rail
    Proposals to transport crude oil on railroads throughout Northern California are fueling worries about health and safety. Just this week, a train carrying oil derailed in Virginia, sending a huge fireball into the air and forcing evacuations. Locally, many officials and residents from Davis to Pittsburg are opposed to plans to increase crude oil rail shipments.

    Guests:
    •Molly Samuel, KQED Science
    •Yvonne Addassi, California Office of Spill Prevention and Response
    •Tom Vacar, KTVU News

    Further Reporting:
    Bay Area Cities and Environmentalists Respond to Crude-By-Rail Boom

    An Interview With Gov. Jerry Brown
    Gov. Jerry Brown is weeks away from what is likely the final campaign of a political career that spans nearly half a century. He is seeking an unprecedented fourth term — 40 years after he first won the job. The Democrat is embracing something he famously rejected in the 1970s: tradition and the long view of California. KQED senior political editor John Myers caught up with Brown at the Historic Governor's Mansion in Sacramento.

    Further Reporting:
    Gov. Brown Skeptical of More Affirmative Action, Anti-Corruption Laws
    Interview: Jerry Brown Defends His Record on Income Inequality
    CALIFORNIA STATE OF MIND: The Legacy of Pat Brown

    The Push Back Against Airbnb
    The popularity of Airbnb has exploded in the Bay Area and beyond. The San Francisco-based company facilitates short-term rentals for travelers. But both landlords and housing activists are worried about the impact in the already tight housing market, and many are calling for regulation. KQED's Scott Shafer hears from San Francisco Chronicle real estate reporter Carolyn Said about the issue.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 10:00 am
    BBC Newsnight [#17122Z] duration 28:18   STEREO TVRE
  • 10:30 am
    To The Contrary with Bonnie Erbe [#2308H] * How Boys and Men Can Stop Rape * Why Men Don't Campaign for Women's Rights * Nigerian Schoolgirls Abducted by Terrorists * Former Child Slave Shyima Hall
    Panelists: Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (DC); Kellyanne Conway, Republican Pollster; Conservative Commentator Darlene Kennedy; Journalist Anushay Hossain.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:00 am
    McLaughlin Group [#3219H] duration 27:30   STEREO TVRE
  • 11:30 am
    Charlie Rose - The Week [#142] * David Rennie of The Economist * Jessica Mathews on the crisis in Ukraine * Kim Barker of ProPublica discusses "Dark Money" * Bill de Blasio, Mayor of New York City * Kevin Spacey on NOW: In the Wings on a World Stage * Kiefer Sutherland and the return of his series 24 duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • AFTERNOON
  • 12:00 pm
    Moyers & Company [#317H] Stuck in the Internet Slow Lane? For better or worse, the Internet has become democracy's information superhighway, an endless bounty of valuable data and insight or the biggest timewaster of all time. And for years, the government has upheld the principle of "net neutrality," the belief that everyone should have equal access to the web without preferential treatment.
    But now, Tom Wheeler, chairman of the Federal Communications Commission and a former cable and telecommunications top gun, is circulating potential new rules that reportedly would put a price tag on climbing aboard the Internet. The largest and richest providers, giant corporations such as Verizon and Comcast - in mid-takeover of Time Warner Cable - like the idea. They could afford to buy their way to the front of the line. Everyone else - nonprofit groups, startups, the smaller, independent content creators, and everyday users - would have to move to the rear, and the net would be neutral no more.
    This week, Bill Moyers speaks with two keen observers of media and the world of cyberspace. David Carr covers the busy intersection of media with business, government and culture for The New York Times. He writes a popular weekly column, "Media Equation" and is a former editor of alternative newspapers in Washington, DC, and Minneapolis. "The open consumer Web," Carr has written, "has been a motor of American innovation."
    Susan Crawford is a visiting professor at Harvard Law School, contributor to Bloomberg View and author of, Captive Audience: The Telecom Industry and Monopoly Power in the New Gilded Age. The net neutrality uproar, she wrote recently, "is appropriate: In bowing before an onslaught of corporate lobbying the commission has chosen short-term political expediency over the long-term interest of the country."
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 12:30 pm
    Religion & Ethics NewsWeekly [#1735] * Prospects for Pastors; December Project * Diminishing Job Prospects for Protestant Pastors * The December Project duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE (Secondary audio: none)
  • 1:00 pm
    QUEST [#706H] America's Energy Future From fossil fuels to renewables, the race is on to find better ways to manage and maximize our energy sources. Tour a massive solar farm in California, investigate the impacts of fracking on Ohio's groundwater supplies, and join Missouri University students as they compete to build the most energy-efficient house in America. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 1:30 pm
    BioCentury This Week [#318] duration 25:41   STEREO TVG
  • 2:00 pm
    Civil War: The Untold Story [#101] Bloody Shiloh With the 1860 election of anti-slavery candidate Abraham Lincoln, thirteen states from the South secede and form the Confederate States of America. Union military leaders, along with Lincoln himself, realize that ending the rebellion rests on controlling the Mississippi River. In February 1862, Union forces, led by an obscure general named Ulysses S. Grant, establish a foothold in southern Tennessee near a simple log structure known as "Shiloh Church." On April 6, 1862, a Confederate force of over 40-thousand, led by General Albert Sidney Johnston, launch a surprise attack on Grant. The fighting in the hellish terrain surrounding Shiloh is some of the most brutal of the entire war. By day's end, victory is in sight for the attacking Confederates. But Johnston has been struck in the leg by a bullet, and bleeds to death in 20 minutes. The death of Johnston is a harbinger of a great change that will soon sweep over "Bloody Shiloh." duration 55:30   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 3:00 pm
    Unforgettable: The Korean War A powerful journey with a diverse group of Korean War veterans as they recall their memories and emotions of the war and of America in the late 1940s and early 1950s, when young men from all over the country were being shipped off to defend South Korea against the advancing Red Army. This film brings back memories of the un-won war that never ended - no one even wanted to declare it a war: it was the "Korean conflict," a "police action" and finally, "the forgotten war. " No matter the name, the Korean War was still a very fatal war, killing tens of thousands of US soldiers and affecting many more lives at home. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG
  • 4:00 pm
    Secrets of the Dead [#904] Japanese Supersub Spring, 1946. Ten months after the end of World War II, an explosion rocked the Pacific off the coast of Hawaii. America had just destroyed one of Japan's most advanced weapons systems. But this was no belated attack against the defeated Japanese. Rather, it was an attempt to keep an advanced, top-secret submarine out of the hands of the Russians. What was this sub and where had it come from? Secrets of the Dead: Japanese SuperSub investigates, revealing the startling story of Japan's successful creation of a technological masterpiece-an aircraft carrier submarine that could blow up the Panama Canal, reach the U.S. main land undetected, and unleash panic-inducing air attacks on American civilians. How close did Japan's secret sub come to attacking America? And how did America's own top-secret super-weapon put an end to the Japanese threat? duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 5:00 pm
    Made In India This documentary examines the human experiences behind the phenomena of "outsourcing" surrogate mothers to India. The film shows the journey of an infertile American couple, an Indian surrogate and the reproductive outsourcing business that brings them together. Weaving together these personal stories within the context of a growing international industry, MADE IN INDIA explores a complicated clash of families in crisis, reproductive technology and choice from a global perspective. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • EVENING
  • 6:00 pm
    PBS NewsHour Weekend [#169H] Included: Jeffrey Brown speaks with celebrated actor Bryan Cranston about his Broadway debut in "All the Way," playing President Lyndon B. Johnson in his first year in office. That, and the weekend's news, online and on-air. duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 6:30 pm
    Washington Week with Gwen Ifill [#5344H] * President Obama will meet with German Chancellor Angela Merkel at the White House on Friday to discuss how the US and European allies may be able to exert additional pressure on Russia to de-escalate the crisis in Ukraine. Earlier this week, new sanctions were announced against Russia targeting the country's defense industry and companies controlled by President Vladimir Putin's closest allies. Ukraine's acting president has admitted his government is not equipped to stop a rolling takeover by pro-Russia separatists. Alexis Simendinger of RealClearPolitics will have the latest on the Obama administration's efforts to help Ukraine resolve the crisis peacefully. Meanwhile a new poll finds most Americans are weary of foreign entanglements and want the US to have less engagement in world affairs. Janet Hook of The Wall Street Journal will have analysis of the dilemma the president faces defending his foreign policy agenda while dealing with the backlash of public opinion opposed to US intervention in another country.
    * After a two-week recess, lawmakers returned to Capitol Hill this week. But with six months until the November midterm elections, the goal of Republicans and Democrats seems to be the same: Do no political harm. Ed O'Keefe of The Washington Post will examine the competing legislative agendas for the Democratic-controlled Senate and the Republican-controlled House and the prospects for any progress ahead of the fall midterms.
    * Plus, Charles Babington of AP will preview the high-profile Republican Senate primary in North Carolina where the GOP is hoping to defeat incumbent Democrat Kay Hagan in November with an eye on gaining control of the Senate.
    duration 26:46   STEREO TVRE
  • 7:00 pm
    KQED NEWSROOM [#126H] Concerns Over Crude by Rail, the Push Back Against Airbnb and an Interview With Gov. Jerry Brown
    Concerns Over Crude by Rail
    Proposals to transport crude oil on railroads throughout Northern California are fueling worries about health and safety. Just this week, a train carrying oil derailed in Virginia, sending a huge fireball into the air and forcing evacuations. Locally, many officials and residents from Davis to Pittsburg are opposed to plans to increase crude oil rail shipments.

    Guests:
    •Molly Samuel, KQED Science
    •Yvonne Addassi, California Office of Spill Prevention and Response
    •Tom Vacar, KTVU News

    Further Reporting:
    Bay Area Cities and Environmentalists Respond to Crude-By-Rail Boom

    An Interview With Gov. Jerry Brown
    Gov. Jerry Brown is weeks away from what is likely the final campaign of a political career that spans nearly half a century. He is seeking an unprecedented fourth term — 40 years after he first won the job. The Democrat is embracing something he famously rejected in the 1970s: tradition and the long view of California. KQED senior political editor John Myers caught up with Brown at the Historic Governor's Mansion in Sacramento.

    Further Reporting:
    Gov. Brown Skeptical of More Affirmative Action, Anti-Corruption Laws
    Interview: Jerry Brown Defends His Record on Income Inequality
    CALIFORNIA STATE OF MIND: The Legacy of Pat Brown

    The Push Back Against Airbnb
    The popularity of Airbnb has exploded in the Bay Area and beyond. The San Francisco-based company facilitates short-term rentals for travelers. But both landlords and housing activists are worried about the impact in the already tight housing market, and many are calling for regulation. KQED's Scott Shafer hears from San Francisco Chronicle real estate reporter Carolyn Said about the issue.
    duration 27:46   STEREO
  • 7:30 pm
    QUEST [#706H] America's Energy Future From fossil fuels to renewables, the race is on to find better ways to manage and maximize our energy sources. Tour a massive solar farm in California, investigate the impacts of fracking on Ohio's groundwater supplies, and join Missouri University students as they compete to build the most energy-efficient house in America. duration 26:46   STEREO TVG
  • 8:00 pm
    Globe Trekker [#1304] London City Guide 2 Brianna Barnes embarks on her tour of London at Buckingham Palace, heads over to the National Gallery, check out the fashionable Spitalfields Market, tours the street art scene, visits the finest shops in to Mayfair and bikes from Regent's Park to the Olympic Stadium. She takes a daytrip to Oxford for a tour of Christchurch, the largest of all the Oxford colleges. Back in London, Brianna speeds off along the Thames River to Greenwich for a look at the Royal Naval College and the National Maritime Museum, then pops over to the Tate Modern, visits stately Cliveden House and the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew, home to the biggest botanical collection in the world before exploring the delights of Richmond Park on horseback. She concludes her stay in London by taking part in the annual Thames Festival. duration 56:14   STEREO TVG (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 9:00 pm
    Nature [#3102H] Love in the Animal Kingdom Animals dance, sing, flirt and compete with everything they've got to find and secure a mate. For many, the all-important bonds they share as a couple are what enable the next generation to survive. But can we call these bonds love? In this look at the love life of animals, we see the feminine wiles of a young gorilla, the search for Mr. Right among a thousand flamingos, the open "marriages" of blue-footed boobies, the soap opera arrangements of gibbons, and all the subtle, outrageous, romantic antics that go into finding a partner. These are love stories all right, as various and intriguing as the lovers themselves. duration 56:46   SRND51 TVPG-S (Secondary audio: DVI)
  • 10:00 pm
    Nova [#4014H] Manhunt - Boston Bombers At 2:50pm on April 15, two bomb blasts turned the Boston Marathon finish line from a scene of triumph to tragedy, leaving 3 dead, hundreds injured, and a city gripped by heartbreak and terror. Less than 5 days later, the key suspects were identified and apprehended - with one dead, the other in custody. How did investigators transform the chaos of the bombing into a coherent trail of clues, pointing to the accused killers?
    Nova follows the manhunt step by step, examining the role modern technology - combined with old-fashioned detective work - played in cracking the case. Given hundreds of hours of surveillance and bystander videos, how did agents spot the bad guys in a sea of spectators? Why couldn't facial recognition software I.D. the criminals? How much could bomb chemistry analysis, cell phone GPS, infrared imagery and crowd sourcing reveal about the secrets behind this horrific crime? With the help of top criminal investigators and anti-terrorism experts, Nova explores which technological innovations worked - and which didn't - in the most notorious case of today, and how the world of crime fighting could be transformed tomorrow.
    duration 54:16   STEREO TVPG
  • 11:00 pm
    Nazi Mega Weapons [#102] U-Boat Base To create a haven in port for their lethal U-boat submarines, the Nazis built massive, impenetrable concrete submarine pens. Structures too immense to be hidden, they were constructed to withstand direct hits from even the biggest Allied bombs. Such was their size and strength that these pens survive today, a testament to their engineering. duration 56:46   STEREO TVPG (Secondary audio: none)
  • 12:00 am
    America Reframed [#219] Come Hell or High Water: The Battle for Turkey Creek This program follows the painful but inspiring journey of Derrick Evans, a Boston teacher who moves home to coastal Mississippi when the graves of his ancestors are bulldozed to make way for the sprawling city of Gulfport. Over the course of a decade, Derrick and his neighbors stand up to powerful corporate interests and politicians and face ordeals that include Hurricane Katrina and the BP oil disaster in their struggle for self-determination and environmental justice. duration 1:23:27   STEREO (Secondary audio: none)
Saturday, May 3, 2014

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TV Technical Issues

TV
    TV Technical Issues
    • Wed 10/15 morning: KQED Plus (KQEH) Over the Air signal down

      UPDATE: This problem has been resolved, and the OTA signal for the DT54 channels restored. (DT54.1 through 54.5) KQED Plus’ Over the Air transmission is currently off air via our KQEH transmitter on Monument Peak northeast of San Jose. Technicians are working on the problem. No current estimate regarding how long this will exist. We […]

    • KQET (DT25) Over the Air: Wed 8/27

      We are aware of the break-up issues for our DT25 Over the Air signal in the Monterey/Salinas area. This will also affect viewers of any cable or satellite signal provider using that transmitter as their source. Engineers are working on the problem.

    • Week of 8/25: Sutro Tower work (including KQED 9 Over the Air)

      (Affects several San Francisco TV & Radio stations, including KQED 9.1, 9.2 & 9.3) During the week of August 25, Monday through Friday, between 9am and 4pm, several TV and radio stations will be switching to their Auxiliary antennas. This is being done so that the tower crew can perform routine maintenance on the regular […]

To view previous issues and how they were resolved, go to our TV Technical Issues page.

KQED DTV Channels

KQED 9

KQED 9
Comcast 9 and 709
Digital 9.1, 54.2 or 25.1

All widescreen and HD programs

KQED Plus

Channel 54
Comcast 10 and 710
Digital 9.2, 54.1 or 25.2

KQED Plus, formerly KTEH

KQED Life

KQED Life
Comcast 189
Digital 54.3

Arts, food, how-to, gardening, travel

KQED World

KQED World
Comcast 190
Digital 9.3

History, world events, news, science, nature

v-me

V-Me
Comcast 191 & 621
Digital 54.5 or 25.3

24-hour national Spanish-language network

KQED Kids

KQED Kids
Comcast 192
Digital 54.4

Quality children's programming parents love too